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1

Ok, I am very interested in trying the baking soda method and I will this weekend. I do the same thing as David to save time during my busy week by cooking them up on the weekend and peeling them ready to eat. As for storage I let them cool down fully, dry them and place them in a container and put them in the fridge. The next day I drain out any liquid ...


2

Commercial eggnog virtually ALWAYS has nutmeg in it, so you are just adding to that. While it's easy to grab the stuff, it's worth making your own eggnog if you'd like to raise your 'nog experience several notches. I can't imagine grinding nutmeg at home - that would take a heck of a grinder, and it would be hard to do less than a whole nutmeg at a time, ...


3

Add it if you like! As mentioned in the comments, eggnog usually already has nutmeg in it, so when you say you say you can't taste anything other than nog, in reality you're probably tasting eggnog including nutmeg! If what you add is pre-ground, the flavor probably isn't terribly strong. And even with freshly grated nutmeg, you're probably only adding a ...


4

What you're describing sounds normal to me. It's the result of overcooking them. The eggs themselves were fine. At a guess, you unknowingly messed up the timing for the particular batch described here (alternatively, the eggs may have been smaller than usual). Over cooking hard boiled eggs will result in the smell you identified (and also cause the ...


5

Butter and egg yolks have very different profiles in terms of their uses in recipes and constituent parts. Butter usually has 80-85% fat by weight, while egg yolks are only about 25-30% fat. Butter has only a trace amount of milk proteins, while egg yolks typically have 15% or more protein by weight. Butter has only a small amount (about 15%) of water, ...


-4

Using water does make the taste a lot better because the protein is a lot richer.


-3

If you beat egg whites separately and egg yellow and sugar separately and followed by flour, I Am sure you will not get an egg smell in your cake. After beating both you have to combine both and fold. I find this is the best way.


0

I've just made great pancakes using ground flax seed instead of eggs. I just put 1 spoonful in the batter, let it rest a couple of minutes, and it was ready to fry. Great substitute


1

I once read in an old cookbook (I think the Betty Crocker one from the 1950's) to wash dishes used to cook eggs with cold water, not warm water, because the cold water keeps the egg from baking on to the pan even more than it already has. I tried it, and this definitely works! After removing all the egg residue, you can then wash it with warm water. The ...


-1

I came here because I don't actually like the white cake. The texture is a bit different. After reading these great suggestions I found instructions on the box in small print. Betty Crocker mix says: add the whole egg and don't change anything else. I think I will do that. Thanks for all the suggestions..


1

I have some suggestions for alternative emulsifiers, and a concern to express using eggs given the intended purpose of your syrup. Alternative Emulsifiers As to how "every-day" these are, it will depend on where you are in the UK. I can find these easily in the states at places like Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, etc in the bulk spice/flour aisle. Lecithin ...


2

I think you will have much better luck if you just wait to get an appropriate almond extract. Aside from the difficulty of mixing an oil based flavoring, you'll run into texture issues if you do get it mixed. Generally an emulsion will be thicker than the component liquids. Further, the flavor probably won't be what you want. If you're creating a water or ...


0

If you watch the Travel Channel episode on The God of Ramen -- renown ramen soup shop in Japan -- you will see that the chef there uses the egg shells to clarify the broth. That is all that is said about it. You will see the egg shells floating atop the soup, which also has lots of ground pork and other ingredients simmering along with them. When they ...


1

If you heated the eggs above 160°F/70°C (and boiling is definitely above that), they're cooked, and any harmful bacteria has been killed. Can't say for sure that you did this without knowing the steps you performed. Given, if it doesn't taste good, and it was cheap ingredients... sounds like an argument to discard it anyway. Even if its perfectly safe. ...


0

Sugar is crucial to making meringues!! It is what helps the chemical reaction with the egg whites and helps create that beautiful fluffy texture. However, I've come to own a fabulous book called "meringue magic" by Alisa Morov(who invented savoury meringues I believe). Amongst amazing savoury recipes she says you can reduce sugar to a certain amount but can ...



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