Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Yes, you can do that. Simply make sure that the duck isn't at room temperature for too long. 2 hours is the strict limit: you may wish to be more... sensible about it. I'd suggest slicing straight from the fridge, as it will not only be easier to get thin slices when the meat is firmer, but it will also de-chill quicker.


4

I found this recipe on supertoinette . The name of the dish is "Carcasses de canards grillées" which translates to roasted duck carcasses. It states below the name that "These carcasses of roasted ducks are a specialty of the Southwest!" If you use Google, you can translate the page and get the recipe and instructions. This particular recipe uses ...


3

If you have an RS232 scale you have a couple of very decent options for getting the data out of it. You could get an RS232 to USB adapter and write a script of some kind to request and pull the data - probably the easiest option - however it would not have network access, just access from the wired computer. If you genuinely want it to be on the LAN then I'd ...


3

What would a network-attached scale even do? You'd have to configure it to report to something, or have something else poll for it (and then you'd still have to configure it, either via DHCP, BOOTP or similar to set its IP address). It'd be a security nightmare, as it'd be like a network attached medical device (or old printer) that never gets updates to ...


3

You cannot find the correct final internal temperature for a whole duck, because it doesn't exist. If you stop the cooking when the white meat is tender, you'll have very tough red meat. If you cook until the collagen is melted, you'll get very tough white meat. With whole birds, it is more popular to go the collagen route. Especially a duck, with its ...


2

I would actually recommend you remove the breasts, regardless of when you will be cooking them. It is very difficult to get the duck breasts to a perfect 125–130°F, the legs to ~15° hotter, and to simultaneously render excess fat and crisp the skin when roasting the bird whole. Cooking the individual muscles separately greatly simplifies this. Also, with ...


2

See my relevant answer to a related question. In short, I would recommend avoiding roasting a duck whole—regardless of your skill level, and especially if you are a beginner. The only two advantages you get from roasting the bird whole are the theatrics of tableside presentation and also ease of preparation (i.e., you don't have to worry about butchering ...


1

Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn have a recipe for Duck Prosciutto in their Charcuterie book. They suggested only using kosher salt and leave it completely surrounded with salt for 24 hours. Rinse thoroughly, pat dry completely, wrap in cheesecloth and tie and hang for a week in a cool humid place. Add a day or two if beast is squishy. It should be ...


1

I looked at five recipes, none of them called for the foie gras to be chopped. You have already cleaned the liver, and have a different method chosen to form the ballotines, but I really liked these instructional photos from The Renaissance Girl Cooks describing the method from The Squire (a restaurant with two Michelin stars), and thought that later users ...


1

What I learnt from my neighbor: The most critical part also the most enjoyable part for the diners is to make the skin crispy. For this many factors should be taken into consideration (e.g. the type of oven you use, room temperature where the oven is, etc). But the trick for the skin to be crispy is how much the skin can become detached from the meat while ...


1

I consider myself a beginner, and I would not be comfortable trying to cook a duck. When done right, duck is one of the most wonderful foods. When done wrong, it is horrible. I consider duck a challenging meat because it is best served rare. However, you really should have the skin crispy. That takes some very precise timing to have the muscle rare but ...


1

This is the sauce I use as an adaptation from years of research: 1 T. minced fresh ginger 1 T. minced fresh garlic 2 T. hoisin sauce* soy,chili,garlic,vinegar BBQ like sauce* 2 T. soy sauce 1 T. sesame oil 1 scallion minced 1/2 ts. vinegar 1/2 tsp. sugar Mix well, paint on pancake with scallion brush and add cucumber strip.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible