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It should be safe to skip the punch down step. In fact, Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François, who literally wrote the book (or at least a book: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day) on making pizza dough ahead of time, strongly encourage us to never punch down. Actually, if you search their website for the words "punch down," you will find that it ...


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You are going to want to let the dough rise as much as possible before applying oil. (The first scenario) This is so cracks and unoiled patches do not form in the rising process. If this is not possible, apply a little more oil to allow it to cover the increased surface area better, but do not use too much.


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...as long as it needs to, depending on a wide variety of factors. You can shape it for baking, put it in the fridge, let it rise, pull it out of the fridge and put it in the oven - no warming up time at all. If you are going to punch down/knead/form after it comes out of the fridge, you can do all that cold, and let it rise as long as it needs to before ...


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A mix of clarified and ordinary unsalted butter works well. I used clarified butter that was simmered for a long time to be sure the water was thoroughly removed, just to the point where it stops sputtering, and the solids in the bottom begin to brown. If the unsalted butter has a fat content of 80% and clarified near 100%, then a 20% clarified to 80% ...


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I don't know how fast water will evaporate from butter, but leaving slices of your butter exposed to (dry) air for half a day could be a low-effort way of reducing water content? The butter would discolour slightly, but there shouldn't be noticeable off-flavours that would affect the dough. (I've successfully used a fan over egg-whites to rapidly reduce ...


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I haven't tried this, but it could work... Since the difference between European butter and American butter is fat content, maybe you could do a combination of butter and shortening. American butter is normally 80% fat (or more). European butter is normally 85% fat (or more). Shortening is 100% fat (it doesn't contain water). I wouldn't use all shortening ...


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Not clear what you mean, terminology is non-standard. I'm going to guess you mean what the rest of us call resting or relaxing the dough when working/forming it. If you overwork dough, the gluten strands that hold it together will tear and break. If you stretch and work the dough until it's springing back, but has not torn, and then let it rest for 5-10 ...


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Preheat the oven to 200 degrees (F), leave it there for 10 minutes. Shut the oven off. Make your dough, and when you're done kneading, the oven will be nice and warm, but not too hot. Works great!


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I don't think the Australian winter can beat our harsh Canadian winter. One suggestion is to switch then oven light on or to make use of a 60 watts incandescent bulb using an extension wire through the door gasket to keep the oven warm. This will keep the oven warm for an extended period. Or buy a bread maker! (Which I only use for bread kneading only).


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No. Sodium bicarbonate isn't alkaline enough. You won't have traditional ramen unless you were to use sodium carbonate. You will end up with a noodle with less bite if you were to use baking soda. Just bake the sodium bicarbonate at 400-425F (not in a low oven like another poster is claiming) for 30 mins to an hour till its all become grainy rather than ...


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Over the years I have extruded pasta hung on poles and let dry for 12 to 24 hours. Room temperature and humidity is what it's all about I have found that on humid days the pasta dried slower and was very strong. On low humidity days it would break and not be strong at all. I haver extruded over 100,000 pounds using semolina eggs and water. Weigh your ...


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I don't think there's anything wrong with your pasta dough. It's on the dry side of the spectrum, which makes it go through the roller easily without sticking, but it won't work well in an extruder. The edge cracking is normal, and you can always cut it off if desired. You can reduce cracking by working it to the full width of the machine at the ...



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