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Your risk is likely lower than that of Americans, as your user info lists you being in the Netherlands. European chickens are often innoculated against salmonella, which brings down the risk significantly. I would ask your mother-in-law to be certain if this is the case, especially if she's in another country (eg, if you're near the Netherlands / Belgium ...


3

Using a food-processor to beat scrambled eggs is going to over-beat them. Over-beaten eggs will turn rubbery. The American Egg Board describes well-beaten eggs as "frothy and evenly colored." This generally takes about 20 to 35 seconds of beating - do not over beat. You want to get them to a uniform color and texture with minimal amounts egg white ...


0

I have a new way - plop the whole egg or eggs in a pan like normal people, wait a bit then use a blowtorch to set that last bit of white which is around the yolk. The blowtorch approach works great for omelettes too - so I can set the top and flip (if the mood takes me).


3

Americas test kitchen has tested this in a prior issue. I cannot put my hands on the issue right now which explained their process and the results. It also contained a good deal of explanation about the science of the process. They tried all sorts of liquids in their omelette and scrambled eggs recipe. They found that water did make the eggs slightly ...


4

No, your reasoning is incorrect. Food safety rules are dumbed down because they have to be taken literally without any reasoning. if the temperature is very high all the time during that time, I think the maximum time is shorter. The maximum holding time isn't shorter for higher temperatures. It is the time at which food is legally safe, and it is ...


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The key thing here is a substance called Lecithin and it is found in your Incredible, Edible Egg! Doing the adding of the egg one-by-one, plus a few other things are... in the service of creating a stable emulsion of liquid and fat in the batter. When this is done correctly, the cake will have a springy, even crumb, great flavor, and light texture. If ...


3

Use clarified butter, pre-heat the pan on medium heat Drain the watery part of the white away from the egg (also a technique to use you want good lookin' poached eggs) cook until desired doneness. Lower the heat to avoid bubbling and browning (which I didn't do). Note: regarding the OP's "good looking egg" reference picture ... The only time I've ever ...


2

I've found that warming the eggs before I cook them by placing them in warm water helps them cook in the pan much faster with less temperature fluctuation, and I'm finding that the yolk has less of a tendency to roll off to the side. Also, I'm using a cast-iron skillet, which also reduces temperature fluctuation since it both retains and conducts heat well. ...


1

I make myself a breakfast of bacon and eggs every Saturday morning. I feel I have perfected my egg cooking, and I will attempt to tell you how to replicate it. Preparation Materials: One Cast Iron Skillet, 12 inches diameter A wooden spatula with a rounded corner on one side A wide pancake flipper One Gas Stove (electric is less ideal but do-able) A ...


7

I was in the same place you are several years ago. I'd crack the egg into the pan and it'd end up all splotchy and non-circular. I even tried cracking the egg into a separate bowl first as I'd seen a diner cook do, and then pouring the bowl into the pan to try to get a more circular result but to no avail. The thing that I finally realized is that during ...


2

As an addition to the other tricks: Eggs are a bit like human mammaries: Younger ones are firmer and rounder than older ones. So using fresher eggs will help. You should also ensure that you don't use too high a heat (medium heat is plenty).


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Use heaps of oil. Cook on a medium low heat, spooning hot oil every so often to coat the top of the whites. Place a plate over then pan for the last couple of minutes to finish off the tops of the whites. I've only tried this using fresh eggs from happy chickens so that may be the real trick.


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To get the perfectly round shape yet not fast food style "square" edges don't use a frying pan. Or at least don't use a large flat-bottom frying pan. Use a wok or a small, purpose built, egg frying pan. The round bottom of the wok means that your egg will be forced into a round shape and not wander around. The down side of using a wok is that you'll end up ...


24

One factor you may not be considering is the quality of the egg itself. The highest-grade eggs have firm whites and more regular shapes when cracked onto a flat surface. The fresher the egg, generally, the higher the grade. If you've ever cracked a grocery store egg next to a fresh-laid egg, the difference is clear. The hen's diet makes a big difference, ...


1

See this answer: What's the best approach to get runny-yolk sunny side up fried eggs?. You can certainly use a ring mold as in Laura's answer, but that's not something you're likely to see in a diner or cafe. A little irregularity in the shape of fried eggs is usually expected, but it is nice to take care to center the yolks. If you'd like to use a ring ...


11

As with many kitchen techniques, there's a gadget that can help! In this case, little metal rings that hold your egg in place while it's frying so the end result is nice and round. Here's an example of a set that Williams Sonoma sells: If you don't want yet another gadget, you can get better with practice. Use a small frying pan so there's less room for ...


0

Was the limestone and hay wrapper cracked or the egg shells? Century eggs are really only a few weeks-months old, actually. Though they do keep for long periods at room temperature. They're also damn tasty and have a lot of ammonia i.e. Very high PH (basic) so unlikely to spoil.


1

Working in a professional kitchen where we cooked eggs in various styles. I would say from my experience: Hard boiled eggs will keep for 4 days refrigerated in the shell, before they become unpalatable. Soft boiled eggs(hard whites, creamy yolks) will keep in the shell, refrigerated for 2 days. Poached eggs, properly cooled in ice water and drained, ...


1

Personally, I always use whole eggs combined with a small amount of water and salt. You should tailor your wash to what you are doing though. Generally dairy will dull your shine (and the richer the dairy, the darker the color), whole eggs give a golden color, whites give a clear shine, and yolks will give a deep reddish brown. A bit of salt will help to ...


1

I have always used egg and milk. Two thirds egg to one third milk. Use a spray bottle to ensure that you get a nice, even coverage. Also make sure that you have a full proof on your goods, because (obviously) anything that gets exposed to the heat due to oven spring will not have color. Just the way I have always done things (and I used to work in some ...


3

When this happens to me, I am distrustful of a simple reheat. It is possible that it was undercooked, but also possible that it was maybe overcooked/understirred and that most of the binding proteins solidified on the bottom and too little of them remained in the milk, or maybe that the ratios were simply wrong. Your specific recipe also contains starch, ...



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