New answers tagged

4

Right so a couple things here. That hood doesn't vent outside. It filters the air and blows it back into the kitchen. Ok, not ideal but get some charcoal, and keep the intake clean. Cooking with peppers, including black pepper can gas a room. When my girl friend cooks with Montreal steak seasoning I have to vacate. I can't breathe while its cooking. ...


-1

Yes, the oil can be a major difference. Many Belgian fries were cooked in horse fat, or a combination of horse & beef fat. Although most American fries are cooked in vegetable oils, McDonalds previously used part beef fat. I would argue that using animal fats for cooking is one of the major differences between Belgian and American fries ... but ...


5

All of the sources I read say the same thing... what makes them different is that they're fried twice. From Saveur: Frites are the supercharged cousin to paltry American-style fries: made from soft Belgian potatoes called bintjes, they're thick-cut and—this is key—double-fried (in the olden days, in molten horse or ox fat, though modern options range ...


1

Tried making another batch today and here's what happened: First Test: I used potato starch (was finally able to get hold of the starch), and used that instead of sweet potato starch, true enough the result was perfectly crisp and crunchy similar to that of potato chips! Second Test: Used the same old starch (sweet potato starch) and skin turned out soggy ...


3

It's a late answer, but I do this all the time when I'm feeling lazy and don't want to make traditional roti. Heat up oil to 300 to 350 in a skillet .about 2 inches of oil. Or use your deep fryer at 350, just make sure it's large enough. The most important thing is your oil needs to be up to temperature. As soon as you toss in the tortilla it should ...


3

I would also cut down on the "Full Basket" to lessen the Oil Temp Recovery. Try just a few handfuls at a time to keep the temp above 325'F. Frying time per batch should only be between 1 - 2 minutes.


2

You could try par-boiling the fries first. Drop your cut yams into boiling water until they begin to soften (about 5-7 minutes.) Remove them and let the cool completely before frying. 12-14 minutes seems like an awfully long time to keep something immersed in boiling oil. The par-cook method, while increasing overall preparation time will increase the ...


0

Maybe look into an odor neutralizing spray. There's a brand called Ozium that you can get online or at a tobacco shop. It works really well and gets most smells out. A couple years ago, a roommate of mine got a fryer for the holidays and went rampant with it and left my kitchen/apartment in the same condition. He went out, got a can of this Ozium product, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included