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11

The primary difference between a dumpling and a noodle, besides shape, is leavening. Dumplings usually have either egg or baking powder to make them lighter. There's considerable bleedover in terminology here. It's reminiscent of the difficulty of defining "chowder". You're always finding a counterexample. I wouldn't be surprised if someone came up with ...


11

Spätzle originates from a region spanning Austria, Switzerland and southern Germany. I can tell you that here in southern Germany, Spätzle is definitely considered a sort of pasta. You can buy premade, prepackaged dried Spätzle, and it is always on the pasta shelf. So I'd say it is correct to refer to it as pasta, at least for historical/traditional reasons, ...


11

I am German, let me try to help, I've made many dumplings: There are four types of potato dumplings. They are called Klöße in northern Germany and Knödel in the south, both words mean the same. -Rohe Klöße (Raw Dumplings). These are made from raw grated potatoes. They are the most difficult to make. The surface is shiny and a bit slimy and you have pieces ...


8

The key to fluffy matzo balls is very simple. The density is directly related to the egg/matzo meal ratio. Too much matzo meal makes a golf ball. So, what you should do is add matzo meal according to whatever recipe you use less 1 or 2 tablespoons; mix and then add matzo meal a little at a time until you just "feel" the mixture change to a slightly ...


6

I would say Spätzle is closer to pasta than a dumpling - it's a dough similar to pasta (eggs, flour, water, salt). For me, the main difference between pasta and dumplings is that pasta is cooked in water and sauce is added later, while dumplings are often cooked and served in the broth which flavours them. The English language wikipedia page ...


6

Some pierogi recipes include sour cream in the dough; they also often have more egg than a typical basic pasta dough.


6

When cooking for for a crispy exterior you want to cook fast and hot. Most dumpling recipes I have seen call for similar ingredients and just about all of them say to boil for about 15 minutes in a broth or soup. If you are already doing this try mixing up the different ratio of ingredients. Cooking it longer will not make it harder with this cooking ...


6

Wikipedia says its for keeping the raw dough from turning brown. Alternatively you can use something called "Knödelhilfe" (Dumpling-helper), which is the anti-oxidant Potassium metabisulfite E224. (Kartoffelkloß (German), Potassium metabisulfite). I have done the recipe many many times without the sulfur, just heard about it for the first time, even though ...


6

As far as a I know, the lid is not really necessary for this style of dumpling at all. The only affect it will have is to increase the level of steaminess above the waterline, and very slightly prevent the dumplings from drying out. That is rarely a problem, especially if you flip the dumplings half-way through cooking. Your not quite big enough lid ...


5

Disclaimer: I have eaten them often (I live in Germany), but never made them myself. The versions with raw potatoes exist, but are uncommon. When you say Klöße in Germany, everybody assumes the cooked-potato variety. I checked the biggest German online recipe database, and the most popular recipe there uses starch, other popular recipes include flour. ...


4

Short answer: There should be no egg in Kartoffelknödel. It's usually 50% raw and 50% cooked potatoes. Grate the raw potatoes. Squeeze out the juice with a dish towel. Let the juice sit. Then mix the potatoes together. Drain the excess water from the juice and add the starchy rest to your dough. Add some more starch and semolina (i imagine breadcrumbs might ...


4

My Kartoffle Knoedel: I cook my russet potatoes with the peel. Make sure they are done but not overdone. As soon as they are done, they dried in a bowl. Or you can make baked potatoes. The secret to kartoffel knoedel is that the potato is as floury as possible. When they are cold I put them through the potato ricer, add pepper, salt and nutmeg, add ...


4

My mother (from Vienna) used to make these. We called them "gummi" knoedeln. You've inspired me to try to make them again. I don't have exact quantities, but here's basically how she used to make them. She put the RAW potatoes through a juicer and collected the potato "meat" left behind in the juicer. To this she added egg, semolina, salt and sour ...


4

The Dinty Moore recipe adds water to thin the stew so the dumplings will boil properly. Otherwise it will be difficult to get your dumplings to cook evenly as they won't sink into the thick stew and the stew won't have enough convection around them. I would follow the Dinty Moore recipe including the dilution. Pillsbury calls for 25-30 minutes but that is ...


3

I'm not sure about the texture (looseness), especially since those are two different methods. My best guess would be that it's just a flour measurement thing - moisture content in flour can vary, so the best thing to do is look for hints in the recipe about the desired texture (like "It should tear slightly as it falls from the beater"), and increase or ...


3

There isn't really a difference between them, or at least it is a very loose one, since dumplings can be regarded as a variety of pasta, such as tortellini. In Italian language, "pasta" commonly indicates just dried durum-wheat pasta or fresh egg pasta (such as spaghetti, maccheroni, etc.) while there isn't an exact translation for "dumpling"; stuffed pasta ...


3

I think gnocchi should work best with varieties of potatoes that you think of as mealy, dry, and fluffy when cooked. The most common mealy potato is russet. From On Food and Cooking: Mealy types (russets, blue and purple varieties, Russian and banana fingerlings) concentrate more dry starch in their cells, so they're denser than waxy types. When cooked, ...


3

My Polish mother-in-law boils them. The sweet ones are usually served with a bit of yogurt or sour cream, and the savory ones are often fried (after boiling) until golden, and served with onions and bacon.


3

The most common way here in Poland to prepare them is to boil them. Put them into boiling and salted water, wait until they start floating on the surface and then boil for 2-3 minutes (longer if they are frozen).


3

Dumplings should freeze very well. If you freeze the uncooked dumplings immediately and then cook longer the next day, you should have a similar result to your freshly assembled dumplings.


3

Anything that is normally cooked by simmering / boiling in liquid can be cooked in a microwave in the same way, if your microwave can keep the liquid simmering. So for pelmeni just put them in a bowl of salted boiling water (use a kettle or the microwave to bring it to the boil first), bring back to a simmer and cook on high for the same length of time ...


3

I grew up eating these and longing for more, they were a special 'treat' : My mother had special muslin sacks that she had made to help "drain" the raw potatoes that she had put through a meat grinder after they had been peeled washed and set on a tray to dry off . We would hang them to let the excess moisture weep out and then twist them to squeeze out ...


3

To get started, follow these steps: Cook the potatoes in their skins, and save the water they were boiled in. Peel while hot Use a ricer in a large enamel dish Sprinkle potato starch over the mix, but not much too (it is easy to get potato starch during the Passover season) The trick then is the "quill", a German wooden spoon that has a star shaped ...


3

Spoiled buttermilk wouldn't give a metallic aftertaste, but I wouldn't expect old baking mix to do so either. I would suspect that your box of bisquick is either contaminated, or you may have gotten a bad box. Sometimes manufacturing processes don't go right, so it might be that your box got far too big a portion of baking powder, or some other component ...


3

The metallic aftertaste is because the mix had a unbalanced baking soda to phosphate ratio. Whenever your finished cook product is either yellow or has a orange spotted tint within it you have a unbalanced mix. The phosphate must have something to react with. A unbalanced PH will cause the aftertaste. (Metalic =too basic) I believe that this mix uses a ...


3

Either would be safe. You will get better quality by freezing them uncooked. They should not get soggy due to the freezing, as neither the meat filling, nor the wrappers, are particularly subject to ice crystal damage. Gyoza are very small, so you should not need to thaw them: just begin the steaming phase right out of the freezer, and they will thaw ...


3

Are you truly wedded to those particular ingredients? If you're not, I'd consider replacing the dumplings with a shelf-stable gnocchi: Boil a bit more water than you'd need for thinning out the stew (maybe 2x as much, depending on how many dumplings you're cooking). Cook the gnocchi in the water Add the beef stew Heat through If the stew's a little too ...


2

You might try whole wheat pastry flour, too. It's usually used in things like pie crusts, and probably would be the closest in texture to white flour. Any grain other than wheat will not have the same amount of gluten and thus may have a vastly different texture.


2

I actually like the dense ones better (I know, heresy to some), but I've seen a number of suggestions for how to make fluffy ones. In addition to using seltzer, some people recommend: Adding baking powder Refrigerating longer Separating the eggs and beating the whites Adding extra oil As Dani suggested, handle them as little as possible Try any of ...



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