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1

I thought at first that protein content was very important, but later I realized that it isn't so.Between 7-10% is good. Some (1%)salt and baking soda(1%). 10% needs a little more kneading and more water. Two things are really important: 1- humidity. Dough must have humidity all time, don,t let it get dry. 2- kneading technique.perhaps you are not ...


4

Taste the uncooked pretzels. That's the key. The baking soda won't affect how they bake; if the uncooked pretzels taste OK, they'll be fine. That's my opinion, there is disagreement, see the comments. If you do end up baking them, we'd love to hear the results. As Didgeridrew mentions in comments, skip the soda in the boiling step. If the pretzels taste bad ...


2

This seems like a great use of frozen pie crust, the ones that come in a sheet not pre-formed in a tin. This would certainly reduce the time and effort on your side.


5

Based on you mentioning curry and bread, have you thought about either chapatti or roti? Asides from them being Indian bread and so complementing your curry completely, they are quick and easy to make a little kneading but will take less time than making pastry or biscuit dough. Just make the dough, roll out into a few rounds, fill one half, then fold the ...


6

Many filled doughs don't require long resting times (maybe 30min to an hour), but they generally do require a little bit if kneading to make sure they're sturdy enough to hold a filling. If you have a stand mixer or a food processor, you likely won't need to do any hand-kneading. I'd recommend looking at recipes for either empenadas or samosas. (Look for ...


7

Yeah, how about biscuit dough? That's a common way to do a quick and easy chicken pot pie. It might be a little tricky to actually enclose the curry in the biscuit dough, but it should be doable. For reference, here are a couple of "pot pie" recipes that use biscuit dough on top of the filling: Add a Pinch (from scratch) Bisquick (Using Bisquick brand) ...


0

where is the oil? you are missing oil in the mixture, that dough seems awfully plain and very boring, I would add olive oil, and vinegar to the mixture, so this is ho wi would make it as follows, 4 gallons of water, 1/3 cup of sugar mix into water with a whisk, add your yeast cake, leave for 15 minutes, add the oil and vinegar pour in half the flour and ...


1

I think there is no reason except tradition. Cinnamon rolled buns just happen to be a common food in Central Europe, and they were exported to the USA. While I have no source to back this, I have frequently made breads where the cinnamon is kneaded into the dough. One common example is Peter Reinhart's Greek recipe from the book Bread Baker's Apprentice. ...


0

Try placing an electric heating pad on the counter on low setting. Then put the bowl or pans on top. Check periodically to make sure it is not too hot. works great on granite countertops as they are usually colder than laminate ones. Good luck :)


1

Your question regarding pizza thickness, as you are making Neapolitan pizza the answer is: When stretched, the center of the dough must be no more than .4 centimeters (±10%) in thickness. From: The Serious Eats Guide To Pizza In Naples But this has nothing to do with sliding it into the oven or baking steel. While you add the toppings on your pizza ...


3

I agree with GdD that sliding well can be accomplished with even a very thin crust loaded with toppings, as long as you have something it can slide on. Semolina does seem ideally suited to this. Stretching very thin can, however, make the dough more likely to stick just because as you stretch, you often expose more of the interior moisture of the dough to ...


3

Sliding well has nothing to do with weight or thickness, although too thin makes the dough prone to tearing. A generous spread of ground semolina under the pizza dough after shaping will keep it from sticking to your counter while you top it, and in your oven when you bake it. The grainy semolina will act as a barrier, keeping the bottom of your dough off ...


3

I agree with previous answers that the stickiness is probably related to the long second proof at room temperature. I know because I often make use of a similar technique, though I use a higher hydration dough. Thus, it's probably close to as sticky as yours, even though I don't proof as long. After a first proof overnight (or for a couple days) in the ...


1

Yes, you can refrigerate after the machine has kneaded the dough. Cover the bowl tightly. In the morning, take the dough out of the fridge and let it 'wake up' in a warm place for an hour, cut and shape, then either prove them again or bake straight away (a second prove will give you a lighter texture).


3

With a lean dough you can either use oil on the working surface and your hands to make it easier to handle, or a coarse milled grain like cornmeal or fine semolina. Personally I prefer semolina, as it is easier to clean up than oil, and cornmeal clings to the dough and gives an odd mouth-feel. A further point: you mentioned leaving the dough balls for ten ...


4

A super sticky dough is exactly what you want for pan pizza. Take a look at what Kenji from Serious Eats has to say about pan pizza dough. He uses a super-sticky, no-knead dough, but I bet yours would be fine for this application. I followed Kenji's advice to make this pizza, it was the best pan pizza I've ever had. Using the pan made dealing with the ...



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