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0

Usually I begin by mixing with my hand the dry ingredients together, especially the yeast. Then I make a 'well' in the middle and add the wet ingredients and directly place the dough hook to start the stand mixer. You can check out my link as I have included photos and videos to show how the dough looks and eventually feels through the kneading process. ...


0

I agree with ElendilTheTall that we should not use a fixed time to identify a well-kneaded dough. A lot of factors such as brand and type of ingredients used apart from weather climate and temperature plays a part in the development of gluten. If you want to see how a well-kneaded bread dough should feel and look like, you can check out my link, where I have ...


1

Stuck Dough Follow the below process and stop when you have found success: Shake the peel back and forth Gently lift the nearest edge and blow under the dough to give it lift More shaking Toss your favorite non-stick agent under the area such as semolina/flour/cornmeal More shaking Gently blow again and wedge a spatula under the area Add even more ...


9

Ok, this is going to be long. And you just wanted to fire up your oven and slap the sauce on the dough...but bear with me. Gluten The Holy Grail of elastic dough that can trap all these nice bubbles: CO2 from the yeast and steam from evaporating water. Fact is, gluten is basically a protein (ok, scientifically speaking not exactly, but close enough). If ...


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It's the flour that will make the dough stretchy than anything else. Try the same process with double zero or doppio zero flour. All the commercial pizza brands use this extra fine quality flour. You will be pleasantly surprised by the results. You can usually get the double zero flour in a super market or Google if you prefer ordering online.


5

Perhaps some baker's math is in order to understand what's happening here and what direction your fix should be aiming at: Original recipe: 4c flour -> 500g 2c water -> 480g This means your recipe has a hydration1 of 96%, which is really high, even for ciabatta. It's doable, though, as for example this post cofirms. (Typical values for ciabatta are ...


5

Your recipe should call for the dough to be folded a few times during proving. Do this on a thick bed of flour, and sprinkle more flour on top as you fold, and you'll find it will come together more and more with each fold. Remember, when it comes to bread, the wetter the better!


0

My aunt users my grandmother's recipe and they are the thickest most pliable and delicious tortillas I've ever had, similar to the texture and taste of Taco Cabana but thicker and tastier and she would laugh at the thought of using a steamer. I'm in total agreement with the the comment above starting with: "Bull-honkey" though my aunt does use some baking ...


1

In winter when the sun is not too hot, I put the bowl of dough into a glass fish tank which is in the sun. The temperature sits on about 35C (measured with old vacola thermomter).


0

The point of the yogurt in this recipe is both flavor and for the acid in the yogurt to react with the leavening agents in the self-rising flour (usually baking powder) so that the dough will rise. Greek-style yogurt is regular yogurt that is strained to remove most of the liquid (yes, it is whey) and you can do this yourself the way user33210 instructs. ...


3

You can make your own version of Greek yogurt and it will be even better than what you buy in the stores. What you need to do is buy "plain unflavored yogurt", preferably full fat or whole milk. Then get a cheese cloth, and put the yogurt into the cheese cloth that is covering a bowl (please make sure the cheese cloth or a very thin cotton type wash cloth ...



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