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1

Small broccoli florets are nice as well (blanch them first, cut the stems short). The crowns will hold a lot of the curry in, which is a plus!


1

I find Greek yogurt is just fine. Even low fat yougurt is ok, but only if you don't overheat it. When you add the yogurt, make sure the pan is off the heat and cooled down. Add the yogurt then heat gently and don't let it boil.


0

Put it in near the end, never let it boil and keep the lid off.


0

If you make Thai curry paste in a mortar, try and find asian shallots. Ask an asian grocer if you aren't sure what to look for - they are between the size of a big clove of garlic and a cherry tomato, and more rounded in shape. They are far more concentrated and thus introduce far less water and volume into your mortar (most recipes using these don't add ...


0

From my experience: Know your locally available brands of coconut milk, and stock and use them according to their differing properties. Even those that, according to the label, are additive free (all the examples below are, I refuse to use other brands), differ wildly in how easily and radically they split. For example, in Germany, you can get Alnatura's ...


0

Do not cover the pan after adding the coconut, try to add the coconut at last, This is trikes from our kitchen zanziber island


5

I think the times you did it with no troubles you used smaller portions, right? These big portions simply do not cool down quickly enough, and the temperature stays too long in the danger zone, say between thirty and sixty celsius. Bacteria grow very quickly around these temps, and so they spoiled your curries. Their waste is lactic acid or alcohol and ...



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