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(1) Taste. When you salt your eggs DOES affect taste because it affects the way your tongue comes into contact with the salt. If you salt your eggs before or during cooking, some of all of the salt dissolves in the water that is in the eggs (raw eggs, overall, are roughly 75% water) and is dispersed over the surface of your eggs while they cook. When you ...


3

If the shell is undamaged, and the eggs are not past their expiration/best by date, they are safe to eat. Official source: your government's food safety agency, unless you live in a place with really really lax food regulation. But your profile says Australia - I'm sure things are fine there. If there are problems with salmonella outbreaks, it's not anything ...


2

The lower bound seems to be at 2 to 4 days in the fridge. The upper bound is probably at 7 to 10 days in the fridge at less than 4°C (32 F) 1 1 Source: Swiss journal about poultry farming. This information refers to the storage of whole eggs. Two sentences before, the text says that cracked eggs stored at 4°C must be cooked within 48 hours to be conformable ...


2

i know this is an old post, but i believe i've cracked this code, if you put an inch and a half or so of water in the pan and let it sit on medium heat for four or five minutes, rinsing the pan removes most of the egg, swiping with your finger, has the rest come off instantly


1

Since salt does draw out moisture, it can lend itself to a tough and chewy egg. That quality is much more pronounced when it's a hard-cooked egg, but as a general rule I salt when serving. Also, if you pre-salt, the salt dissolves a bit into the liquid and gets dispersed. So I find I need far less salt dressing the egg at the end since there is a lack of ...


1

I'm not sure how you would salt a sunny side up egg before cooking unless you poked a hole in the shell, but as for during and after I've tried it both ways and I've never noticed much of a difference. All I would say is that when I add it during the salt taste seems to be more distributed throughout the egg than if it is added after. Scientifically there ...


1

Your risk is likely lower than that of Americans, as your user info lists you being in the Netherlands. European chickens are often innoculated against salmonella, which brings down the risk significantly. I would ask your mother-in-law to be certain if this is the case, especially if she's in another country (eg, if you're near the Netherlands / Belgium ...



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