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9

I had the same problem before, but I learned this great trick from Larousse: Try sprinkling slices of your eggplant with plenty of salt on both sides and let rest for about fifteen minutes. The salt will draw out a lot of water from the vegetable, making it less spongy. Then, dry off the slices before adding them to very hot oil in a frying pan. The hot ...


4

I've had the best luck using the following method: Gently rub some salt on the eggplant and leave for a few minutes Dab the eggplant pieces with a paper towel to absorb the excess moisture. Microwave (I know, it sounds awful, but give it a shot) the eggplant for couple of minutes. This will partially cook the eggplant and also collapse the air pockets in ...


3

I find that a small amount of acid helps prevent the ugly browning and "sliminess" that may occur, however many foods like eggplant, okra, etc. that rely mostly on their moisture for structure, tend to be the poorest performers. I've had more luck cooking certain vegetables like this in advance then refrigerating, than I have trying to prep in advance.


3

Spray them lightly with olive oil on both sides, add your choice of fresh herbs¹, put them on an oven shelf and bake them in the oven at 150°C (300°F) until you get the texture you want. Don't go above that T° as the smoke point for olive oil is 160°C. Disadvantage: It's not really frying, it's baking Advantage: no extra sodium! :-) ¹: I like a mix of ...


1

i have grilled egg plant before with a little brush of oil and it came out fine. i think this could work with frying if you fried it on a gentle heat for a longer time so the water was released,and so it steams in its own juice. they are very juicy when they are cooked. i have also baked with minimal oil, just a drizzle and tossed, and into a medium oven. i ...


1

When you reheat something, the heat from the oven is usually just penetrating the outside layers of the food. Conduction within the food is what carries the heat into the center. To demonstrate this, you can try putting something cold (not frozen), and thick in the microwave on high for about 30-45 seconds. Take it out, then cut it in half. The outside ...


1

If the slices are thin, you could bake/roast straight from frozen. I do believe the texture will be quite soft so use a parchment lined sheet if you wish to roast it. I like to brush a bit of miso mixed with honey on roasted eggplants. Another option would be to lay it into a lasagna. I think this option is the most appealing. I wouldn't bother to thaw it ...



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