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24

In fact it's the porous nature of wood that makes it ideal for preparing meat. There was a test done a while ago, which showed the bacteria are drawn into the wood and no longer replicate; in fact they die relatively quickly. Personally, I can't stand plastic boards, they're hell on good knives and although they're non-porous, they do stain. It always makes ...


20

"Better" might be a matter of interpretation. The oils will behave a bit differently, however. Mineral Oil is a non-drying oil, which means that it will not polymerize (form a plastic-like substance) over time. This is good for oiling cutting boards because it will stay a bit liquid in the wood and flow into cracks and scratches. It is also food-safe and ...


16

Your primary defenses against cross-contamination include proper planning in the order of what you're cutting and proper cleaning between uses. In the case of your stew, simply cut the vegetables first and then cut your meat. Doing so in this order you won't need to wash the board between the vegetables and meat. If you want to expedite the cooking ...


15

I understand the intent of the advice to always keep meat and vegetable preparation tools and areas separate is to establish a habit, to avoid the possibility of cross contamination in cases where you are not going to be cooking the vegetables as much or at all; and similarly in a catering environment to be able to visibly demonstrate that working practices ...


12

Besides the material itself, there are lots of other factors -- Surface : There are smooth plastic cutting boards, and there are rougher ones. I prefer the rougher ones, as smooth means things are slipping all over the place and its can be dangerous. Plastic will roughen up with use, but cuts and nicks in plastic boards means more places for germs. For ...


11

If you can't get a bigger cutting board, here are a couple pointers to getting the most done CLEANLY in a small space (mostly tricks from my kitchen manager): Use a sharp knife. It's easier to control, and when you chop, pieces don't move as much. Hone it at least daily to keep the edge aligned. Organize your work on the board. If you're right-handed, ...


11

Whilst you'll probably be fine using the same knife and chopping board to prepare everything that's going in an "all in one" meal such as a stew, here's the reasons I have for never doing so: It's a bad habit to get into. It's very easy to slip-up and forget that you're not making an "all in one" meal and thus chop some lettuce on a board you've already ...


10

The black spots can be one of several things, but are likely a variety of mold. Black stains can also be caused by a reaction to the iron in your knives (particularly if you use carbon steel blades instead of stainless steel). If it is mold, it is growing because even though the surface of your cutting board is dry, moisture has soaked in, probably because ...


8

Cut your vegetables first, then your meat. Clean both knife and board with hot, soapy water after you're finished. For a bonus, keep a dedicated poly cutting board for poultry. That way you can be certain that the only danger of salmonella is from poultry to poultry, which you're cooking to high temperatures anyway.


8

I believe that there are two major options: Wood cutting boards Plastic cutting boards Either of these will provide a perfectly appropriate surface for you to use your knives against. From a food safety point of view, both can be excellent, although they have different pros and cons. There is some evidence that wood cutting boards actually inhibit ...


8

You can use the same board (I often do), but you must wash it in hot, soapy water in-between. Usually there is plenty of time to do this while the meat is cooking. Because bacteria grows exponentially, I'd recommend washing the board soon, even if you aren't going to reuse it, to prevent accidental cross-contamination. If you're using one meat board, you ...


7

Don't use a glass board. It dulls the edge of the knife and the food you are trying to cut is more likely to slip than on a wood/plastic board.


7

It sounds like the one you got may not have been of good quality. I don't remember them being terribly expensive ($40?), so I'd take yours back. If you get a good one, it should last you for years and years, so don't be afraid to invest a little. Your new one should NOT be splintering. And don't put your new one in the dishwasher.


7

Impractical? I think the wet grass + sun idea sounds fantastic! I see two options here- Wood is shaped with the application of moisture and heat. Run it through some steam in the dishwasher and while it is still piping hot clamp it tightly between rigid boards to dry. This method works with all kind of wood shaping but you should know that there is always ...


6

The USDA suggests that "all plastic and wooden cutting boards wear out over time. Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, they should be discarded." Other advice they offer for avoiding food contamination from cutting boards: Avoid Cross-Contamination The Meat and Poultry Hotline says that consumers may use wood or ...


6

The exact number of cutting boards isn't critical, the important piece is minimizing cross contamination. You can use one cutting board safely as long as you're using it in a food-safe order (cut vegetables, then proteins), and follow good sanitation practices (wash & sanitize the board between ingredients). A quick scrub with soap and water and a spritz ...


5

Jamie Oliver has previously recommened the use of a simple granite slab as a Pizza stone so provided there are no coatings etc. it is feasible. You will need to be careful to start with though. Granite could shatter under thermal stress or due to trapped water and when it does so, it could do so in an explosive way damaging your cooker. You need to be sure ...


5

After normal use, wash the board with a stiff brush and running water. Then wipe dry and leave the wooden board to fully dry by a window so UV light can get to it Once every few months (depending how often you use it) weight the board down with something heavy (glass container etc.) into a strong brine solution for an overnight soak. Remember to dry and ...


5

The main difference between types of wood is hardness -- a softer board will be more prone to damage and absorb liquids more quickly, while a harder board may require you to hone your knife more often. What's likely going to be more significant is how it's constructed: Is it a solid piece of wood? If so, that's going to warp horribly when it gets wet. ...


4

I disagree that your board is small. My go-to everyday boards are about 4"x8" - smaller than a standard piece of office paper folded in half. I use them to chop onions, carrots, cabbage, potatoes - even watermelon! Sure, they're small. But they fit easily in the dishwasher and the cupboard, and I have four of them so I can always grab a clean one. My tips: ...


4

One thing not mentioned is feet/pads on the bottom of the board. Boards without anything on the bottom except a flat surface can slip. You can resolve this by adding rubber feet or a damp towel but if you are buying a new cutting board it might be something worth looking into. Also, check out the size of the board in terms of your sink. A large board is ...


4

Vinegar and lemon juice will work if you let them sit for a few minutes after cleaning with mild soap and water (to remove hydrophobic fats). They will absorb into the wood a bit and kill whatever is lurking there. This isn't good for the wood. I would recommend one of the cheap plastic flexible ones. You can bend them into a funnel shape to pour into ...


4

I had the same problem with a new board. Once warped, I saturated it on both sides with mineral oil, convex side was facing my counter, placed wax paper over that to give a semi-porous barrier, then plastic wrap on the top, and layered books on it. Then left it on a flat surface and it amazingly flattened out. I now store it completely flat and it has been ...


4

The simple rule is that if a cutting board has obvious damage to the surface, it's probably unsafe to continue using it. The most common such damage is scratches or grooves worn in by your knives, or actual cracks in the material, but any kind of narrow damage is bad; it's hard to effectively clean and can indeed harbor bacteria. The exception is wider ...


4

You do not need separate cutting boards, technically you only need one board After using a board you must mechanically scrub it for hygiene and flavour cross contamination reasons If the board is not properly washed between raw and cooked foods, it does not matter that it is a "separate" board, you will be causing a hygiene situation Wash boards by using ...


4

Technically, TDF is absolutely right, but in household situations, separate boards are a must. We're not always as hygienic as we should be, and separate boards for raw meat and cooked meat are essential. Remembering which is which is important, obviously - I use glass for raw meat and nothing else so I don't get them mixed up. If your roommate thinks about ...


3

Not much you can do about a warped wooden cutting board to be honest apart from either chuck it out or live with its warpedness! I do sympathise, I have a warped one too! In future (I'm going to heed my own advice) use food grade wood oil on the wooden cutting board, this goes a long way to stopping it from warping, protecting the surface and making it easy ...


3

I typically use white nylon cutting boards for all my food prep. They're cheap, you can buy 'em big or small, they won't roll a knife edge, and they work for everything from fruits and vegetables to salad greens to sushi to chicken. When you're done with all that, throw it in the dishwasher with a hot water rinse and it's good to go for the next meal. I ...



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