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I have been scrambling three large eggs at a time. I eat one and put the rest in the fridge in a sealed plastic container. I make egg salad out of the leftovers for sandwiches over the next two days adding various things like onion bits, dill, mustard, hot sauce, lemon pepper, cheese slices, etc. The eggs taste just fine. The sealed container keeps them ...


3

I will just add just a few observations beyond Preston Fitzgerald's excellent answer. If I understand the question, it seems to imply a preference for dry, firmly-cooked ("tough"), and somewhat browned scrambled eggs, which is what some people would refer to as "well-done" (and others might consider "overcooked"). The person asking the question also ...


8

Temperature is the only full proof way to determine doneness. Unfortunately it's not very practical to carry a thermometer over to your friend's house for brunch. There are other indicators, of course, and you have mentioned the good ones for eggs. I will add, however, that some indicators can be deceiving. For example, eggs releasing a pool of liquid is ...


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I just read that the liquid from canned chickpeas can be used as an egg substitute in recipes. You can even whip it for meringue.


-1

A lot of commercial mayonnaises/aiolis use whole eggs, which doesn't darken the mixture as much as egg yolks alone. The restaurants you speak of could be doing the same. Also, what kind of oil are you using? When I use sunflower oil in aioli, it's lighter than something like olive oil. Alternatively, ChefSteps etc. use titanium dioxide to make things ...


0

I would suggest using the eggs with something that would be more potent of a taste than the fish flavor in the eggs. Maybe use salsa and cheese. You might even scramble the eggs and use that in a different dish. The eggs, along with many other foods with allow for chemicals to transfer through to them. Smell is simply little bits of matter floating around ...


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I'm not sure what the cause is but I know not everyone can smell or taste this. I cracked an egg once and the smell was instant and pretty strong, I had a friend smell it and he couldn't smell anything. I've experienced this with both regular and organic eggs but it seems to happen a lot less often with organic eggs. Also, I don't know if these things are ...


1

Duck eggs have a heavier, more waxy coating on them than chicken eggs do. Duck eggs must be more resistant to bacteria in moist environments since they are much more likely to be exposed to it than a chicken egg is since, in nature, the duck spends much more time in the water. A heavier, more waxy coating means less evaporation and less chance for bacteria ...


2

Let's look at the estimated calories in that recipe: Eggs: 270 Milk: 12 Cornstarch: 15 Butter: 306 So, given that the single largest source of calories in that recipe is the butter -- more than the eggs! -- if you're looking to reduce calorie count cutting back on the butter to 1 Tbs is the way to go. Of course, that will affect the flavor as well. ...


0

Use a small pot with hot water from a kettle or water boiler, add small amount of vinegar (helps to keep the egg together) then wait until you see small bubbles. No need to swirl the water, just add the egg and don't let the water boil vigorously. Wait until cooked to your preference.


2

Two massive pans (15 eggs in one pan at a time) on a low heat with lots of oil, yes its sounds oily and unhealthy but it makes mass egg cooking possible. Slow cook the eggs to perfection, just make sure to drain off the oil for perfectly cooked sunny side up eggs. I do this every morning and go through about 200+ eggs a day in a buffet style, and people ...



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