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12

Eggplants differ in bitterness. You can cook some of them and never notice a problem. But other exemplars are quite bitter, and can overwhelm a dish. That's why it is a good idea to preemptively do something to remove their bitterness. I have read dozens of suggestions how to do it. Some are OK, others are downright terrible. Have you tried soaking ...


12

In Italian we call it parmigiana. Wikipedia says: Parmigiana or eggplant parmigiana (Italian: melanzane alla parmigiana or parmigiana di melanzane) is a Southern Italian dish made with shallow fried eggplant slices layered with cheese and tomato sauce, then baked. Variations made with breaded meat cutlets, such as veal and chicken parmigiana, have ...


9

In Britain (and France), the large purple varieties are known as aubergines. Other (pale and/or small) varieties aren't usually found outside of Asian supermarkets, where I imagine they are still referred to as brinjal. The name 'eggplant' is used in the US, Canada, and the Antipodes, mainly because the lighter varieties are more common there, which ...


6

For a recipe like this, that uses roasted eggplant slices, that you then top with some extra stuff, does not require much additional preparation. If you do it like the recipe you link to, you can just: slice the eggplant 1/2-1 inch thick, place it on oiled baking sheet (you can brush the slices with some oil on top too, sprinkle with some sea salt - ifyou ...


4

Eggplant should be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated. It will last 5-7 days this way. It can also be frozen 6-8 months with the following process: Wash eggplant, peel and cut into 1/3 inch slices; Blanch (plunge into boiling water) for four minutes in 1 gallon of boiling water to which 1/2 cup lemon juice has been added (to prevent ...


4

Another option is to simply lightly oil the eggplant with a pastry brush and bake or grill it, then add it to the rest of the dish as usual. It isn't the exact same dish, but it will still be good and substantially less oily. You could also bake the eggplant whole (poke a few holes and bake at say 375 until completely tender), then slice when done.


4

One old trick is to cook the aubergine in a pan without adding any fat or water. Just put them in a covered pan on moderate heat. After a while the aubergines will start "sweating". Uncover and continue cooking and stirring until they have lost about half of their volume. Then add oil and proceed as directed by your recipe. You will notice that, since the ...


4

"The most familiar Eggplants to us, the large dark purple ones, are called "Black Bell" or "Purple Globe." They're also called Globe Eggplant, Western Eggplant and American Eggplant. It's not known who exactly it was that thought this Eggplant was shaped anything like a globe." http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/eggplant#ixzz0yQtZ0gpf


4

The Chinese eggplant will have a thinner skin, less seeds (read: less bitterness); as a result, it will have an overall more delicate flavor. You can substitute a globe eggplant (the kind usually sold in American grocery stores) equally; just be aware you'll get extra "eggplant" flavor. Since the recipe you're using has strong flavors already, this ...


4

The varieties of the 2 eggplants shown in the pictures are not actually given, but to me the long variety looks like the Japanese/Chinese eggplant and the round variety looks like The Indian eggplant. By the way, there are many different eggplants out there. If you want to have a look, check out this: website. The Chinese eggplant has a thinner skin, more ...


4

I did the experiment complete with pictures, unfortunately I managed to to screw up the pictures, but luckily I took notes. I started with two very similar eggplants, globe variety, Like this: I sliced each of the eggplants into five slices of equal width, discarding the ends. I took one slice of each eggplant to make five pairs to treat differently as far ...


3

This is really about water content, not flavor. Eggplant contains a lot of water, and there can be plenty left after baking or grilling. If you then make a mashed/pureed spread like this, that water could make it a lot more liquid than you want. That said, if you really thoroughly roast or grill the eggplant, you can get enough of the water out of it that ...


3

In Turkish cuisine the tradition is to peal the eggplant lengthwise in zebra stripes an inch wide and to slice the eggplant into thick wedges which are then soaked in very salty cold water for at least a quarter hour. Just before cutting smaller and cooking you squeeze out the salt water. This should help against them turning dark and bitterness.


3

Modern eggplants are bred to be less bitter, so if you are buying store bought eggplant you shouldn't have to worry about it. I've never noticed my eggplant being bitter, no matter how I prepared it. If you are using heirloom seeds (i.e. you are getting the eggplant from your grandmother who has been growing the same variety for decades), then you might want ...


3

I slice my aubergines in half lengthwise and prick both the skin and cut sides many times with a knife. Then grill them on a slightly oiled baking sheet, turning them over half way through. The slashes let more of the juices out. The skin should be very black and you can scoop the flesh away from the skin with a teaspoon.


3

You should store your eggplant in a cool part of your fridge, in a plastic bag or (preferably) wrapped in plastic wrap. It should last for a good week like this. Alternately you can blanch and freeze it to store for 6-8 months however the texture will be different when you thaw it because the cell walls will have broken down some. If you go this route, I ...


3

As @jmoeller says, slice and salt the eggplant. Preferably wait for an hour, but even 15 minutes takes out some. I usually just use a papertowel to remove bitter fluids and most of the water. If you then desire them fried, but not too much oil. Frying in the oven requires much less oil.


2

I leave my eggplant whole but prick it all over. I then roast it for about 55 minutes on 170 degrees c. You should turn it over about half way through the cooking process. Once cooked, you can remove the skin. As the previous writers said, the skin should be very black and wrinkly. Another alternative is to cook the eggplant on a BBQ grill (reduce the ...


2

Several authorities claim that salting helps. Here's one method you can use to do that, Cut the aubergine into length-wise slices about half an inch thick; Place them on a kitchen-towel covered baking tray; Salt well using coarse grained salt (it will be easier to wipe off than table salt); Leave for 30 minutes; Wipe off excess salt (rinse off if you used ...


2

Yes, it is a way to remove the bitterness from eggplant, for larger more mature fruits with developed seeds. You may sprinkle the salt on both sides, let them sit for 15 - 20 minutes, and then rinse before baking. If you have younger or smaller eggplant, this is not necessary. I love to bake sliced eggplant, and serve it as a side dish, in a pasta dish, or ...


2

Did some looking around, which you have probably done also, and noted that there was no definitive answer. An unripe eggplant is going to be hard and have more solarine which apparently some people react to. However, since eggplant is a nightshade and some other nightshades ripen on the counter (think tomatoes) I would try leaving it out for a few days. ...


2

You have several options: Use the the broiler (or grill, as they say in the UK). Use a wok ring or similar to suspend the eggplant above your electric element. Set the element to its highest setting, cooking the eggplant by infrared. It just may take longer than the gas element would have. If you don't have a wok ring, you can use aluminum foil ...


1

I don't think this dish is ideal for freezing, but if you choose to do so, per Martha Stewart: To Freeze: Assemble dish but do not bake; wrap tightly with foil and freeze, up to 3 months. Thaw completely, then bake as directed.


1

Draining the water also helps getting rid of a somewhat bitter taste eggplants may have, especially if they are overripe. If you start with a fresh, young eggplant which is relatively light to its size (that's the best way to pick eggplants), then there's no need to bother with draining. The heavier eggplants may need draining, depending on their type and ...


1

In the UK they are all known as Aubergines and in the US as Eggplant as they are all fruiting bodies of the same family of plants, the nightshades. The ones that are in common use in Europe tend to be the larger purple and white varieties as these are the ones that have been cultivated in that continent. With the spread of the cuisines of different countries ...


1

To answer the last bit of your question; "Why do people do that?", I can only tell you why I do that. I peel, slice (either length wise, or on the bias), salt and press eggplant for an hour prior to cooking; I raise Japanese eggplant, which is slender and long, so I slice them lengthwise. I will slice the eggplant evenly, usually about 2 cm-3/4" thick, ...


1

OK, I am going to enter my thoughts here. The accepted answer is a pretty good one, and the article is a great way to help you prepare eggplant parm without it being to heavy with oil. But I don't think you can skip the salting. As in the article I have always baked/roasted my eggplant prior to assembling it. I did not use the paper towels as at that ...


1

Sounds like it could be the stripped down version of eggplant parm that, oddly enough, eschews the parm. I've had it a couple times in Southern Italy. Essentially, it's just layers of eggplant (with the moisture salted out in a colander, then the rounds dredged and fried), roma tomato passata, bocconcini (or any fresh mozzarella), basil leaves and sea salt. ...


1

Here's a possible alternative. Maybe not exactly what you're looking for, but I find one of the best ways to prepare eggplant is to slice into about 1cm or 1/2in thick slices, optionally do the salt-and-wait-to-get-the-liquid-out-then-pat-dry song and dance routine, then lightly oil them and cook on my searing hot cast iron stovetop griddle.



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