Hot answers tagged

70

Yes, it matters a lot. When you are separating egg whites, it is for whipping them into a foam. This foam is a protein-based foam, relying on protein ends hooking into each other. Even small traces of fat will prevent the foam from forming. Egg yolks contain high amounts of fat. Once an egg yolk breaks in your whites, you have to start the separation anew, ...


69

Well, it makes the eggs go further for one... But it also produces softer, creamier results. You're moving toward something like a custard or quiche. If you like your eggs very stiff, this is probably a bad idea.


56

Back in the 70's, the folks at Mother Earth News performed an egg storage experiment. They stored them in a variety of ways, both refrigerated and unrefrigerated, to see how long they could keep. They concluded that unwashed eggs (aka, "hen fruit" or "cackleberries") stored in a sealed container, and kept at 35° to 40°F, were still perfectly edible after ...


42

The Egg Nutrition Center's FAQ page has an entry on this very topic. Basically, the color of the egg does not affect the egg's flavor, nutritional value, etc. It simply depends on the particular breed of chicken that lays the egg -- white eggs from white hens, brown eggs from brown hens. It's also worth noting, as the ENC points out: Generally, brown ...


42

If you've never made scrambled eggs the Gordon Ramsey way you're really missing out. He calls for fresh cream, but I use sour cream and find it works just as well and gives a nice tangy flavor. Great video where he demonstrates the technique: http://videosift.com/video/Gordon-Ramsay-s-Perfect-Scrambled-Eggs According to him, one of the reasons to add milk ...


42

The traditional method is as Rumtscho describes. I got tired of this method for several reasons: Egg shells are dirty. Shells get in the egg (especially with home collected eggs which have MUCH thicker shells than store purchased eggs) Egg shells are sharp and it's hard to keep yolks whole. That method just takes too long if you need more than 2 eggs. ...


41

I have tried many techniques but what gets the best results for me is dropping them directly in water and vinegar. Complete method below: Take eggs out of fridge early and leave to reach room temp. It is okay to leave them out of fridge overnight if cooking for breakfast. Fill pan with water - I use frying pan with minimum depth of 4cm. Add splash of ...


40

Fried Eggs: Sunny Side Up -- Not flipped, unbroken yolk. The top of the egg is just barely set. Basted -- Sunny Side Up, hot fat spooned over until the white surrounding the yolk is opaque. Over Easy / lite -- Flipped, whites fully cooked, unbroken yolk, yolk runny. Over medium -- flipped, whites fully cooked, unbroken yolk, yolk creamy (not completely ...


38

This probably refers to whole eggs mostly... A microwave can boil water very rapidly, and a tight but fragile container like a whole egg will violently rupture if such rapid boiling happens inside it, because the overpressure inside it is already significant when the shell finally breaks. Here is a video showing an experiment with ca. 180 eggs in a ...


35

Well, frying means to cook in oil, so technically you can't. Fat also is delicious, so you'll lose something in the process besides just calories. If you are using teflon, ceramic, or some other non-stick, don't bring the heat up too much. Scrambling your eggs with milk will make them more fluffy, and I bet less likely to stick. Use (sigh) PAM or another ...


34

Yep. Rotten eggs float, fresh eggs sink. This is because eggshells are porous, so over time water vapour and gases leak out, reducing the egg's mass. A fresh egg will lie on its side on the bottom of a glass of water. The older the egg, the more it sits up, until it's floating.


29

Use part of the shell you just cracked to scoop it up; it will attract the broken bit. Also, if you frequently end up with bits of shell in your eggs, you should revise your cracking technique. Eggs should be cracked on a flat surface (countertop or plate) not a sharper surface like the edge of a bowl.


27

The exterior coating on an egg is known as the "cuticle". It helps to protect the (porous) shell and minimize moisture loss, but it eventually breaks down as the chick matures and prepares to hatch. The reason that eggs in the US are typically sold under refrigeration is because they are washed with warm water and detergent to remove the large amount of ...


26

I've never adjusted the length of time based on number of eggs. As long as the water is boiling I don't think it would take any longer to cook a dozen than to cook one (it might take the water longer to come up to boiling, I guess). For hard boiled I normally bring them up to the boil and then turn the heat off, and leave them for 15 minutes. If you like ...


26

It's worth learning to cook excellent scrambled eggs without the milk and cream, in my opinion. Traditionally, (well, at say Cordon Bleu in the 1950s), cream would be added to stop the eggs from overcooking once they were properly done. And, like people mentioned, they get creamier as well, but the cream would be cold and added at the end; its primary ...


26

Eggs are already 3/4 water anyway! By mixing in a small quantity of extra water before you cook the eggs, you are slowing down the cooking process by making more water available that has be evaporated. This keeps the cooking temperature to less than 100°C (212°F) for longer, therefore increasing the the time for the egg proteins to foam and expand before ...


25

Heston Blumenthal has brought his unique scientific approach to bear on this recently. The main pointers for a perfect poached egg are as follows: The egg must be fresh. A fresh egg has a thicker, more gel-like albumen. As it gets older, this becomes watery, and so just disperses throughout the water when you add it. To test if your egg is fresh, place it ...


24

If you want slops use the Ramsay method. If you want something with texture and taste try this Turn the heat onto max and use a light weight pan for gas, or a medium weight pan for electric. Add a small drizzle of oil to the pan In a strong deep bowl add a splash of milk or water and two eggs (say 20% liquid to 80% egg) Beat like crazy for 20 seconds ...


24

One factor you may not be considering is the quality of the egg itself. The highest-grade eggs have firm whites and more regular shapes when cracked onto a flat surface. The fresher the egg, generally, the higher the grade. If you've ever cracked a grocery store egg next to a fresh-laid egg, the difference is clear. The hen's diet makes a big difference, ...


23

Take an egg from the carton and 'spin' it on the work counter. If it spins, it's cooked, if it does anything else, it's not.


23

This depends on which type of omelet you want to make, I'll run through the three types I know how to make. The thick Waffle House style omelet (it's the kind that poofs up and is about an inch thick all the way around, IHOP also serves this omelet) is achieved by beating the eggs and incorporating a LOT of air in to the mixture. Restaurants do this by ...


22

According to Cook's Illustrated, the fat in milk or cream will actually separate the protein strands from the eggs, resulting in fluffier eggs. And fats give a smooth taste to food that you can feel on your tongue.


22

Crack the egg into a cup or bowl, whisk it, and measure out half of the contents. If you use eggs frequently, you could probably save the other half for a day or two - otherwise, it's like 8 cents out of your pocket. Not really sure what other solution you're expecting here...


22

Yes, you absolutely can eat turkey eggs. They are somewhat like duck eggs in that they are richer and creamier in taste. However, turkeys don't lay nearly as many eggs as chickens - perhaps 100 a year as opposed to a hen's 300, so don't expect to enjoy them too often.


21

I used the method here before with good success: http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_perfect_hard_boiled_eggs/ Basically you start with the eggs in the pan with cold water and bring the water to temperature, right when it reaches boiling you pull the heat back and let the eggs cook for 10 minutes. You don't need a full on boil to hard boil the ...


21

Before you submerge the egg, prick the large end of the shell with a (clean!) thumb tack or safety pin. This will allow the trapped air bubbles - which are normally responsible for cracking - to escape during the boiling process. Also take care to avoid any impacts: Don't overcrowd the pot - the eggs should form a single sparse layer; Use a tongs or ...


21

The yellow color comes (primarily) from vitamin A in the eggs. The eggs are high in vitamin A when the chickens are fed a natural diet of seeds, vegitation and insects. Most of the eggs that you buy in the states are factory farmed and pale because the chickens are fed a special protein mix that has a lot of corn. This makes them lay faster and more ...


21

There are two main base recipes for ice cream. French style ice cream contains egg yolks, which help make it soft, rich, smooth, creamy, custardy. Philadelphia style ice cream (sometimes called American style) has no eggs, and relies on the fat in the cream to keep it soft, but will still never be as rich and smooth as French style, and will still tend to ...


21

Moderate heat, eggs at room temperature, non-stick egg pan (8" is good, with gently sloping sides) with a tight lid. Melt butter in the egg pan until it stops foaming. Crack your eggs into a bowl so you've got more control when you add them to the egg pan. Cook uncovered until just the bottoms of the white are set, the tops of the whites should still be ...


20

There is a whole science on that. Simply saying: source: blog.khymos.org Where: t - time T - temperature M - mass in grams While this is for soft-boiling eggs, I believe you can easily adjust it for hard-boiling. Even an application, that cosiders all the variables, exists: Kunsten å koke et egg - Google translated While for me this is far more ...



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