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20

"Plastic chocolate" is a form of chocolate used for modeling and shaping decorative elements such as chocolate roses, ribbons and other elements for cakes and desserts. Take about 1 lb. of bittersweet chocolate and melt over a double boiler. When chocolate is melted, stir in 2/3 cup of light corn syrup. Mix until evenly blended and then set aside to cool. ...


19

Butterscotch and caramel are very different things. The taste difference between the two is far from 'slight' in my opinion. Caramel is typically made with granulated sugar, milk and/or cream, butter, and sometimes vanilla. The primary flavors of caramel are the sugar and milk/cream. Butterscotch on the other hand is made with brown sugar. It's primary ...


19

What you are looking for is spherification. You need to use a different hydrocoloid than gelatin. There are a couple of techniques you can use. If you want solid spheres, you can mix your liquid with agar agar, which is readily available in the asain section of the grocery store, bring it to a simmer, and then use an eye dropper to drop the liquid in to a ...


18

Salt has unique properties in how it interacts with the taste buds. While it has its own "flavor" it also has the ability to enhance some flavors while blocking your ability to experience others. While I could go on, all I would be doing is repeating much of what I learned watching The Food Network's Alton Brown. He goes in depth for the episode "The ...


18

It's just decorative, in a bit of an extravagant way. The leaf is so thin that you can't really tell it's there when you eat it; you're not really eating much metal. That's also why it's not that expensive - for example I see 25 sheets for $49 on Amazon. Not cheap, but if someone uses one $2 sheet for a few dozen truffles sold for a dollar each, it doesn't ...


17

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


16

The names are used for different stages of caramelization of white or brown sugar: Butterscotch = caramelized brown sugar 239°F-257°F (115°C - 125°C) Toffee = brown sugar caramelized to hard crack stage 302°F-320°F (150°C - 160°C) Caramel = white sugar heated to the point it browns, which starts at 338°F (170°C) The ...


16

First of all, the names vary a bit from country to country, or the ingredients do. I'll explain the most common names/ingredients. The main difference is in the ingredients used. Sorbet is basically water + sugar + fruit, while ice cream and gelato is milk/cream + sugar + fruit. So the last two are more 'creamy', while sorbet is more 'icy'. You can say ...


14

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


13

The rest period hydrates the starches in flour, giving the dough a firmer and more workable texture (there is some very minor gluten development, but its mostly the expansion of the starch bundles with water). In many cookies, the flavors will also mature and improve, especially with cocoa in the recipe. In many recipes, the cooling from refrigeration is ...


12

If the reason you don't want to use a toothpick is that it leaves a big hole, you can buy a cheap little item called a cake tester that is just a thin piece of wire with a little handle. It leaves such a small hole that as to be unnoticeable. As a bonus, it is quite useful for checking the doneness of vegetables. This is the one I use.


12

So I made this. It worked out really well. The recipe leaves some room for improvement, but overall, I was happy with the way it turned out. I rolled out the chocolate, pressed crumpled tin foil in, and then made the nori. The dish put together. Dessert for four. I used reverse spherification of peach puree for the caviar, sliced peaches as ...


12

I can see this as being similar to a sweet potato pie. Best bet in that case would be to cook the carrots, then puree and mix with eggs, milk, etc. just as if it were a sweet potato or pumpkin pie. Two alternatives that come to mind would be to treat it like a fruit pie, as you say. Because of the texture of the carrots, I would grate them with the large ...


11

The dessert pictured above definitely, definitely has gelatin in it. That will change the mouth feel on the mousse slightly, but it might be what you are going for and will provide some of the stability that you are looking for. To have it hold a form like this you will need a recipe that requires gelatin; I would recommend gelatin sheets if you can find ...


11

It's definitely asking for rolled oats, not prepared oats. It's just like oatmeal cookies. It's up to you whether you use normal rolled oats, quick-cooking, or instant. I use normal in my crumbles, but you might choose quick or instant if you think the normal retain too much texture. Personal preference! They'll all work, though, so you can just use what ...


11

The fast food chains that sell pre-cut apples in bags use Nitrogen or similar food inert gas. But I can't see this being practical in a normal kitchen Acid is the answer, try slightly less noticeable acid sources such as fresh (as in you squeezed it) orange or pineapple juice They should not taint the taste so much if you just lightly brush it on the ...


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that ...


11

Peel the rhubarb before cooking - you can strip off the outer skin from the stalks quite easily. That helps. EDIT: My wife told me to explain why. In Yorkshire, the rhubarb capital of the world, you can buy "forced rhubarb", which has a tender pink skin because it is forced to grow up through dark tubes towards the light. Because "garden Rhubarb" is not ...


10

The ideal temperature for whipping cream is between 35 degrees F and 50 degrees F (1 2/3 degrees C to 10 degrees C). In order to maintain this temperature, you may want to chill your bowl and beaters in your fridge until cold, but you should be able to whip cream just fine as long as you do not let it rest once you remove it from the fridge. Above 50 ...


10

Not only does salt affect the taste of baked goods, it reacts with the dough chemically to slow the action of leaveners, and to change the texture. Here's a brief synopsis, which discusses how salt has an effect on water absorption, as well : http://www.progressivebaker.com/resources/tips_effects_of_salt.shtm


10

I've eaten from the creme brulee cart in San Francisco before, which is basically a food cart that sells nothing but. They're presented in one-serving disposable aluminum ramekins and the crunchy top comes from caramelizing as people order. I've seen similar in bakeries and restaurants that sell creme brulee to go. Presumably this is far easier than cutting ...


10

You already have stated the major reason: because it looks attractive. It really is nearly that simple. Someone cynical would note that sociologically, consuming prestige and expensive items can be a way to establish rank and dominance, so chefs serving that audience may accommodate that need. It is an example of conspicuous consumption — in this ...


9

If you make the base neutral - a typical Neopolitan dough would do - you could use white chocolate shavings to give an appearance of cheese as well. I would keep the amount light. While looking to verify this idea, I found a recipe that gave me a few more pieces of inspiration. Instead of carmelized sugar banana slices, try dried fruits (strawberries, ...


9

Pie and tart are regional (North American versus Western European) terms for essentially the same thing. Some will argue that the pans make the difference (see below), but I don't buy that story. There are some stylistic differences that appear quite often, but nothing that makes them truly different things: Pies tend to be deeper, and have more filling ...


8

In the US, traditional Tiramisu needs to be made at home because it uses raw eggs and it would be too risky for a restaurant or bakery to sell. For years I have been making the Williams Sonoma recipe.  To get the tiramisu to come out firm I had to: Soak the lady fingers just so.  Pour a thin layer of coffee onto a plate.  Practice rolling the lady fingers ...


8

In order to get the chocolate to harden correctly, still look shiny, and have that nice snap when it is broken, you need to temper your chocolate. There are many methods for doing this, but the seeding method on this site is most people's preference: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/155/Tempering-Chocolate After that you tempered chocolate, ...


8

You say that they were frozen with the stones? I think it is the freezing of the stones that caused it. The stone is where most of the "artificial", almondlike flavour sits, just like with apricot pits and almonds. I bet that when they were frozen, some of them cracked and [insert correct name of flavour agent] seeped out into the flesh of the fruit.


8

The comb, which is beeswax, holds the honey. Honeycomb is used for decorative desserts, placed on or along side nicely arranged fruit, is used as a spread on toast or bread or crackers and is served with cheese platters. As a child I loved honeycomb, would pop a hunk in my mouth and chew like gum until all that was left was the wax, and either spit the wax ...



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