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1

I've been using the Nordic Ware Microwave Egg Boiler for a few years. Depending on the size of the eggs, you'll need between 6.5 and 8 minutes at 1100 watts. Once you've settled on a brand and size of eggs, you can get them perfect every time - hard boiled, soft yolk etc. by tweaking the cooking time between those two values. Fantastic gadget, 4.5+ stars on ...


0

While the other answer is correct, I have had good experience with cleaning my pans by heating them up a bit on the stove and carefully wiping it down with a damp rag. It doesn't remove too much seasoning and keeps the food a bit cleaner. The pan will be reseasoned every time you cook with oil so as long as you use the pan once every couple days it will be ...


1

You hit the nail on the head. The seasoning is coming off. It's just chunks of fat/oil with bits of black rust, or black oxide. The solution is to either stop using the pan to cook scrambled eggs, or strip the pan down to the cast iron and re-season it. Seasoning is a two part process. The first part is developing the layer of black rust, and the ...


0

Pre warm chilled eggs in a bowl of hot tap water for 5 mins and put them straight into boiling water. Never crack!


1

Well, the sugar and lemon can act as stabilizers to the egg whites. It would help stiffen up the cream and allow it to be more spreadable. So to answer your question, the egg white is actually what's making the creamy texture, with the help of some other things. You could also substitute cream of tartar which is the acidic bi-product from wine making instead ...


1

There is a non-zero risk of getting a salmonella infection from raw eggs. However- with only 2 eggs that risk is very low. If you are only serving the dish to healthy adults then the repercussions of the potential infection are also minor. You should understand the risks and then decide whether you are ok with them or not. If you are not you can always ...


3

I work at a restaurant and we keep peeled eggs (for salads) in a covered container and cover them with fresh water. Ours don't usually last longer than 2 days or so (before we run out and have to make more), but we are able to keep them for up to a week, and they taste just as fresh on day 7 as on day 1, so long as you remember to change the water out daily. ...


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I sometimes add an extra egg to my Challah dough (based on 3.5C flour for 2 loaves) when I want some etra richness, with no ill effect. I can't see why an additional egg in this formula would cause a problem.


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I achieve good results just using a small spatula and "spreading" the whites. With a bit of practice no one will see the difference :3


-1

OP- I've had a similar experience, causing me to search out an answer. My eggs always stick with coconut oil and rarely do with butter. I am quite certain I follow the same process in terms of heating the pan and allowing the fat to get hot. Here's my only (totally unsupported) speculation, based mostly on what I SEE happening in the pan: I think oils are ...


0

Ummm. Old eggs? No spatula? Pouring butter or oil on top? I suspect this isn't true. How do short order cooks, with spatulas (like at Denny's or Perkins or Bob Evans) do it? I believe the real answer is "practice". I'm sorry if that is inconvenient for some people.



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