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3

At least in theory what you're proposing should work, however I wouldn't mix sodium hydroxide, calcium chloride, water and corn all in one pot as you seem to be suggesting. I'm not chemistry expert, but as I understand it sodium hydroxide and calcium chloride react easily when dissolved in water to form calcium hydroxide and sodium chloride. Having corn in ...


0

I prefer not to introduce plastic into my baking where feasible. I spend time and money and love on baking, using nice organic flours and all natural ingedients, and the plastic shower cap, although very effective, makes me think there are unhealthy hydrocarbons dripping on to the lovely dough. I vote for clean white flour sack lint free tea towels, dampened ...


1

I can think of one case where yeast doughs shouldn't suffer from mechanical mixing: If you're going to be rolling out the dough (eg, for filling & making dumpling-like products, or rolling balls for monkey bread), you'd normally end up compressing the air bubbles when rolling it. Mechanical mixing has the same problem, so the difference between ...


1

As explained in my older answer Joe linked in a comment, the purpose of stretch and fold is to align the gluten sheets, producing the typical structure of kneaded bread. Depending on your final shaping, you end up with either a sheetlike structure (e.g. in ciabatta) or with spirals/threads in kozunak and other braided breads. One reason to not do the ...


0

Having made everything without "benefit" of a dough hook for years before getting a Kitchen-Aid (which is no Hobart, dough-hook-wise) I'd say it suits everything. I have done all the items mentioned except "hamburger buns" (thick slice of homemade bread and I'm done, there.) On a longer view, I'd suppose there's a few thousand years of baking before the ...


2

If you are worried about the freshness of the cookie dough, why not just place the dry ingredients layered into a mason jar with a card on the side with instructions on what wet ingredients to add and how to complete the recipe. That way, you have a cute presentation, and you won't have to worry about when they are going to make the cookies.


3

I suspect the cookies are baked now, but still: If you increase the amount of dough, will you be in trouble? You could just add the sugar now, but that will most likely mess up the texture (still, they are chocolate chip cookies, they are always good ^^) Get the sugar you missed the first time. Calculate your recipe down to the smallest amount you can make ...


0

You can add the sugar now, what the issue is and will be is that the chocolate will get pulverized some. That's why chips or fruit is added last or folded in.


2

I can offer an example from work experience. When making flatbread, I shared this with a co-worker. We were docking the rounds to keep them from puffing up like little pillows, for this we want flat breads that are flat. Docking correctly allows for small "pillows" of air, yet the overall product does not rise much. I baked one without docking to demonstrate ...


1

I too have found that adding liquid gradually eases problem, but does not eliminate it. The dough does not get tossed around in bottom of bowl by the hook as it should, but clings to hook and only minimal kneading is happening. The issue is the bowl not being wider, and so the hook also needs to be slim elongated and screw like, not wide and to side of ...


3

No, there is no substitute for gluten, at all. The gluten + soft flour combination is itself a substitute for bread flour, so if you can get bread flour, as Catija suggested, use it. If you can't, you need another recipe. Especially if your goal is to "not make it complicated", don't use substitutes. Substitutes are always complicated. The easy thing is to ...


3

I do this every week but with breakfast buns. I mix up my dough, do the kneading and first rise, then shape and freeze immediately. Then, every evening, I take the frozen shaped bun dough out of the freezer, put it in the baking pan, and let it rise overnight. The next morning (6:30am), I bake it. I've been doing this for several years. It works great, but ...


5

Yeast can definitely survive in the freezer, yet timing for the final rising will be altered by unfreezing. After several attempts, I found it best to freeze viennoiseries such as croissants, pains au chocolat (croissants leavened puff pastry), pains aux raisins (danish leavened puff pastry) and brioches suisses (small brioches filled with chocolate chips ...


4

My experience dictates that dough should be frozen once it is developed but not proofed (after kneading, stretching or stand-mixing) so that it is ready to rise and be shaped after thawing. The recipe that I first followed recommended that the dough be smooshed flat to ensure it freezes quickly. As to whether you can shape a loaf prior to freezing, I am not ...



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