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1

I start with the coarser "nylon wool"-type scrub pad, then switch to the scotchbrite-type. The egg residue can be more easily rinsed from the coarser pad.


1

One of the reasons is what cantido probably meant: you can overheat the eggs quickly if you pour them into the hot milk. Heat transfer is proportional to the distance from the boundary between the two materials. If you pour a thin stream of hot milk into tepid eggs, most of the eggs don't get heated, because they are far away from the boundary. They only ...


0

The egg proteins still coagulate and cook. The difference in tempering is that since the heat is rising very slowly, and you are presumably stirring, the proteins do not clump up into scrambled eggs.


4

Put some water in the pot Add vinegar or citric acid (whatever you can get your hands on more easily). (Sorry, I have no measurements, I always eyeball it. I guess up to 5% for vinegar is fine, or one or two teaspoons of citric acid depending on the pot-size...) Heat to a rolling boil... (do NOT put your head over the pot to see it it works, especially ...


0

Found part of the answer here is a link www.exploratorium.edu this website explains how the amino acids in the proteins change in different applications that are applied to eggs. It does not provide the chemical composition changes you might see in a lab although. I hope this is helpful. Revised Answer Egg Science: Egg proteins change when you heat ...


-1

The information below came from eggfarmers.org.nz WARNING, This link is a PDF file. (nz stands for New Zealand, but there is some good insight available on this .pdf). Yolk quality: Yolk quality is determined by the colour, texture, firmness and smell of the yolk (Jacob et al., 2000). Yolk colour: Although yolk colour is a key factor in ...


6

Surprisingly high -- something like 6 gallons of oil can be emulsified by a single egg yolk. In addition to the site linked, I've seen similar experiments by Kenji Lopez-Alt and James Petersen. So if your mayonnaise refuses to emulsify, it's NOT because it doesn't have enough egg yolks.


3

I just stumbled upon this to see if I ruined my angel food cake when some egg yolk leaked into my whites. I spooned out as much as I could but there was still a little in the whites but I didn't have enough eggs to start over. Gave it a go, and I was able to get stiff peaks. Took a tad longer than normal but I got stiff peaks nonetheless.


1

I know this is not a SCIENTIFIC test with control groups and such, but I will share my thoughts on this matter and how I've been pickling my fresh egg surplus for over 25 years with absolutely no ill effects, or refrigeration. I may add that my 4 children were raised eating these eggs, even in the hot Southern summers, and they are all very much alive with ...


0

I steam mine in my rice cooker, start it up to make sure it's warm then I set it to steam for 12 minutes. It's nice because the steam basket fits nicely into the ice bath after and it's all easy clean up. Mine turn out perfectly every time, no green and no raw parts :)


0

I've added just the yolks, unbroken, to the final boiling process, then cook through. The flavor it adds is just a back note...but once you've tried it, you'll never want chicken soup any other way. It's similar to the Polish version, just without the egg-whites.


-4

yeah right ! Hair has immense protein... why dont we put it in our broth and simmer for hours.. or even better start eating it raw ?? There are some stuff that is inedible and no matter how much mineral content they have, they will never be edible.. eating hair will kill you as it will just accumulate in your stomach and the body does not know how to get ...


-1

I am 54 now I have been eating pickled eggs since I could walk and talk. My grandmother had a shelf in the corner of the kitchen where there was always pickled food,the eggs were the best and they were never kept cold no one got sick or died in her house.


0

I "fry" my eggs on a "dry grill" meaning in my ceramic pan with no oils or butter. On low heat and a lid, they come out just as tasty as the regular way.


1

I've been using the Nordic Ware Microwave Egg Boiler for a few years. Depending on the size of the eggs, you'll need between 6.5 and 8 minutes at 1100 watts. Once you've settled on a brand and size of eggs, you can get them perfect every time - hard boiled, soft yolk etc. by tweaking the cooking time between those two values. Fantastic gadget, 4.5+ stars on ...



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