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8

Let's do some physics again: All culinary aspects aside, a roast is a (more or less) solid "blob" with a certain mass and volume. To get the roast to the desired doneness, you want to reach a certain temperature at the center of the meat. The crucial properties are the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of your meat or, very simply put, how fast ...


5

In several of the restaurants I've ordered peking duck at they offer it as part of three courses. They will first present the duck and cut off slices of the skin (with only a small amount of meat), this is then used with the pancakes. They will then take the duck away away and create a noodle dish with the remaining meat. Finally they use the everything ...


4

I suspect I should keep the same temperature but keep them in longer. No. The time it takes depends on the thickness of the largest piece of meat, not the total mass of meat. This is unlike the microwave oven, where the time does depend on the total mass, not just the thickness, because the microwave energy is a fixed unregulated amount and so more mass ...


3

Typically, the 'Peking Duck' dish only uses the crispy duck skin. The rest of the duck will usually be used in other duck-dishes.


3

In America that sauce is hoisin sauce or possibly (very much less likely) duck sauce or plum sauce. Any of these can be found for purchase easily, or they can be made from scratch.


3

I'm curious if this happened in the US or in China? When I grew up in China, most restaurants that I went to that served Peking duck would serve it in multiple dishes (they'd call it 一鸭三吃, "Yi Ya San Chi", or "One duck, eaten 3 ways", or two ways, or four ways, etc.). There is less waste this way, and they get you to order more dishes (and pay more) out of ...


2

My grandson adores duck pancakes so I tend to buy Sweet Hoisen Sauce in a squeezy bottle from the Asian supermarket. However, assuming this isn't easily available you can take any shop bought Duck / Hoisen sauce and customise although they tend to be very strong. I find mixing in some runny honey works best to counteract the strength. Ideally, heat a ...


2

In terms of food safety, temperature is the best and most reliable rule. 165F is good enough for duck, so yours is definitely all safe to eat. No need to pitch it, unless you think the texture is so bad you don't want to eat it. Pulling away from the bone definitely isn't a perfect food safety test. You'll definitely be able to get poultry to a safe ...


2

Okay, all these answers have strange spellings, it should be spelt Hoisin sauce, and should say 海鲜酱 on the bottle, it means "Seafood sauce" though contains no seafood, it's about 50% sugar. In Australia this is what you'll find in restaurants, and you'll be able to find the Lee Kum Kee brand at Chinese shops, and probably also in Coles: Actually, ...


1

Panang paste usually contains peanuts and tastes sweeter, so it depends on how you feel they go with duck.


1

It is true that traditionally Peking Duck is eaten with Hoison Sauce or Duck Sauce, however based on your description it doesn't sound like either of these. Hoisin Sauce is really thick, and Duck Sauce isn't a dark color. However I know that a lot of Chinese restaurants have special base brown sauce they use by combining (different ratios for different ...


1

For a more continental alternative to the ones mentioned here: a crepe. They're also easy enough to make from scratch from the most staple of ingredients. With enough skill, you can get them to less than 1 millimeter thick, and they can obviously be cooked. If you use half-water and half milk, and oil instead of butter, you can make the flavour even more ...



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