Hot answers tagged

42

Use a sharp knife, dull knives don't slice, they split the same way an axe splits logs and that will generate that sideways force that throws carrot bits. Also learn to practice your slicing and chopping technique. You shouldn't be dropping the blade straight down like a axe or guillotine. You should be moving the blade in a orbital movement, so that you ...


37

You need a sharper knife. With a dull knife, you'll have trouble getting through the skin, and end up tearing and smashing, releasing a lot of juice. With a sharp knife, you'll get through the skin cleanly and leave the tomatoes much more intact.


28

Why bother paying for instruction or books. The best way to learn is watching a video and practicing. Youtube Youtube has a great wealth of videos on knife skills. I'm more a visual learner. I like to see a video. A book are not going to help me squat. Knife Skills: Julliene with Ann Burrell Knife Skills: Chiffonade with Ann Burrell Knife SKills: ...


16

ok get a very sharp knife (straight blade) put the blade under water tap the blade on the counter to rid of excess water cut roll in half repeat the process on the two portions make sure that you're using a long knife, and when you're cutting, don't seesaw, rather it should be one fluid motion EDIT or do it as the comment below says :P


16

I really like the book "Knife skills Illustrated"; it is a bit annoying that it has left and right handed versions of everything, though.


16

Try freezing the oreos first and then cut with a sharp knife. Let the oreos warm to room temperature again. They will not lose any texture or crispiness. Update: In the name of science, I froze some oreos and tested the outcome. Freezing the oreos made the cutting much more...achievable. A room temperature oreo just wants to crumble in too many places, ...


16

Both Escoce's and Elendil's answers are great: the key is a sharp knife, and the vast majority of people (in my experience) do not have very sharp knives in their kitchens. When people come over to my kitchen and try to cut something they are often shocked at how easy it is. If your knives slide off of food (like onion skins or tomato skins) rather than ...


15

That is actually quite controversial in its own way. If you are going to use a garlic press, you should cut the root end off the clove (you can do that a bulb at a time if desired) and give the individual cloves a bit of a crush with the side of a big knife before you press them. If you do that and you have a good garlic press, you can then just pluck the ...


15

Although a sharp or serrated knife are the best solution, there's also a trick that you can use when you're working with less than ideal knives (ie, in someone else's kitchen). Use the tip of the knife to stab the tomato at the spacing that you'll be cutting it. Slice at each of the stab marks If dicing, place a couple of slices on the board, and then ...


13

Besides the material itself, there are lots of other factors -- Surface : There are smooth plastic cutting boards, and there are rougher ones. I prefer the rougher ones, as smooth means things are slipping all over the place and its can be dangerous. Plastic will roughen up with use, but cuts and nicks in plastic boards means more places for germs. For ...


12

Butterflying a hot dog (or any similar sausage) has two effects. First, as the moisture inside the hot dog expands during cooking, causing the casings to frequently burst due to the pressure that builds up. When you butterfly a hot dog the this is prevented. Such blistering does not 'harm' the hot dog but are somewhat 'unsightly', so I would call this an ...


12

Although this is partially personal preference, in general you should have the uncut ingredients on the side of your non-cutting hand. This will set up a logical flow of material which keeps you from having to reach over your cutting hand. If you chop with your right then you'd have the uncut ingredients on your left, as after knife work your chopped ...


11

Well your chef's knife should constitute about 90% of your usage I'd say. It should be used for slicing, dicing just about anything. Your paring knife is actually the 3-4" one you describe. Paring knives are typically used for delicate tasks like, coring apples, peeling, and some people use it for mincing garlic because it's so small. I've never seen a 2" ...


10

To my experience, the cutting "trajectory" (not sure if that's the right vocab) of a dull knife is less consistent and less controllable than a sharpened one, and is more subject to be influenced by the texture of the material being cut, especially cutting something hard, thick and fiber-ish such as carrot or big melon.


10

You can do anything with this knife that you would do with your santoku or Western-style chef's knife. These are real tools, and they are not especially delicate. It is certainly possible to chip the edge or tip (which requires an annoying amount of work to fix), if you drop the knife or, as the manufacturer warns, whack it against bones. This is a ...


10

There are three factors to consider in deciding whether to chop or mince garlic versus using a garlic press: Texture. If you want a sauce or dressing to be completely smooth, the texture of pressed garlic is suitable as it is essentially pureed. Flavor. As a general rule of thumb, within limits, the more finely you chop garlic, the more strongly its ...


10

Use a bigger, sharper knife. If you're having to apply so much pressure to cut a vegetable that it's flying off into the ether, your knife isn't sharp enough. Furthermore, a blunt knife is a dangerous knife, because it is more likely to slip off the surface of the thing you're cutting and end up in your hand.


9

You should apply as little knife pressure as possible in order to keep the meat from moving as you slice. I can offer a few suggestions towards that end. First you need to take the translucent white stuff off. That silverskin is much tougher than muscle and is probably making you use too much force as you cut through it. You also don't want it on your ...


8

The Good Eats episode American Slicer was devoted entirely to knife usage.


8

Mirepoix means 1: diced onions, carrots, celery and leek. 2. the type of cut of the mirepoix (see 1). The dices are roughly cut about 1cm and don't have to be completely regular. When talking about the cut, it should be about 1cm and regular. So you can cut potatoes in mirepoix, meaning 1cm cubes. So, a cook can say, 'cut me a mirepoix' to mean roughly ...


8

the wire egg slicers seem to be free of this problem. Perhaps you could use a wire, or better yet the wire cutting tool that potters use for clay.


7

Don't use a glass board. It dulls the edge of the knife and the food you are trying to cut is more likely to slip than on a wood/plastic board.


6

First, you have to peel the pineapple. Cut off the top and bottom of the pineapple and set it upright on your cutting board Using a sharp knife shave the skin off from top to bottom, following the contour of the fruit You then have two ways to cut it into either rings or chunks: Pineapple Rings Next, you lay it sideways and cut it into slices as thick ...


6

Mirepoix, in every reference I've seen, refers to the chop of vegetables of onion, carrots, and celery - in the ratio of 2:1:1. You dice up the vegetables - normally small, but there are rarer applications (long stews for example) where a larger dice is acceptable, but certainly not the norm. Mirepoix alone is not intended to be a dish - its a component ...


6

I just ignore slices that stick to the blade. Each typically gets pushed off by the next one, so you only have one or perhaps a couple of slices on the blade at a time. When I've sliced the whole thing, I can wipe them off. This doesn't work when you're rough-chopping, in that delightfully casual way the TV chefs say "just run your knife through it all a few ...


6

You could look at your knife skills. Professional cooks are either faster than ordinary cooks, so the food doesn't have time to adhere to the blade, or maybe their knives are sharper. Do you hone your knife (correctly) before you start cutting? Another thing is the way professional cooks cut, they use the knife to slice through the food making a slicing ...


6

The simplest way to remove kidney cores is to cut the kidneys in half (horizontally) then snip the cores out with a pair of sharp scissors. With practice this can be done in two or three quick cuts.


6

If you are not bothered about the shape of the vegetables, you can cut the (for example) carrot along its length, then place the flat side against the chopping board. You can then slice, dice or whatever with much less effort, and the carrot pieces won't roll off the board.


6

My favored way is a very sharp cooks knife. Others have said serrated knifes. I also do that if my cooks knife needs sharpening (sometimes I neglect it). Note: there are general use serrated knives, often used to slice bread. Also on the market are serrated knives specifically made for tomatoes. I think the serrations purpose-built for tomatoes are ...



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