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1

The short answer is yes (although it would be less than 4 whole eggs as answered by @JasonTrue ) The change would be to the texture and flavour of the finished cake, and possibly the rise. Using yolks only will give a much denser, creamer, richer tasting cake. If you replace with whole eggs, you just get a regular cake. Personally, i'd keep the recipe as ...


2

In principal, you'd probably be able to find a recipe that uses ~2 eggs with a similar net volume, but it may not be so easy to retrofit your existing recipe, as it's reasonable to expect that the recipe is relying on some property of the yolk (emulsifying power, fat content, etc). You may find the result satisfying, but it is likely that you will produce a ...


0

2 tablespoons of APPLESAUCE! An old family trick my grandmother used to use, works magic you cant taste the difference!


0

I just found green mold in the shell of the egg shell and a large black dot on the yolk; the date says good until Sept 1. I throughout the rest of the eggs, kept the one in question and contacted the egg farm to report it. Not worth getting sick over a dollar or two, or worse dying. I'd definitely go with the when in doubt throw it out. Fs


1

Temperature is only half the equation. Different kinds of metal will transfer heat at different rates. For example, a copper skillet will transfer heat differently than a cast iron skillet. When water is drizzled on a skillet it should dance and spatter, but should not steam. If it bubbles, it is too cool. If it steams, it is too hot. The key to making ...


1

There are two main types of scrambled egg: The omelet style and the cream/custard/hospital style For the first see Better Scrambled Eggs , you can cook it at a bit below maximum stove heat, but that's not as flavoursome or fun in my book For the cream/custard style, it's a medium stove top heat (no exact figure), but check with Mr Ramsay?


3

First off, measuring the temperature of an empty pan will only tell you so much. That temperature is a result of the balance of your stove putting heat into the pan and the pan transferring that heat to the surrounding air, which means it depends on the pan, and as soon as you put anything in the pan the temperature is going to change. (See also What ...


0

Egg smell is more evident in pound cakes where the ratio of eggs used is higher. In layered cakes it is less as fats and eggs are in nearly equal proportion. Besides a combination of two essences where vanilla is common and any other like mixed fruit, almond or other as per requirement can be used. Sugar quantity is increased and milk powder is added, thus ...


4

There is some slight confusion but there are two methods for this. You either cook the egg separately, which is how they make BiBimBop or you poach or bake the eggs if you cook the egg on top of your food. With the latter method, the eggs generally cook very quickly so it doesn't take a lot of time but you are still cooking the egg using a heat source, you ...


0

The temperature of the food is mainly irrelevant, as you are not cooking the egg. It is not making the egg any safer to eat. You run the same risk whether you crack a raw egg into a glass and drink it, or top your steak with it. If you like raw egg, find a source you trust and go for it. If you are looking for a pasteurized or cooked egg, there are a ...


0

Peeling them IS THE TIME SAVER .. So keeping them in water is the best way and having to dry them ( with a paper towel or how ever) is what I have to do is not that te consuming .. It is peeling them ... I do this weekly .... Hard boil them keep them in water and every morning grab 2 rinse for 3 seconds then dry them off for 3 seconds .. Sprinkle salt and ...


0

This is one of the reasons I used to hate cleaning up after breakfast. However, I've noticed that rinsing the pan first and scraping off the larger particles with a spatula and then letting it soak in dishwasher (machine) soap for a while seems to work better than normal sink dish soap. Then a little scrubbing, rinsing and then repeat with normal dish soap ...


-2

No egg is safer when it’s raw. It will give you SALMONELLA POISONING AND THE INFECTION which is in the ENTEROBACTERIACEAE family and in the GAMMAPROTEOBACTERIA class Your friend may have gotten it but he just did not know because it does not affect you right away after you consume it. Please be safe: he runs the risk of contracting it while drinking it raw. ...


0

I see two possible solutions here: Very slowly increase the temperature of the water. This way, the water currents will be much tamer, and the egg is much less likely to move around. You could also try either cooking the egg in a heat-resistant spoon to minimize its movement, or fill the pot with many eggs, so they have less room to move around and gently ...


0

I crack two eggs into the med-heat skillet, and as soon as the eggs are able to be moved around in the pan, I gently pour them into another skillet already heated turning them over in the process being careful not to rupture the yolks. Add salt and pepper and cook about one to two more minutes and then pour onto a plate. The whites are just barely set and ...


0

I like Fuzzychefs idea for bring the strata up to temp. The recipes I have do say to let the strata sit for 30 minutes or more, but I always understood that to mean if you are not making it ahead of time to give the eggs and other liquids enough time to soak into the bread.


3

This is why I usually crack eggs into 2 bowls so one bad one won't contaminate whatever I'm making. I didn't do that tonight and had to throw out a batch of cornbread. I always go by the rule "When in doubt, throw it out!" There was no obvious crack in the egg. When I opened it I noticed a brown discoloration in the yolk. Then I looked in the shell and saw ...


1

I steam mine all the time because it makes them much easier to peel. I own a restaurant and I'm all about easy and fast. I agree that 10 minutes is plenty of time for them to be done.



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