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19

I don't see anything in the question that is peculiar to pizza dough. Anything I answer will apply to any kind of yeast-risen, glutenous dough. The goal with any such dough is a well hydrated protein matrix that has been arranged in sheets that will trap the gas produced by yeast. If the yeast is dead it won't be able to produce gas and your bread will be ...


17

A non-exhaustive list of ways to get your bread to rise when it's cold includes: Just let it rise slowly over a long period of time, which does give you good flavour but requires serious patience Put it in the airing cupboard, assuming Australian houses have such things, but in the winter the hot water tank will keep it nice and warm If it's still in the ...


17

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


15

Optimal yeast growth happens at around 37 degrees Celsius (98.6 degrees Fahrenheit), but dough will rise at any room temperature. As the temp rises, the yeast becomes more active, which is why you'll sometimes see recipes call over overnight rests in the fridge, where activity slows or stops. Yeast dies at anything above 50 C (122 F). The important thing is ...


14

Allowing the bread dough to rest for the 18 hours will allow the bread to develop the gluten which gives the bread the chewy texture. This will reduce the need for kneading. Personally I have experimented with this method but with a shorter resting time (8 hours) and have achieved crusty, chewy-textured bread. Note though that the crustiness of the ...


14

"Shortness" in dough refers to its tenderness which is influenced by the amount of fat as well as sugar. If your quiche recipe is calling for a short dough, it would be referring to a higher ratio of fat since pastry for quiche typically doesn't include sugar. Both fat and sugar minimize and break down gluten development which results in "short" protein ...


13

The answer depends upon the type of pizza you're making: 00 Flour (Caputo or San Felice are two common brands) is an italian flour that's finely milled. It's low in protein content and performs well in high temperature ovens (e.g. coal fired, wood fired ovens). I usually don't cook 00 under 700F. 00 Flour is almost always used in Traditional Neapolitan ...


13

Salt in high concentrations can kill yeast yes. So can sugar, though salt is so much better at it. You see both are hygroscopic, meaning that they suck water out of stuff. This induces osmotic stress to the yeast cells leading eventually to cell breakdown (aka death). On lower concentrations salt will throttle the yeast fermentation producing a richer and ...


13

You're going to have more issues with cookie-spreading than anything else, because your fat is going to get all warm. If you have a lot of fat in your cookies, you're definitely going to want to put the dough back in the fridge. If the dough is a hard dough, and you don't expect your cookies to significantly change shape during cooking, I wouldn't worry ...


12

If you dough is a disc shape: When I worked as a pizza cook at a popular fast food pizza place, we would put our dough still frozen into what we called a proofer. It was basically a heated cabinet around 130 F. It would defrost and have it's final rise in there. After that we would stretch to make the pizza. You could probably replicate this by putting your ...


12

Kenji over at Serious Eats gives some of the best "pizza science" lessons on the Internet. Here's a good article on the role of yeast and fermentation in pizza dough: http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/09/the-pizza-lab-how-long-should-i-let-my-dough-cold-ferment.html In short, time and kneading cause proteins in dough to form an elastic network of ...


11

As a rule of thumb- you can comfortably hold your finger in warm water. 100°F (38°C). Yeast wake up well at this temperature. http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/yeast_temp.html This time of year my house is 80°F (27°C). but I heat my water a little past that (~120°F or 50°C) to compensate for cooler ingredients- you really want the dough to be ...


11

I work in a fine dining restaurant, and the standard implement is a bench scraper AKA a dough knife AKA a bench knife. It's basically a stiff, 6" wide sheet of stiff metal with a handle, and can pressed or rocked down on the counter to cut dough into portions. It can also be used to move shaped bread or rolls, cut pastry, fold sticky doughs, and scrape off ...


11

Your metal bowl sitting in your 70°F room is 70°F (at least, if its been sitting there for a bit). Your plastic bowl, or glass bowl, or ceramic bowl, or any other bowl sitting in the same room is also 70°F. They're all actually the same temperature. Now, given, when you touch the metal bowl, it feels cooler than the plastic one. This is because your finger ...


10

Kneading does two things. First it mixes all the ingredients uniformly. You have to do this no matter what, but you only really have to do it enough to mix the ingredients. If you keep kneading beyond the mixing stage, you are applying energy (which equals heat) to the yeast which makes it ferment, generating the tiny bubbles which make bread fluffy. The ...


10

If the starter is "bubbling nicely" then you may be already there. Bread rises because the CO2 produced by the yeast is trapped by the protein in the dough. If you see bubbles then your starter is already producing the necessary CO2. A starter has so much water in it that the protein doesn't trap the gas- thus you see bubbles rise to the surface. If you ...


10

The goal is to keep the surface of the bread from drying out. A wet towel works fine but plastic wrap is cheaper and easier than constantly cleaning wet towels. I have used both methods and haven't noticed a difference in the bread produced. In very dry climates, when I made bread with multiple rises I sometimes had to redampen the towel which was an added ...


10

I don't think you're doing anything wrong, I think the dough is just more slack than you're used to. As @Jay noted, it can take some practice to work with a wet dough. But once you do, you'll be rewarded with a much more open crumb and a better final product. In my experience, I've found wetter dough and higher oven temps = better artisan bread (in ...


9

The best is the Italian Tipo 00: http://www.fornobravo.com/brick_oven_cooking/pizza_ingredients/flour.html. If you can't find that flour, I find a mix of bread flour & semolina (ferina) works very well too. This is my favourite pizza dough recipe: http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/pizza-recipes/pizza-dough


9

That's just a bad pizza base recipe. My family recipe is totally different. Not sure if I can post recipes here, but anyway here's a link to something similar http://www.recipepizza.com/doughs/pizza_dough.htm You can use sugar or honey, it's just food for the yeast. You can use 2 or 3 times more olive oil to make a smother dough Some extra tips: In my ...


9

How to throw dough, a basic step by step guide. Make sure you have a dough that can stand up to being airborne. This means that you need a high gluten dough. You can throw wetter doughs as you get more experienced but they require much more precise hand placement and are much less forgiving. Make sure your dough is fully risen with out being "blown". It ...


9

You won't get a buttery taste from adding butter to the dough. Even in fat-rich batters like pound cake, the difference between butter and a neutral fat is subtle - it is there, but it doesn't taste like biting into a buttered toast. And in a pizza, you can't add such amounts of fat to the dough, because it will interfere with gluten production, resulting in ...


9

My targets for the final dough: when I stretch it over my fist, once it has got to the size where it covers my whole fist, it starts to stretch under its own weight if the inside of the dough is exposed it will stick to hands/surface need to use semolina/cornmeal to transfer the pizza around contains lots of visible bubbles before stretching, with the ...


9

I am an Indian and we make dough for everyday bread at home. It's easy to knead dough; you just have to take care while adding water. Do not add all the water you have, and add water slowly and steadily. For pizza dough I follow these steps: Mix yeast in warm water, add sugar to this water. Observe this mixture - as soon as you see bubbles, it is ready to ...


9

Cookbooks describe the state as "smooth and elastic" I think this is a reasonable description. When the dough is first mixed it is very wet and sticky. As it is mixed you can see a lot of clumps and heterogeneous textures. As the proteins in the flour mix with water they form gluten and the kneading folds the elastic gluten over itself again and again ...


8

Using a high-gluten flour will allow more of the gas bubbles formed by your leavening agent to be trapped making an overall lighter bread that is stronger too. This is generally a desirable consistency for pizza doughs.


8

You're on the right track! Start adding your flour in the bowl as you did and when you can remove it without it being too tacky then start working it on a cutting board or countertop as you continue adding more flour. Sounds like maybe you pulled it out of the bowl too soon. As for a specific ratio of flour to potatoes/veg. that's going to depend not only ...


8

The flour/water ratio in the recipe you quote seems off. The "normal" bread ratio, which includes pizza, is 5 to 3 by weight. Your recipe has less than 17 ounces of liquid so the flour should be 28 ounces or less...2 ounces may not seem like much but it can make a huge difference. And, of course, I don't know that you weighed it. If you went with 6 cups, ...


8

You really need the dough to double in size for it to not be overly tough. 30 min might be enough time under some conditions, but it's not always; if you're in a rush, you might be better off making a biscuit dough rather than a yeast dough. To ensure a good rise, I'd recommend the following: Make sure to use warm water. I run the hot tap 'til it feels ...



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