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15

I agree with Jay's answer that one of the reasons is because of keeping the skin crispy, but I don't agree about the difference with other types of poultry and have a bit more background info. The root difference between duck and other poultry is that duck is much fattier, and most of that fat is stored under the skin. If you don't do anything about the ...


8

The main concern is keeping it from going rancid which is due to oxidation and heat. If you keep it at the back of the fridge in a container that minimizes the amount of open space on top it will keep a long time. You can also freeze it if you don't intend to use in the near future and don't want it taking up space in the refrigerator.


8

It's not entirely clear if this needs to be cooked after being wrapped. If you can cook it beforehand, and you really want something that has no taste at all, then you can't do much better than the technique Adria uses his tomato and black olive ravioli, which is basically to create paper-thin sheets of gelled agar and gellan, cut them into circles, and ...


7

Usually it is removed from the fat, and warmed in an oven. The exact instructions will probably be on the tin, but from memory I think it was about 15 mins @ 180c, as you only really need to warm them through and remove the excess fat. We have always served it with potatoes roast in some of the fat from the tin. Usually par-boiled, minced garlic added, ...


6

Assuming you didn't do some kind of "flavor injection" treatment, there is absolutely no reason why one part of a bird would taste radically different from another. I'm going to go with "Bad Duck." Cooking the bird slowly seriously reduces the possibility of a "hot spot" causing some kind of local taste variance. Breast meat will become overdone at the ...


6

Rare duck meat is safe to eat because it does NOT contain the same risk of Salmonella as does chicken meat. Primarily because ducks, as mentioned above, have not traditionally been raised in the same squalid conditions as "factory raised" chickens - salmonella is a disease that is primarily transmitted through dirt/dirty unclean conditions. Now, on the ...


6

Your question makes me think of demi-glace. From your question, I would say that you're trying to get a nice shiny thick sauce for your duck, one that tastes of red wine. If that's your goal, I would recommend you Reduce your stock down until it's about the total volume of liquid that you're going to want. The stock reduction should be roughly the ...


6

Duck feet will render plenty of gelatin because of the amount of cartilage, same as chicken feet. Any bird's feet are a good choice. The method for making stock is pretty much the same no matter what you put into it, so yes, you can follow your favourite recipe for chicken stock and substitute duck feet. The only thing to keep in mind is that duck feet, ...


6

It's absolutely possible to re-use it, although you will want to keep an eye on how salty it gets as you use it for successive batches. It will also, like any fat, degrade as you repeatedly heat it up, so you can't keep it forever. It should be good for at least three rounds of duck confit, though. Just strain it through some cheesecloth into a clean and ...


5

I would say that recipes technique sounds ok, but when I have cooked duck before I have always cooked skin side down on a medium heat till the fat all runs out and skin is golden but this always takes longer than 3 minutes more in the 10 minute range. Maybe this is because I use a lower heat. the recipe doesn't say how hot the pan should be. The aim is ...


5

Traditionally, the sauce combines several ingredients, one of which, as Bart mentioned, is Hoisin sauce. The other ingredients are: Sesame Oil Hoisin sauce Dark sugar or honey Water Dark soy sauce. Cornstarch You can usually buy this at your local Chinese supermarket, but it's easier and more tasty to make your own.


5

Duck generally has a considerable amount of fat, so there will probably be a good deal of fat in the pan drippings. That's not going to be a problem if you just blend the plums themselves; they're already full of water (i.e. juice), so they're not going to actually absorb a significant amount of the fat, they just might have a little fat film on the part ...


5

With chicken and turkey, the most important "trick" to cooking it is to make sure the dark meat gets done before the white meat dries out, and to make sure the skin crisps up somewhat. Duck is all dark meat, and has a thick layer of fat that must be rendered out. There is not a lot of danger in drying out the breast meat like with a chicken. Like Martha ...


4

A Turducken is not for the faint of heart. It takes a lot of work, but is a very impressive presentation. Everything starts raw, the duck and the chicken are boned completely (which you can ask your local butcher to do for you). The turkey is only partially boned, keeping the leg and wing bones. Make sure to start with a large 25 lbs turkey. First lay ...


4

You could have bought a wild duck. They can taste very fishy, particularly in the breast meat. The traditional way of getting the fishy taste out of wild duck is to cook it with a potato in the cavity but I don't think this makes very much difference.


4

I think grilling is probably a bad plan for duck legs; the fat content is a real danger like you said, and duck legs are tough enough you probably want to confit them or braise them. If you absolutely have to grill them, I would suggest confiting them at 200 degrees for three or four hours first (you could use veggie oil in a pinch) and then resting them in ...


4

In southwest of France, we serve confit with "pommes sarladaises", which are more or less fries cooked in duck fat in a pan. There is also garlic and parsley. You can use confit in "cassoulet" as well. This is something like chili con carne with white beans instead of red ones, onion, carrot, tomato, garlic (and many other secrets which change from home to ...


4

I routinely butterfly most poultry before roasting, not just duck. The biggest reason I have is the bird cooks faster and more evenly without the cavity. Since it cooks faster, there is less moisture loss. I also get the backbone to save for stock.


4

I have seen the same phenomena with cooked hamburgers and steaks. My research led me back to part of your question having to do with duck meat being characterized as red meat. What differentiates red meat from white meat is the amount of myoglobin in the meat which absorbs oxygen from the air. All red meat, when exposed to air, will turn bright red. I ...


4

In addition to the suggestions ElendiTheTall makes, various cuisines have a tradition of wrapping food with leaves (these are just some examples): Grape leaves, as in Greek cuisine, for dolmades Corn husks or banana leaves, as in various South American and South Western cuisines for tamales (possibly with a masa layer) Cabbage leaves, as in various ...


4

I found this recipe on supertoinette . The name of the dish is "Carcasses de canards grillées" which translates to roasted duck carcasses. It states below the name that "These carcasses of roasted ducks are a specialty of the Southwest!" If you use Google, you can translate the page and get the recipe and instructions. This particular recipe uses ...


3

If this is a full duck, I would suggest doing 1qt of stock, 1 bottle of wine and reduce it by half. For the wine may I suggest a Chianti as well as it should go great with your duck. Since you will be slowly reducing this sauce and for a learning experience every 5 minutes give it a taste. This will help you when you make other sauces to gauge times and ...


3

A quick peruse of the recipe doesn't show any red-flag items. Scoring the skin is indeed important. Another thing that is good to know is that duck fat, as you bake it, can turn really really black but this need not necessarily affect your dish badly - it doesn't look like this recipe will take things this far, though. Good luck and good eating! :)


3

Should last ages as the other posters have said. However make sure it's pure and doesn't have anything else from the duck in as that can go off earlier meaning you have to throw out the fat with it.


3

To grill a duck. Poke through the skin at 1 inch intervals so that the fat can drain easily. Use a drip pan filled with water directly underneath the duck to prevent flareups (make sure fire is not directly underneath the drip pan). Roast at 325 for 2-3 hours. Make sure internal temp is at least 165. Skin should be thin and crispy.


3

That must have been Hoisin sauce or Sweet bean sauce.


3

Hehe when I first read the title of your question I thought 'erm chicken eggs are from chickens and duck eggs are from ducks'. Duck eggs taste pretty similar to chicken eggs but they are likely to have a larger yolk. Some people say they have a stronger flavour but I haven't personally noticed this. I've only ever baked with chicken eggs but I've heard ...


3

Refrigerate it and the fat will get on top of the water.


3

So there is likely a few different things going on here. One, the method of cooking is important in answering this question because when roasting, especially something like a full duck carcass the innermost areas are going to obviously take the longest to reach a desired temperature. We have to also remember that the density of the bones mean they are likely ...



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