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33

I think the thing boils down to how much you need to get from the lettuce. If you demand the best of the best performance for your salad, you want to blot it dry with paper towels, so that the texture is best preserved and the appearance is undisturbed. For my purpose, in my kitchen, a salad spinner saves money (the paper towels), time (my time), and allows ...


7

Tarragon, basil, oregano, thyme, savory, and sage are the ones that I'm most inclined to use in their dried form. Generally the more resinous and strongly scented they are fresh, the better they'll be in dry form. Rosemary will hold its flavor dry but unless you're going to grind the dry product it's like eating pine needles. I prefer fresh rosemary ...


7

Surprisingly, the answer seems to be a qualified yes, however the texture is not the same. The dried gnocchi turned out to be much better if fried after boiling; see below. Here are the results of my experiment: I dried a small amount of the fresh Gnocchi by placing them in a 150 degree (Farenheit) oven for about an hour, then turning off the oven and ...


7

While you could probably do dried blueberries in a VERY low oven (150F), you'll most likely need to prop the door open slightly to allow moisture to escape. You'd be best to do them in an actual food dehydrator which will have a fan to expell the moisture being released from the food. Keep in mind however that if dried as they are, they will shrivel up ...


7

I'm assuming you're wanting to make classic dried sausage such as the salamis and saucisson of Italy and France. Common salt is certainly the key to the drying process and a quarter pound per 10 pounds of meat is a pretty commonly used ratio, but you must also use a curing salt which helps protect against some of the truly nasty food poisoning bugs such as ...


6

I could answer this with the usual "it depends on the sausages" kind of answer, but I think it's important to raise a red flag. I would advise against trying to make dry sausages with a "seat of the pants" recipe and process. The chances of bacterial infection (botulism, most likely) and/or rot are very high if you don't do things right. I would be ...


6

There are three common ways to make sundried tomatoes: Sun - This can take days. Use a cheesecloth to keep the bugs out. Weather is obviously a huge dependency here. Dehydrator - Probably the most efficient method, but not everyone has a dehydrator. Oven - Use a cookie sheet and set the oven to 140-150F. This could be tricky depending upon the oven. ...


6

In the general case, it is not possible. As you cook meat past about 165 F, all of the proteins will have denatured and contracted, squeezing out moisture. This is what makes well done meat tough and stringy or rubbery. This process cannot really be reversed, although you can try to mask it with a sauce. In the specific case of certain cuts--the ones ...


5

It may refer to the use of lettuce in salads with lots of sauce or with very dense sauce, because it probably loses resistence (it'll break more easily.) This is just a guess though. Still, if you use it and like the results you get why stop using it because Gordon Ramsay says so?


5

With kale crisps you are ideally trying to dehydrate instead of baking. This saves the chlorphyll from degradation. Depending on your green/veg chlorophyll starts to degrade between 100F-185F (40C-85C). Now, 220F-240F (100C-120C) is as low as most domestic ovens go. However, if you are able to use a lower temprature, that would give you a greener result and ...


5

Dried vegetation usually suffers cell wall degradation. So when rehydrated all the oils and flavours will easily leach out. This is very desirable for vegetation you want to extract oils and flavours from Many "teas" are also partially fermented for additional flavour. This processes need to be stopped otherwise the whole plant will be consumed. Drying is ...


5

You can't close them up and expect them to stay mold-free, they will produce too much humidity. You will have to spread the peels on a flat surface, without overlapping. Do it on a slightly absorptive surface, and breathable is good too. The optimal setting would be a wire rack with a sheet of paper on it, but if you don't have a rack to commit to the ...


4

This page lists several methods for drying and storing herbs. A quick summary: Food dehydrator - a topic unto itself Air drying - Indoors or out, you need shelter, low humidity, and air circulation Sun drying - Low humidity, need to make sure the sunlight is not too intense Microwave oven or traditional oven - use very low temperatures


4

I sun dry things by putting them in the back of my car by the rear window during the day. The heat is intensified by the car and the fact that it's inside of something keeps bugs away. Place tomatoes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle lightly with salt, and dry.


4

One of the most memorable times I've seen someone dry herbs was Alton Brown on Good Eats: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GkD2GQ3Tg He creates this large contraption with A/C filters and a box fan... I've never tried it myself, but it was fun to watch. I typcially do it with a food dehydrator like this one: ...


4

As far as I know, drying is not necessary the option. In general, lollipops from the industry are coated with some edible powder, like starch. This prevents the sticking part.


4

In case of lollipops you want to use either sugar powder, starch or bees wax.


4

I've successfully dried peels in the oven at low/minimum temperature (150/200F for several hours) - although this is sort of imprecise. Just check them every half hour or so, and take them out of the oven when they are no longer pliable/bendable and make a hard sound when you tap them.


4

You'll have different techniques for different recipes. The most important thing is not to overcook it ... but with ground meat and ground poultry in particulary, you want to make sure you've cooked it long enough to be safe. For amalgameats, like meatloaf and meatballs, the common technique is a panade, breadcrumbs soaked in milk, and adding vegetables ...


3

You could use corn starch/corn flour, confectioners' sugar/icing sugar, or a combination of the two and just give it a light dusting.


3

I would guess that you will get a the same limited success for a couple of reasons. You might not have the correct heat required. Food dehydrators usually have an operating temperature around 140 degrees Fahrenheit. If you can get your convection oven to go that low, I don't think you would have a problem with accidentally cooking the food. Heat ...


3

I think the fact that I've never seen dried potato gnocchi, only vacuum packed 'fresh' potato gnocchi means that you can't. If you could surely dried potato gnocchi would be in the shops. It seems that the dried gnocchi is semolina gnocchi, and not potato although there seems to be a patent for a technique for drying potato gnocchi. If you try it let us ...


3

The biggest cause of mould or fungus is humidity (moisure, dampness, water in the air) and the leaves by nature will produce this as they dry. After all, the drying process is removing water from the plant. As long as you dry the herbs in an area with plenty of air circulation (to avoid humidity build up and take away any moisture as the leaves dry) you ...


3

Here's a great tip especially for turkey or chicken meatballs or burgers. For every pound of ground poultry, add 1 tablespoon of unflavored gelatin bloomed in 3 tablespoons chicken broth. Since the gelatin holds on to water, the meat will seem more juicy. Gelatin is made of collagen, that's what gives a good pot roast its unctuous feel. To bloom gelatin, ...


2

I would suspect you could use Alton Brown's Jerky method. I haven't done it with herbs but it worked great for the Jerky and should provide the same effect. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/beef-jerky-recipe/index.html You use a box fan and paper furnace filters. Lay the filters on the out side of the fan with your herbs between the layers ...


2

I've seen it done a set of stems tied together and hanged upside down (leaves pointing to the ground) on a string on a dry room. That said, I think fresh oregano is so much nicer and tastier than dried one that I wouldn't even bother to dry it.


2

A reason, I don't do it is that I usually store the leaves in the fridge and eat them over a period of a week and more. For that, I don't want them to be damaged mechanically, as even very small fractures rot a lot easier (as I also wrote in this post of mine). Since I'm way too lazy to blot it dry with paper towels, I just (very) carefully shake the water ...


2

Lemongrass is a terrific-yielding herb that grows in abundance and doesn't take up much room when drying. Basically chop at the stock, wrap with rope and hang upside down in your basement (as long as it's dry down there). It's dried uses are mostly for broths unless you ground it.


2

I have found that when drying fruit, is can sometimes help to maintain the texture by sun drying them, however, bugs can get in them unless you put them in a container where moisture can get out, sunlight in and bugs cannot go in.


2

Assuming you have a frost-free freezer (which dehumidifies the cold air), I'd experiment by laying sliced fruit on a sheet (maybe on a layer of waxed paper) and putting it in the freezer. Pull out a slice every day or two to check its crispness. The time necessary will depend on the type of fruit, its moisture content, the slice thickness, and the room's ...



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