Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If you have the carton take them back to the store when you bought them from and exchange them for a new carton or get your money back. My grandfather had a chicken ranch and if there was a problem he had no problem returning money or exchanging with eggs or both so, when in doubt, return. Most supermarkets are great at returning groceries and especially ...


3

The reason the egg yolks break up easily on contact with a pan or taking them out of the egg is because the hen has a lack of protein in her diet. That's it in an "eggshell". It could be low quality feed, molting or stress. I raise chickens and fresh eggs. As stated above, your eggs should not be kept in the refrigerator. Keep them on the counter pointy ...


1

I don't recall seeing them unrefrigerated as far back as the 1970's, so either your big cities were slower to take up the practice than the smaller towns and cities I've frequented stores in, or your memory is fudging some numbers. The mystical magical "bloom" only works if the egg is free of fecal matter. Given a choice of bloom and fecal matter or washed ...


0

I have found this method to achieve a decent meringue with less sugar: Set a pan of water to simmer. Using a metal bowl or the top of the double boiler, place your egg whites over the simmering water.Add about half the usual amount of granulated or superfine sugar and stir until the sugar is dissolved. I don't use a thermometer. Take the egg white ...


8

Apple cider vinegar still contains the acidity that the dye needs to activate, so it should work just fine. You may encounter a slight discoloration due to the naturally brown tint of apple cider vinegar.


0

Yes. They may taste watery but they won't hurt.


1

Sous vide would be difficult to move, as you'd need to deal with how to power it while in transit ... you either need a power inverter that can run off your car's alternator, or lug around a UPS (battery backup system). If I were to try something like this, I'd poach the eggs (with vinegar in the water) 'til they were set and I felt that I could safely move ...


3

Some data: Egg whites start coagulating at 150F. Egg yolks start thickening at 150F and become solid at 158F or so. The danger zone for bacteria is between 40F and 130F. What this means is that your perfect poaching temperature is going to be somewhere around 150F to 155F depending on how firm you like your eggs. At these temperatures bacteria can't grow ...


1

I found that by adding some vanilla extract at the end that it added flavor to compensate for less sugar.


1

I start with the coarser "nylon wool"-type scrub pad, then switch to the scotchbrite-type. The egg residue can be more easily rinsed from the coarser pad.


1

One of the reasons is what cantido probably meant: you can overheat the eggs quickly if you pour them into the hot milk. Heat transfer is proportional to the distance from the boundary between the two materials. If you pour a thin stream of hot milk into tepid eggs, most of the eggs don't get heated, because they are far away from the boundary. They only ...


0

The egg proteins still coagulate and cook. The difference in tempering is that since the heat is rising very slowly, and you are presumably stirring, the proteins do not clump up into scrambled eggs.


5

Put some water in the pot Add vinegar or citric acid (whatever you can get your hands on more easily). (Sorry, I have no measurements, I always eyeball it. I guess up to 5% for vinegar is fine, or one or two teaspoons of citric acid depending on the pot-size...) Heat to a rolling boil... (do NOT put your head over the pot to see it it works, especially ...


0

Found part of the answer here is a link www.exploratorium.edu this website explains how the amino acids in the proteins change in different applications that are applied to eggs. It does not provide the chemical composition changes you might see in a lab although. I hope this is helpful. Revised Answer Egg Science: Egg proteins change when you heat ...


-1

The information below came from eggfarmers.org.nz WARNING, This link is a PDF file. (nz stands for New Zealand, but there is some good insight available on this .pdf). Yolk quality: Yolk quality is determined by the colour, texture, firmness and smell of the yolk (Jacob et al., 2000). Yolk colour: Although yolk colour is a key factor in ...


7

Surprisingly high -- something like 6 gallons of oil can be emulsified by a single egg yolk. In addition to the site linked, I've seen similar experiments by Kenji Lopez-Alt and James Petersen. So if your mayonnaise refuses to emulsify, it's NOT because it doesn't have enough egg yolks.


3

I just stumbled upon this to see if I ruined my angel food cake when some egg yolk leaked into my whites. I spooned out as much as I could but there was still a little in the whites but I didn't have enough eggs to start over. Gave it a go, and I was able to get stiff peaks. Took a tad longer than normal but I got stiff peaks nonetheless.


1

I know this is not a SCIENTIFIC test with control groups and such, but I will share my thoughts on this matter and how I've been pickling my fresh egg surplus for over 25 years with absolutely no ill effects, or refrigeration. I may add that my 4 children were raised eating these eggs, even in the hot Southern summers, and they are all very much alive with ...



Top 50 recent answers are included