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31

A lot of bacteria grows in the range of 40-100F (i.e. room temperature). It's definitely not recommended to defrost meat at room temperature. In fact, you are not supposed to leave meat at room temperature for more than an hour. However, defrosting in the refrigerator can take a long time and require you to plan at least one day ahead of time. I'm not so ...


20

I suppose that depends on what you're defrosting it for. The microwave (on low power) is safe and quick. The downside is that you're using a microwave, which means there's a good chance you'll actually cook the outside slightly in the process, and you're killing enzymes that are normally part of the flavour. The lower the heat, the less the impact of ...


19

Put the meat in a sealed plastic bag, place in a bowl in the sink, fill with cold tapwater, then set the tap running in a thin stream with the water overflowing the sides of the bowl. The moving water will safely thaw the meat through convection. Make sure you get as much air out of the plastic bag as you can. You might need to put some weight on it in ...


14

There are two safe ways to defrost, one more rapid than the other. First method is to defrost in the refrigerator. This keeps temperature below 40 degrees F, in the safe zone. This will, also, take a while. Second method is to defrost in the sink under cold running water. The water doesn't have to run rapidly, but it should change regularly. This will ...


12

If you dough is a disc shape: When I worked as a pizza cook at a popular fast food pizza place, we would put our dough still frozen into what we called a proofer. It was basically a heated cabinet around 130 F. It would defrost and have it's final rise in there. After that we would stretch to make the pizza. You could probably replicate this by putting your ...


11

Technically or practically? Technically, it's not the best idea. The purpose of thawing is to bring the meat above 32 degrees but not above 40. (Bringing it to room temperature is a separate process, done only immediately prior to cooking). In a refrigerator, the temperature is probably between 35-45 degrees, so there's no problem. On the counter, ...


10

If you're really in a hurry then you can't beat the microwave. It might defrost a little unevenly, but assuming you plan to brown it or something afterward, then that will take care of evening it out. The microwave is perfectly safe; the key point about food safety here is not allowing the meat to sit in the "danger zone" (basically more than a few degrees ...


10

Yes, it is perfectly safe (as long as you continue to thaw the meat in a safe manner, as in the refrigerator). The marinade will not begin to have much effect until at least the outer layers of the meat are thawed, but it will not otherwise have any side effect. It may get slightly better penetration due to the changes in the texture of the meat from ice ...


7

Don't. Ice cream is hard. It melts slowly. Instead, focus on scooping. Get the largest spoon you have, or ideally, an ice cream scoop. Fill up a cup with boiling water, or as hot as your faucet will get it. Dip spoon/scoop in the water. Scoop. Dip. Scoop. Shake off excess water as you go. Like a hot spoon through ice cream.


7

Well, you can always add some broth -- chicken would be good. That would allow you to control the salt more so than using boullion crystals. As far as cooking the vegetables, it depends on whether there are already pieces of vegetables in the frozen soup. If yes, then you may want to cook your add-ins first so that the stuff that's already in the soup ...


7

I would think that USDA would err on the side of conservative when it comes to safety, especially with no financial interests in the equation http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Big_Thaw/ Perishable foods should never be thawed on the counter, or in hot water and must not be left at room temperature for more than two hours. Even though the ...


7

It's reminding you that flipping meat halfway through the defrost cycle will help prevent the bottom half cooking, while the top remains frozen solid.


7

There are four methods for thawing frozen foods which are recognized as safe: In a refrigerator In the microwave Under cool running water As part of the cooking process These four methods all meet the criteria that they minimize the amount of time the food spends in the danger zone (40-140 F, 4-60 C) where bacteria can grow. The pros and cons of the ...


6

The best way? Plan better. :) The microwave is rarely a good plan for quick defrosting, as you found out. I would suggest putting the container in warm to hot running tap water. The warmer the water is the faster it will melt, but it will also melt more unevenly - though nothing like the microwave. The important part is that the water is running, and is at ...


6

If you're unthawing them in your refrigerator (below 40 F), then you should be just fine. Most beasties don't reproduce at any significant rate below 40 F. There isn't a clean cut off point because it depends entirely on the existing level of contamination present in your meat. You should be aware that repeated cycles of thaw/freeze will really damage the ...


6

The very document you link to clearly explains the reason: It is important to use methods that will allow the entire mass to thaw evenly. Any method that allows one part, for example, the outside surface, to defrost before the inner portion is not acceptable, because the portion that thaws out first will be in the danger zone before the other portion is ...


6

Sauces separate when frozen for several reasons. If it contains vegetables, the plant cells rupture when the water in them freezes. This means the sauce gets watery and the taste changes as the contents of the cells escape. With emulsions, the oil/fat microdroplets clump together when they freeze. When you thaw the sauce, the emulsion is wrecked, ...


5

It it's not for immediate cooking, defrost in the fridge. The rule of thumb is for a piece of meat to spend no more than 4 hours (cumulative) in the danger zone (above 40 degrees F). A thin piece of steak won't take that long to defrost, so it's relatively safe to defrost on the counter and then cook immediately. A big roast or chicken on the other hand, has ...


5

If you're defrosting in a microwave, put the chicken in a semi-enclosed package (lid on but not sealed shut), this way the steam will help to defrost: Use Low Power or it will cook!!


5

A microwave is fine for pieces of chicken, particularly it's a newer one which automatically sets the time for you based on the weight of the chicken pieces. (and don't stop just 'cause you think you're done ... that frozen core in the breast won't cook and might ruin your dish. For whole birds, I go with the running water method -- mostly because my ...


5

As long as your normal marinating time isn't significantly less than the defrosting time, then I believe that'll work fine. If the normal marinating time is much smaller, then you'll end up over-marinating your meat; if the marinade is acidic that would produce undesirable results. If it's the same or longer, then you'll be marinating for the right amount of ...


5

As far as I am aware, you cannot recognize this in advance. What you describe is due to very damaged cell structure in the fish. The "water" are the fluids contained in and around the fish cells, which make the filets juicy. They flow out when the cell walls in the fish rupture. The reason for rupturing is that the fluids are water-based, and water ...


4

Screw the microwave. The only thing it's useful for is crappy frozen food and hot water for tea (and even for tea an electric kettle is better). What you want to do is put your chicken parts in a zip-lock bag if they're not already packaged, and drop that in a container that will hold it. Place said container under a slow-running tap of cold or lukewarm ...


4

No no no no. Bag idea. Don't defrost on the counter. Like a lot of people said already, 40-100 degrees exponentially causes bacteria growth. Yes proper cooking can kill a lot of bacteria, but nothing is guaranteed. Besides, certain types of toxins (eg spores) are produced by bacteria and aren't destroyed by heat, only way to prevent is to not allow ...


4

Let's start with the assumption that Safety is never in the balance. Safety has to be taken into account for any method that we use and that means that we want to keep any food that is time and temperature sensitive out of the danger zone. The danger zone is the temperature range from 40 degrees F to 140 degrees F. If you have plenty of time, letting the ...


4

If you have a cast iron griddle or large cast iron pan, you set the frozen dough on it to greatly speed the defrosting process.


4

Ignoring food safety for a moment referring to an example like How Clothes Dryers Work in most dryers air enters near the top, is heated by an element at the rear of the dryer but the air is actually being drawn in / out by a fan at the bottom of the unit. The internal temperature of the air ends up being about 175C so most of what is "floating around" in ...


4

Extract it from the container (run the container under the hot tap to loosen up the edges if necessary) and put it in a saucepan. Add a little bit of liquid (water, juice from canned tomatoes, milk... whatever would go with the particular curry you have) just to cover the bottom of the saucepan so it isn't getting heated dry. Put it on the stove on a ...


3

I wouldn't bother thawing them, unless they're going to be in a huge block otherwise. For pies with frozen berries, you really just need to cook them a little longer to make sure everything is done...If the top crust browns too fast, throw a piece of foil over it until the whole thing gets bubbly. I do this with blueberries and blackberries and...Well, I do ...


3

As long as your frozen cranberries aren't in a syrup, this should be just fine. The most noticeable difference would be the texture. The flavor will also be slightly concentrated due to the water loss that Michael points out.



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