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31

Follow these steps and watch very carefully... Set your oven on Broil (high) and put your rack on the top shelf. Let the oven get nice and hot (3-7 minutes). Fill an oven safe dish with crushed ice and water and place your dishes into the ice/water bath. The cold bath should keep the custard from cooking, but the sugar on top will heat till it ...


12

The old fashioned way was with an iron (not like today's steam iron -- a heavy chunk of metal at the end of a handle) you'd heat it up, and press it against the sugar to cook it. Of course this typically means having a chunk of metal that's just slightly smaller than your container. Some of the high-pressure torch style lighters might also work or you can ...


11

Most creme brulees require baking, however after a little research I did find a recipe in "On Cooking" (Sarah Labensky/Michael Hause) that came from Chef Vincent Guerithault of Vincent on Camelback in Phoenix, AZ and his was similar in that it was not baked. First, just making creme anglaise with heavy cream isn't going to do anything to let it set up into ...


7

Anything that doesn't survive the 150° C oven is not going to survive a 1500° C blow torch. Gelatin has a melting point of about 35° C, maximum. It is a thermoreversible reaction, unlike the coagulation of eggs, which is thermoirreversible. Eggs set well in an oven, which is why they are used in so many baking recipes; gelatin does not, which is why it is ...


6

Here's what we did exactly once but it worked for us: Cut a area out of foil the exact size that you want the topping to be Spray one side with non-stick cooking spray Mix some of the sugar topping and put it on the foil Put the foil+topping on a cookie sheet and broil. Watch them closely -- this doesn't take long. Bonus for our situation: this was for ...


6

What you want is cream with 35%-40% milkfat, and no gelatine or other stabilizers for whipping. If you use a lighter cream, then it will not have the rich, creamy texture, and evenly thick consistency you seek. In fact, if you use a light enough cream, it will not thicken properly. Now we enter the murky realm of regional naming differences, trying to ...


6

Lemon curd is not cooked so much for a time—in general times are only guidelines to help cooks not yet familiar with a recipe do planning—as they are to a specific outcome. The traditional test for lemon curd (and all custards, really) is the nappe, or coating the back of a spoon. If you dip a spoon into the curd, and then run your finger ...


5

Short answer: yes. Long answer: The beauty of Mastering the Art of French Cooking is that all the recipes work. They're exhaustively detailed and painstaking, and godawful complicated compared to what modern chefs are used to working with, but they work, if you follow them to the letter. They're not for the faint of heart. That being said, you might want ...


5

Pies originally were specifically to denote enclosed items (the crust sealed the item that was to be eaten). In many cases, the crust wasn't actually eaten -- it was a nasty charred thing that was discarded. In time, pie crusts improved to the point at which you'd eat the whole thing ... but the star was the filling, not the crust. Tarts, on the other ...


4

Frozen yogurt made with full fat yogurt is very creamy and full flavored. You might find that the eggs are unnecessary. If you do do the custard watch you temperature carefully as yogurt curdles easily when it is heated. If you have a lot of fat in the yogurt then it will be resistant to curdling otherwise you can take out some insurance by mixing in a ...


4

There are a variety of frozen desserts which are all related. The main difference between ice cream and frozen custard is the amount of eggs used to thicken the base mix. Philadelphia style ice cream is made from a base mix of milk and/or cream, sugar, and flavorings. French (or simply plain) ice cream is made from a base mix which is essentially a very ...


4

I think it all got too hot, but there might be other problems. Did you mix the cornstarch in completely? Leaving undissolved cornstarch is a sure way to obtain 'blobs'. Did you pour the hot milk onto the egg-mixture? You should do that very slowly and whisk vigorously (while trying to splash everything). If the eggs get too hot, they will coagulate. Did ...


4

It is very difficult to tell what is wrong definitively from your pictures, but the custard appears to be curdled, or have too much air, or both. When you make the lemon or lime curd, you don't want to mix air into it, which will cause it to puff up, then collapse. You also don't want to overcook it, as it will curdle like scrambled eggs. You haven't ...


4

I agree that it is badly curdled. Custard per se is finicky about curdling, it has an about 10 degrees celsius "right" window - if it doesn't reach that temp, it doesn't set, if it overshoots it, it curdles. Lemon custard is much worse, because the acid curdles proteins even without high temp. The tricks you can use: 1) warm everything really slow. It is a ...


4

I think you're on the right track. Curds exist with many fruits, but the most common are all very strongly flavored (citrus, raspberry, cranberry, etc). As long as you use a fruit that will add a lot of flavor before adding too much liquid (or reduce the liquid out), you should be fine.


4

Here's your answer, directly from the creator of the recipe: This dish is terrific if left for an hour or so after cooking as it gives the saucy bit and the cakey bit some time to separate a little. I have devoured leftovers of this 24 hours later, after i left them in the fridge. In all honesty after being left for this time it's very different ...


3

Soft melt increases with fat and emulsifiers. Emulsifiers make the mouth feeling smooth and silky, but not as rich as fat. Firmness increases with proteins. Thickness increases with dry matter (a bit), proteins and additional binding agents. I don't know which feeling you want to achieve, but here is a list of your relevant factors and what they do. The ...


3

The simplest icing is just water and powdered sugar. The sugar and egg white is called 'royal icing'. I'm guessing that the difference between your result and the store bought result is oven drying; Once you apply the icing on the pastry, you put it in a low heat oven for some time until it's dry (50ºC, 10').


3

Why did this happen? One possibility is that the outside of the custard became overcooked while you were waiting for the middle to set. As eggs cook longer they tighten up more and more, squeezing out liquids that were previously captured by the protein matrix. The cooking process continues for a while even after you remove the custard from the oven, so ...


3

When this happens to me, I am distrustful of a simple reheat. It is possible that it was undercooked, but also possible that it was maybe overcooked/understirred and that most of the binding proteins solidified on the bottom and too little of them remained in the milk, or maybe that the ratios were simply wrong. Your specific recipe also contains starch, ...


2

Is the milk / cream too hot (/or cold) when you whisk it with the egg yolks? Do you return the mixture to the pan and cook it for long enough (slowly enough?) Which recipe are you using? EDIT As roux mentioned in the comments to your question, the recipe you're using doesn't sound like it's up to the job. I've used this recipe for Crème Anglaise with ...


2

Easy:- mix the sugar with a bit of Vodka and spread over the brule. Light with a match or lighter and see the sugar caramelize as if by magic.


2

may have already been said but you can use the oven top shelf if it's turned onto the grill. When i worked in a restaurant we used to use the combi oven, which had the pull down grill to heat the top of creme brulee :) Hope you get it done :) xxxxx


2

In theory you could place the Crème brûlée under a very hot grill for a few seconds, but you are in danger of killing the custard too. Personally, if this is something you anticipate doing frequently, buy a torch. You don't need to spend load on a specialised kitchen torch, just go to your local DIY and get a standard propane plumbers torch.


2

Custards can take longer (sometimes much longer) to cook than the recipes calls for. Have patience, because turning up the heat is asking for disaster.


2

This looks similar to recipes that I have used in the past that worked, although I haven't tried this specific one. You can heat it higher, but it becomes dangerous. Also: mix slowly rather than beating it over heat. You need to let the egg set. More or less, the setting happens as the emulsion of cream and yolk cooks, the yolk thickens and sets up. More ...


2

I think a savory cheese spread would be a good complement. Maybe something like Boursin cheese, perhaps blended with sour cream.


2

As a counterpoint to daniel's answer - whom I'm sure, in all sincerity, makes perfect crème brûlées every time and I don't doubt that you can do the same by following his method - I have made a great many (albeit substantially less than five thousand) of them and have never heated anything except the water that goes into the bain-marie. As long as you ...



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