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10

I go into a lot of detail regarding steakhouse quality steaks in my answer here. Excerpt: Any steak you buy in the grocery store is minimally wet aged. The finest steakhouses dry age their beef. The difference? Wet aging consists of simply vacuum packing the meat (as in a whole side of cow) and refrigerating it for about a week. After that, it's cut ...


4

Don't see why you can't make oaked meat. Corned beef and salt pork have been around for a long time. The 'corn' referred to isn't actually corn, but is rock salt. Here is a good starting point if you want to make oaked, corned beef which doesn't require refrigeration: http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/food-preservation5.htm ...


4

I investigated the possibility of dry aging beef at home a while back and decided that in my small apartment, at least, I did not want to risk the possibility of spoilage or contamination. These are the resources I found at the time: Is It Possible to Dry Age Beef at Home has a list of steps and tips Dry-Aging Beef Pays Off With Big Flavor calls for a ...


3

Assuming by "dry cured" you mean you salted it and let it sit for a reasonable amount of time (hours to a day or maybe two), don't boil it. Bake it, roast it, broil it, grill it - all the seasoning you put in during curing will stay in. And assuming you don't overcook it (use a thermometer!) it will be about as tender and juicy as chicken gets. The whole ...


3

Don't eat it! The soup or the chicken. Chicken meat may contain bacteria (inside the meat, not just surface) and can grow. Even if you've kept in the fridge for the weeks, it can still carry enough bad bacteria to seriously harm you. From what I know, the meat and fat structure of chicken doesn't lend it to curing in open air and long term. If you are ...


3

Generally, any kind of aging helps the natural breakdown process. Moisture evaporates from the meat, leaving behind more flavor. The connective tissue in the meat breaks down and makes the meat more tender. Aging the meat past 10 days or so doesn't make it more tender, but it does increase the flavor.


2

Dry-aging is typically something done 'before' you purchase the meat. Unless you have proper machinery (sanitary, temperature and humidity controlled, room). I think the dry-aging process allows some moisture to escape from the meat, leaving more concentrated flavors behind.


2

Dry-aging primarily breaks down the connective tissues in the muscle, naturally tenderizing it. The concentrated flavor is just a result of the moisture loss that you've already identified. Neither of these should be affected by freezing in any special way. You'll want to be especially careful about further moisture loss, but as long as you properly ...


2

All the dry aging instructions I've encountered (Test Kitchen, Good Eats) have the cook replace the paper towel after the first 24 hours. I typically dry age my steaks for 4-6 days in the fridge and replace the paper towel after the first 24 hours. The first paper towel is soaked with liquid. The 2nd towels usually have a fraction of the moisture of the ...


2

Dry aging creates a certain amount of inherent waste: The weight of the cut being aged goes down significantly The outer portions become dry, tough, leathery, may have mold, and are otherwise essentially spoiled and must be cut off For this reason, it is only really practical to dry age fairly large cuts. So this would exclude chicken and most fish, and ...


2

Liquid Smoke, you can use it as part of a rub or in a marinade or brine to infuse a rich smokey flavor to the meat as a pre-treatment. A Rub is most likely to get you the results you want. note: I have hopes that using oak chips in a brine would work as well, this is an a quick solution to your question.


1

Freezing will not diminish the dry-aged flavor, barring you don't leave it in there for weeks and get freezer burn. However, the texture will be affected. When you freeze meat, the water in the meat becomes ice crystals, naturally, and those crystals do damage the meat a bit. The quicker the meat is frozen, the smaller the crystals and the less the damage ...


1

For cuts of meat you bring home from the supermarket, you're probably interested in dry aging. Dry-aging will allow the enzymes that are already in the meat to break it down and tenderize it without letting it spoil. If you're doing this at home, without any special equipment, you really need to do it in a refrigerator. If you let meat sit out at room ...


1

I don't know much about dry-curing in general, but dry-aging of beef, which is a similar process, has been studied in detail by Kenji at Serious Eats. Based on his findings, I would suggest you're running into a similar issue: So why does meat being aged stop losing moisture after the first few weeks? It's a matter of permeability. As meat loses ...


1

There are several variables that need to be considered to properly and safely dry cure meat...temperature, humidity, ph level, for example. Just on the topic of moisture loss, however...you will not be able to tell simply by looking. People who do this for a living can tell by touching...most of us weigh our product before hanging. In general, when there ...


1

Basically, it's concentrating the flavor of the meat by removing water, and tenderizing the meat by allow it's own enzymes to break down some of the connective tissue.



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