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20

There are a few possibilities: 1 cup milk plus 1 Tbsp lemon juice or white vinegar, let stand for 10 minutes 1 cup milk plus 2 tsp cream of tartar, let stand for 10 minutes 2 parts plain yogurt to 1 part milk Plain, low-fat yogurt Sour cream Molasses (if batter requires baking soda) I have used the first two with success. Source: Cook's Thesaurus


18

You are correct that in the US buttermilk refers to cultured milk and not the soured leftovers from making butter. Historically buttermilk was the liquid left after making butter that had fermented during the accumulation of the cream. It was described as milky and sour- not creamy like modern buttermilk. Your recipe is certainly referring to the cultured ...


15

Technically, this is not precisely buttermilk, but it's pretty close in both composition and usage. The term "buttermilk" can actually refer to a wide range of fermented milk varieties. Traditionally, buttermilk was produced by allowing natural bacteria present in cream to ferment some of the sugar lactose into lactic acid. This made churning butter from ...


12

You can use the aforementioned substitutions for buttermilk but keep in mind that they will produce a slightly different flavor due to the types of acids and their flavor profiles: -Buttermilk = lactic acid -Lemon juice = citric acid -Vinegar = acetic acid Chemically they will work the same however. Sour cream or yogurt thinned with milk to the ...


10

This is somewhat regionally-dependent. You'll want to take into account where your recipe is from. In the U.S., light cream is 18% fat (although, officially it can be anywhere from 18-30%). It is equivalent to table cream in Canada and single cream or just cream in the UK. I believe it is also sometimes referred to as table cream or coffee cream in the ...


7

You'll want to look for one of two products either lait fermenté or lait ribot. Lait fermenté is a cultured buttermilk. This is homogenized and pasteurized milk which has been cultured with lactic acid bacteria. This is the de facto standard buttermilk in modern times. If you go to an American grocery store and buy buttermilk you are buying cultured ...


6

Soy milk works great in pancakes. My basic recipe for pancakes is about a cup of flour, about a cup of soy milk, a tablespoon or two of sugar and veg oil, and a few teaspoons of baking powder. Works great, makes nice, fluffy pancakes. (I know, not a "recipe" so much as list of ingredients with approximate proportions, but that's how I tend to cook, ...


6

I think that there are a few different concepts being conflated here - let's try to clear those up before getting to the heart of the matter. First of all, acidity causes just about any dairy product to curdle. That is precisely how cheese is made. Acidity, salt, and heat are all catalysts in the curdling process. This does not, however, affect clarified ...


6

The biggest reason to heat milk to almost boiling before fermenting is that it improves the texture of the yogurt. During fermentation the bacteria consume lactose and produce lactic acid which causes the milk proteins to denature and coagulate trapping most of the fat. The proteins involved are primarily the casein proteins. When this happens, there is ...


6

I think that it is doable, if the restriction doesn't require the dessert to be exactly a tiramisu. Many dairy-based cremes are interchangeable, similar in texture, and require no eggs at all. The alcohol in some tiramisu versions can be safely left out. The short time is the worst restriction. Thickeners like agar agar may not set in the short time. You ...


5

It is quite common to make meat loaf with milk-soaked cubes of bread, but I've never heard of tenderising meat with it. Having said that, some kind of fat is common for marinades (yoghurt for example), so it might work. I'd try it with full cream milk, not half-and-half. I think the reason for soaking liver in milk is to make the taste milder, as lamb, pork ...


5

Do you have the ingredients necessary to make more? You could make a second batch, without adding sugar, and combine them.


5

I've seen both milk + white vinegar or milk + lemon juice mentioned as substitutes. I've only tried the former, and that worked great. I've used a ratio of 1 cup milk to 1 tablespoon of vinegar.


5

I often use coconut milk or cream in my pancakes and it's delicious. Sometimes rice milk, but it does have a bit of a tendancy to stick. Ok if you're using teflon I suppose.


5

Hydrocolloids like Guar and Xanthan gum don't prevent the ice cream from melting, rather they change the texture (more like jello). There are other ice cream additives. Instead, I'd recommend optimizing the physics before enlisting chemical help. What happens is that the ice cream batter mixture warms up during the churning process and loses consistency ...


4

Looking for a farmers market is a good way to find fresh possibly additive-free dairy, or to find recommendations on where to get fresh additive-free dairy. Just talk to the vendors. Most know more about the bad side of additives and hormones than us and look very diligently to avoid them.


4

In regard to the issues you've had with the Toffutti Sour Supreme...wait until you take it off the heat and stir it in right before serving. If it still breaks, then try stirring arrowroot powder, tapioca starch (avail. in Asian markets), or potato starch (about a tablespoon per cup of sour supreme) into it before adding to the stroganoff. These ...


4

Let me start by saying that I'm not familiar with the problem taste you're describing in dairy foods. I am, however, quite sensitive to bitter tastes in many other foods, which is linked to a phenomenon often studied in genetics classes: The ability or inability to taste PTC, PROP or thiourea, chemical compounds associated with bitter flavors. The ability ...


4

In the Israeli Army I've had a veal "parmesan" made with a tahini sauce. It's a very different dish, of course. It's also common to get beef/noodle recipes that don't include the dairy component. In general you're often better off substituting the meat (for fish, or a vegetarian patty like seitan) or working off of different recipes. Trying to make kosher ...


4

It appears that the product closest to American cultured buttermilk is Dickmilch. As noted here, This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cow's milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria—either Streptococcus lactis or ...


4

Food in general spoils when bacteria, fungus, and other little bugs eat the food, multiply into more, create waste, and then die. I would imagine that the increased population of "bugs" found on a old, used, not washed spoon would cause the decomposition of new creme fraiche to accelerate, but if you wash the spoon, then no-problem.


4

Casein is the milk protein that gels to form yogurt, encapsulating whey in a "spongy" matrix. Casein floats around in milk in the form of globules, or micelles. In fresh milk, the suspended micelles bump into each other and bounce away, going off in different directions. When an acid is added to the milk, the interactions between the protein micelles are ...


4

Handling raw milk is risky, and please note this information is not professional advice and is not to be taken as an authoritative response. I will, however, attempt to provide some thoughts on handling raw milk below. Selling unpasteurized milk is illegal in some countries, and official sources usually discourage the consumption of raw milk instead of ...


4

As nobody seems to have a good source to official information beyond Mando's FDA link, I will tell you of my experience. In Balkan villages where cows are held in traditional ways and not inspected by veterinarians, the accepted wisdom is that the milk has to be boiled on the day it is bought, and drunk within the next 2 or 3 days. The boiling itself is ...


4

The clock on the danger zone starts when the food temperature drops below 60 celsius. It should be 4 hours for coffee - two hours are for meat, where it is assumed that bacteria in it have had some chance to grow while it was being butchered, transported, and stored in a supermarket. In coffee and creamer, there will be no bacteria growth at all in the ...


3

The answer is that they are not much different. During fermentation, some of the milk's lactose is converted by bacteria into protein and other substances. The amount of conversion is pretty insignificant in terms of calories and grams of macronutrients. The most important effects are the changes in taste and consistency and the presence of live bacteria. ...


3

You might check with localharvest.org and find a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm in your area. That is if you live in the U.S. Not sure if this type of thing is available in other countries, but I wouldn't be surprised if it is in some form. The local harvest website has a search form where you can type in your zip code to look for CSA farms in ...


3

I would put the milk in a glass, and then put that glass in a large pot filled with warm water, this should help get the milk up to temp quickly with out haveing to worry about going over. When ever I use yeast i always shoot for around 100 F. Since body temp is 98.6, just stick your finger (clean finger) in the liquid and if it feels slightly warm you ...


3

I don't think there's any dairy in twinkies or similar packaged items -- it's whipped fat, with sugar and flavorings. But all of the items you mention contain fat, so it's possible that it's a product of rancidity. I don't know if it's related to the supertasters stuff that bikeboy389 mentioned, but some people experience taste differently -- I can't stand ...


3

Ah, I just read the answer to this in The Fat Duck Cookbook. Foams collapse when the water drains out of the bubbles. Ingredients like gums that thicken water slow this, and those that thin water, like alcohol speed it up. Adding the alcohol just before serving (with just a bit more whipping) can help. You could also try adding say 1/8 teaspoon of xanthan ...



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