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I use a silpat sheet (silicone with some sort of fiber reinforcement in it). As it's silicone on both sides, it grips the countertop well, but the bread dough doesn't stick to it too much. The only drawback is that you don't want to use metal tools with it, as you might damage the surface. (I avoid bench scrapers, and definitely no cutting on it) I don't ...


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Much of bread baking is not about surface but technique. A good surface is an asset but it's really convenience. When I am working with wet dough I don't even try to stop it sticking, I use the stickiness to stretch the dough. I find that I get very fast, good quality gluten development in about half the time as traditional kneading. I use a dough scraper to ...


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A vast array of surfaces exist but most people end up with either butcher block, stainless steel, or a natural stone such as marble. People choose stainless steel for its ease of cleaning and it's sanitary properties. People choose natural stone because it is typically colder (great for pastries), dough tends not to stick to it, and it looks great. People ...


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I see Joe suggested a method, but one important thing: don't freeze the balls, make discs and freeze them. You'll have much shorter thawing times that way. The way I do it is to freeze them laid out separately on different shelves, and once they are hard enough to handle without bending and sticking, put them into a case and store the case.


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I used to do it all the time. (but then I cut out gluten ... blah) Make the dough Let it proof once. Roll into smaller balls Place in a zip-top container Freeze It's easiest to let it thaw in the fridge overnight when you want to use it ... but because I make lots of small balls (maybe 2" / 5cm across), and then freeze them in sheets (16 to a gallon zip-...



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