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15

Try freezing the oreos first and then cut with a sharp knife. Let the oreos warm to room temperature again. They will not lose any texture or crispiness. Update: In the name of science, I froze some oreos and tested the outcome. Freezing the oreos made the cutting much more...achievable. A room temperature oreo just wants to crumble in too many places, ...


15

ok get a very sharp knife (straight blade) put the blade under water tap the blade on the counter to rid of excess water cut roll in half repeat the process on the two portions make sure that you're using a long knife, and when you're cutting, don't seesaw, rather it should be one fluid motion EDIT or do it as the comment below says :P


13

That is actually quite controversial in its own way. If you are going to use a garlic press, you should cut the root end off the clove (you can do that a bulb at a time if desired) and give the individual cloves a bit of a crush with the side of a big knife before you press them. If you do that and you have a good garlic press, you can then just pluck the ...


12

Besides the material itself, there are lots of other factors -- Surface : There are smooth plastic cutting boards, and there are rougher ones. I prefer the rougher ones, as smooth means things are slipping all over the place and its can be dangerous. Plastic will roughen up with use, but cuts and nicks in plastic boards means more places for germs. For ...


12

Butterflying a hot dog (or any similar sausage) has two effects. First, as the moisture inside the hot dog expands during cooking, causing the casings to frequently burst due to the pressure that builds up. When you butterfly a hot dog the this is prevented. Such blistering does not 'harm' the hot dog but are somewhat 'unsightly', so I would call this an ...


10

Well your chef's knife should constitute about 90% of your usage I'd say. It should be used for slicing, dicing just about anything. Your paring knife is actually the 3-4" one you describe. Paring knives are typically used for delicate tasks like, coring apples, peeling, and some people use it for mincing garlic because it's so small. I've never seen a 2" ...


10

To my experience, the cutting "trajectory" (not sure if that's the right vocab) of a dull knife is less consistent and less controllable than a sharpened one, and is more subject to be influenced by the texture of the material being cut, especially cutting something hard, thick and fiber-ish such as carrot or big melon.


9

You can do anything with this knife that you would do with your santoku or Western-style chef's knife. These are real tools, and they are not especially delicate. It is certainly possible to chip the edge or tip (which requires an annoying amount of work to fix), if you drop the knife or, as the manufacturer warns, whack it against bones. This is a ...


8

Mirepoix means 1: diced onions, carrots, celery and leek. 2. the type of cut of the mirepoix (see 1). The dices are roughly cut about 1cm and don't have to be completely regular. When talking about the cut, it should be about 1cm and regular. So you can cut potatoes in mirepoix, meaning 1cm cubes. So, a cook can say, 'cut me a mirepoix' to mean roughly ...


8

You should apply as little knife pressure as possible in order to keep the meat from moving as you slice. I can offer a few suggestions towards that end. First you need to take the translucent white stuff off. That silverskin is much tougher than muscle and is probably making you use too much force as you cut through it. You also don't want it on your ...


7

There are three factors to consider in deciding whether to chop or mince garlic versus using a garlic press: Texture. If you want a sauce or dressing to be completely smooth, the texture of pressed garlic is suitable as it is essentially pureed. Flavor. As a general rule of thumb, within limits, the more finely you chop garlic, the more strongly its ...


6

Mirepoix, in every reference I've seen, refers to the chop of vegetables of onion, carrots, and celery - in the ratio of 2:1:1. You dice up the vegetables - normally small, but there are rarer applications (long stews for example) where a larger dice is acceptable, but certainly not the norm. Mirepoix alone is not intended to be a dish - its a component ...


6

I just ignore slices that stick to the blade. Each typically gets pushed off by the next one, so you only have one or perhaps a couple of slices on the blade at a time. When I've sliced the whole thing, I can wipe them off. This doesn't work when you're rough-chopping, in that delightfully casual way the TV chefs say "just run your knife through it all a few ...


5

I'd personally go with a standard carving set: Very sharp non serrated long carving knife and a carving fork to help hold the meat steady without getting in-there with your hands. Assuming you're right handed I'd start on the right with the with the ribs running up away from you, maybe slightly pointing to the left. Then cut along the bone, close to the ...


5

A quick google revealed that it is neither a type of cut nor a type of cuisine, but rather the combination of onions, carrots, and celery that is used as basic flavoring in stocks and soups. See Wikipedia


5

First, you have to peel the pineapple. Cut off the top and bottom of the pineapple and set it upright on your cutting board Using a sharp knife shave the skin off from top to bottom, following the contour of the fruit You then have two ways to cut it into either rings or chunks: Pineapple Rings Next, you lay it sideways and cut it into slices as thick ...


5

I think what you want to do is this, cribbed from this book, which has an excellent step by step guide with pictures: Remove the wings. Stand the chicken on its neck, legs point to the ceiling and breasts pointing away from you. slide the cleaver between the body and wing, cutting through the joint close to the body. You should slide the knife between the ...


4

Cooks Illustrated has a couple of great videos (subscription, or free trial, required). Basic Knife Skills More Basic Knife Skills


4

One thing not mentioned is feet/pads on the bottom of the board. Boards without anything on the bottom except a flat surface can slip. You can resolve this by adding rubber feet or a damp towel but if you are buying a new cutting board it might be something worth looking into. Also, check out the size of the board in terms of your sink. A large board is ...


4

Take an unpeeled and un-cored apple, and cut in half down the central core line Place cut side down and slice thinly perpendicular to the central core line Any seed parts will fall out if not desired On a good variety apple the the core (the actual fruit) is perfectly edible. Especially when cooked it seems the same as the surrounding flesh (false fruit) ...


4

I've eaten plenty of apple pies with crescent slices. Nothing wrong with it at all. If you don't have any special tools, it's probably the best way to get slices that are the full length of the apple. It's probably what I'd do if I made a pie tonight. A lot of people probably slice differently, though. In particular, if you have a corer (which doesn't also ...


4

Don't cut it up before cooking, do it after cooking. This is a common issue with many Mexican style recipes Coat the fish with your spice mix, and cook as desired. When done, cut into cubes/chunks or flake onto your tortilla Usually thinner fillets work best for this style in regards to surface area exposed to spices etc Do the same for beef tortilla, ...


4

No, there is not a risk to getting the kind of cut you describe, as long as you treat your knife with the respect it deserves. If there's a dull, raised part at the back of the knife, it is called the bolster, otherwise it's the heel of the blade. The raised version is a common trait in forged knifes, and is supposed to add strength to the blade. ...


4

You could look at your knife skills. Professional cooks are either faster than ordinary cooks, so the food doesn't have time to adhere to the blade, or maybe their knives are sharper. Do you hone your knife (correctly) before you start cutting? Another thing is the way professional cooks cut, they use the knife to slice through the food making a slicing ...


4

You need a slicing knife - a very thin, very long, very sharp blade, with kullens. Thin (measured top to bottom), because you don't need the heft or maneuverability of a chef's knife, and the less metal in contact with the meat as you cut it, the better. Long, because you don't want to saw at the meat - the metal that is in contact will pull a small amount ...


4

Assuming you are asking how to debone a raw chicken thigh, the process is not very difficult, and becomes easier with practice. This video from AllRecipes shows it clearly (I watched, but with sound off, so I don't know about the narration). Its much easier to understand by watching than by reading. The best knife to use a thin, slightly flexible knife, ...


4

These are sections of turkey leg (drumstick) cut as to appear like a non-halal/kosher bone-in cut of meat, like a pork chop. The flesh is turkey, and hence not as robust as pork - treat more like a veal or lamb chop in terms of cooking technique, but season like pork or poultry. Here is a thread on Chowhound discussing various ways to prepare and serve.


4

I don't think there's an "official" answer, and using obscure French terms is a good way not to be understood, but for reasonably knowledgeable readers, the most concise terms are definitely slicing latitudinally and longitudinally. ("first, assume a spherical onion...")


3

I think the most important thing is to make sure your knife is sharp. I would also make sure you let the ribs rest for 10 minutes or so. Then, you should be able to stand them on edge, with the tips up in the air and cut down cleanly between the bones. If your ribs are are pulling away from the bone too much for this, then you can lay them flat with the bone ...



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