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0

It depends on if you like it thin and crispy or thick and delicate so if its to your taste then go with what you like best and if you are judging it on how it lokks then you would want it to be golden brown crust with melted cheese.


0

There are many variables that could be at play here - some of the obvious ones have already been suggested, e.g., ambient temperature. The yeast fermentation process is very temperature sensitive, and can vary 100% in time for a change of less than 10 degrees Celsius, depending on your yeast strain. Other factors might include moisture level - if the dough ...


6

Let me suggest a totally different approach: Why not working with the cool conditions instead of against? You could let the dough proof for a long time, e.g. over night in the fridge. This allows for a lot less yeast and hence a less yeasty taste, which is usually desired. Also, more complex flavors develop during long proofing times. (There is a reason ...


5

In the winter, I usually get fine results proofing in a bowl with a second bowl inverted on top of it, and then putting the whole thing in the oven, turned off, and just the light on. The light bulb usually produces enough heat to keep the inside of my oven at about 90˚F (32˚C?), and that gives me a good rise.


5

50C (122F) would be a very high proofing temperature. The thermal death point of yeast is 55C, and you'll definitely hit a point of diminishing returns if you get too hot (most likely, you will have really rapid proofing on the outside of the loaf and an underproofed "core"). I would recommend setting your oven to the lowest temperature, and then once it ...


0

Go to youtube and check out the video on making rainbow bread here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9XDwTRE1dE If I were to do it, I think I would make separate batches of dough and add the coloring to the liquid. Color bread was all the rage in the late 50's 60's for bridal and baby showers and special party lunchs.


2

Here's what works for me. 50% wheat flour 50% either cornmeal, semolina, or rice flour This mix causes the bottom of the dough to absorb some of the wheat flour to prevent the bottom from being 'wet' and as @jolenealaska says, the other component acts like 'ball bearings' to keep the dough moving. I usually keep this mix in a shaker for general purpose ...


5

I can honestly say I've done this on many occasions. Especially for pizza dough, I defrost in the fridge for 24 hours in a cling filmed bowl which allows it to prove slowly through the day. Never once had an issue with it.



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