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Yes, they will taste different. Egg shells are porous in order to provide oxygen to the developing chick. While the egg is still uncooked, it will take on the tastes of outside ingredients fairly easily. As it cooks, the albumin coagulates and forms chains that prevent moisture and vapor exchange, so it becomes resistant to absorbing outside ingredients. As ...


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Let the remaining sit in the skillet to dry and the eggs will lift slightly off the pan, especially the sides. Then take a paper towel, cloth or non-scratch spatula and remove. Try it. You will be amazed. (No water needed until time to wash)


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I'll agree with the input provided by the other two responders - but have some additional data to add. First off - Cast iron pans are just fine for cooking eggs. While a teflon pan will be a bit easier - a well seasoned cast iron pan is "almost" like a teflon. Concerning your black bits: your pan is probably just "dirty" and as the previous person ...


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The shells might let the flavor through. Even if they did, at that point, it's too late. Due to temperature exposure, the egg white has changed state from liquidy to rubbery. Once that egg white has changed to set form, a regular egg boiling session isn't going to change the flavor of a set egg white. The flavors can't penetrate into the set proteins. Long ...


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I don't think that boiling an egg in something is enough to flavor the egg. The shell is porous, but not enough that a lot passes through without more time. I have seen recipes that involve boiling, cooling, and warming again in a flavorful liquid. I think the multiple temperature changes would be needed to really add noticeable flavor.


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Eggs keep fine for two weeks just fine raw in the shell and about abit over a week cooked into a fritta shape, 25 sec in a microwave works wonders


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Baked, covered, at low heat : ovens self-regulate, so you're going to get a more consistent result each time than doing it on the stovetop. covering will minimize evaporation, which will cool the top more. low heat will minimize problems with the edges cooking before the middle ... but eggs also have this strange thing where it's more difficult to over ...


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This is going to sound rather unorthodox, but whipping chilled instant chocolate pudding will make a nice mousse substitute. I can't call it mousse really, but you honestly can't tell the difference unless you are taste testing side by side with one made from fresh shaved chocolate. Obviously the real mousse will be much richer when tasted side by side, but ...


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Silken tofu mousse recipes couldn't be easier. Yes, can get it quite light. Maybe not as aerated as with egg or gelatin but without the off flavors of either


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I don't think there's anything wrong with your pasta dough. It's on the dry side of the spectrum, which makes it go through the roller easily without sticking, but it won't work well in an extruder. The edge cracking is normal, and you can always cut it off if desired. You can reduce cracking by working it to the full width of the machine at the ...


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Step 1: Hit farm markets and organic co-ops to locate local producers. If the ones who are there can't supply you, they usually know a producer who can. If they don't have omega-3- eggs, they may know who does/ Step 2: Do your research. Ask prospective suppliers about their feeds (lots of greens, alfalfa and fish by-products are desirable, as opposed to ...



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