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63

Yes, it matters a lot. When you are separating egg whites, it is for whipping them into a foam. This foam is a protein-based foam, relying on protein ends hooking into each other. Even small traces of fat will prevent the foam from forming. Egg yolks contain high amounts of fat. Once an egg yolk breaks in your whites, you have to start the separation anew, ...


40

The traditional method is as Rumtscho describes. I got tired of this method for several reasons: Egg shells are dirty. Shells get in the egg (especially with home collected eggs which have MUCH thicker shells than store purchased eggs) Egg shells are sharp and it's hard to keep yolks whole. That method just takes too long if you need more than 2 eggs. ...


18

It can't be done after the yolk is broken/pierced. But, of course, separating white from yolk requires that you break the egg shell to separate them. Break egg roughly in halves along its "equator". Hold both halves broken side up, like cups. One of them contains egg white and the yolk, and the other only egg white. Empty the egg whites from the ...


17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


16

Dust the fruit with a little flour before adding to the cake. It will act like a glue and prevent the fruit from sinking.


11

If by the egg being broken you mean the shell, then yes, of course! If you mean the yolk, it's very tricky. And if you mean after you've dumped the whole egg into a bowl, possibly, but you have to very careful not to break the yolk. There are probably various ways of separating an egg, but I do it by carefully tapping it on the side of a bowl. Then, I break ...


10

According to wikipedia, the copper bonds to the sulfur in the egg whites, which has the effect of stabilizing the foam. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#Copper_bowl Cookwise by Shirley Corriher says the same thing.


10

This is the nature of meringue: they will start to fall apart as soon as you stop whipping. There are a few tricks to help it hold longer, but in general you want to have EVERYTHING ready to go as soon as the meringue is whipped. To help stabilize the meringue you can: Use a copper or SILVER-plated bowl to whip, or add a tiny amount of powdered copper ...


8

All you need is a small empty plastic water bottle. Break an egg on a plate, then squeeze the bottle lightly and bring it to touch the egg yolk. Let go, and watch the yolk slide into the bottle! Check out a video of this method in action.


8

The Yolk and White are very different and I would expect to see a significant difference in result. That isn't to say it will be bad, just different. The Yolk is the source of fat. It is going to impart flavor to the dish and provide a creamier texture. The White is mostly protein and so will set more, have more of a texture impact. If it called for ...


8

If you whisk egg whites to much they will definitely separate. Basically you are over tightening their stretchy proteins which squeeze out all the water. You are left with useless protein fluff floating on water. The flavor and odor will not change, however. That would be a sign off spoiling and unrelated to the whisking.


8

Folding is almost always done when you have one ingredient like whipped cream, egg whites, meringue, or similar which has had a lot of air whipped into it, and you are incorporating that with another ingredient. The folding motion is meant to disturb the whipped ingredient is little as possible, in order to retain the whipped in air, and thus the volume of ...


6

It will definitely make a difference. Yolks contain various things like fats and emulsifiers that affect the flavor and texture of baked goods. If you want more details, then tell us what you're baking.


6

The general things to keep in mind are: Don't mix a ton of the hot mixture into the eggs at once. Add a little at a time. Don't use too high heat. It's better to be slow about this than to have scrambled eggs. Don't overheat before you temper the eggs. Go only as far as the recipe says to. If it's too hot, you might be fine if you temper carefully, but ...


6

First of all, I suggest reading through our other questions on meringues and general egg-beating, to rule out any issues with your technique regardless of sugar content: Beating Egg Whites with Granulated Sugar Added for Tapioca Pudding How to minimise sugar in meringue Why do my egg whites separate after whipping? Making my meringues form peaks How can I ...


6

Sometimes covering fruit with flour is not enough, but for raspberries it should work. You can also bake the cake in layers - pour a thin layer of the batter without fruit, bake it for 5-10 minutes, just so the top sets, but doesn't brown, pour half of batter with fruit, bake another 10 minutes, pour the rest and bake until done.


5

The simplest way would be to put a small hole in the narrow edge of the egg (using small narrow object like tine of fork) and tilt the egg slowly. The white will come out of the small hole and yolk will remain in the shell. Once the yolk is broken, it starts mixing with the white, so its almost impossible to separate them.


5

Yes, as mentioned previously it is beneficial to whip egg whites in copper bowls BUT it is important to note that the impact on the egg whites from the copper is primarily beneficial for applications where the final product is going to be baked. You will generally not notice any increased volume in the whipped egg whites themselve. As the whites are ...


5

Yes, quite well -- I have personally made successful angel food cakes with frozen whites -- but if volume matters, they will not quite reach the maximal height of fresh whites (say, loss of 5-10%), and achieving peaks will take a little longer whipping time than normal.


5

The function of the chord, that is attached to the yolk, is to hold the yolk into place. To have the most uniform baking possible, you remove the chord. However, I never do. I keep it in with the rest of the whites and I've never had any problems with the finished products. So you can: toss it keep it with the yolk (a little bit of whites with the yolk is ...


4

You can replace the granulated sugar with confectioner's sugar, but due to that starch, you'll end up with an icing-like consistency. In fact, royal icing is just egg whites and confectioner's sugar. There is actually a surprisingly large number of variables when it comes to beating egg whites, with the amount and type of sugar being just one of them. I'm ...


4

As far as I know, real Italian meringue don't really have to cook in a strict sense, they only need to dry out the water present in the white. For that to happen you should cook them at a very low temperature (something between 180-200 Fahrenheit) and keep the oven door slightly open, so that the moisture present in it could go away and they could dry ...


4

Acids allow more air to be beaten into a meringue. In order to make meringue, the proteins in egg white must be denatured. In their natural state, the proteins are curled up into tightly packed balls. When the egg is beaten, they uncoil into long strands. These strands then begin to coagulate, or join together, with the help of the sugar you add. The air ...


4

To prevent this from happening, apart from what Jefromi says, check the temperature with a thermometer. Eggs start coagulating around 60ºC. If you keep the temperature around 55ºC you are pasteurizing the eggs at the same time.


4

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


4

Your pan is probably too hot, so the edges burn before the middle. Try turning down the heat some.


3

Try letting it cool in the oven. The tip is from the blog "The Little Teochew", which writes: Leave to cool in oven with door ajar, about 30mins to 1 hour. Sudden changes in temperature may cause the cake to cool too quickly and collapse. Further tips can by found in the blog post: Japanese Cheesecake


3

The method rumtscho describes works well with practice. But if you're lazy like me, consider picking up an egg separator tool - it catches the yolk and lets the whites fall through.


3

Put a pinch of salt in the egg whites and whisk them, and you should find it easier to remove a small quantity. The salt breaks up the 'gel' of the egg white and makes it more liquid.



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