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23

A regular electric oven uses a large coiled resistor as a heating element. A large electric current is passed through this element which generates heat, similar to the tungsten filament of an incandescent light bulb. An induction stove doesn't actually generate heat itself, but rather induces it the pot or pan. It does this using a rapidly oscillating ...


16

The burners on essentially all electric stoves are binary in that they are either fully on, or fully off. It would be more expensive and less energy efficient to use electronics that continuously vary the current flow through an electric element, and this would make no significant difference in temperature behavior at the cooking surface. Instead, electric ...


9

The reason that cookware warps is that it is has too thin of a base. When it has been heated to a high temperature, it warps upon cooldown. The only way to avoid this is to buy very sturdy, heavy duty cookware. You need to look for something with a very thick and heavy base, then you will have no issue. And don't think that it will put you in the ...


8

Can I convince you that electric is better? No, I can't, because I don't think it is. The issue I have is related to how long it takes to warm up (and cool down). Electric cook tops just don't respond quickly. Little too hot? Too bad, nothing you can do about it (in time to save a dish that's starting to burn anyway). Not hot enough? Check back in 2 or 3 ...


7

Electric stove elements have a different KW rating depending on construction and size A typical spiral element of 200 mm (8") diameter will be 2 KW, a 150 mm (6") diameter element will be 1.3 KW Different stove makes and models have different ratings. But not many go above 2 KW Stove makers usually publish exact specifications on their web sites 1 W is ...


7

Summary or "detailed" instructions: flip frequently, and if it's still cooking too fast on the outside and too slow on the inside, adjust the temperature down a little. Maybe you'll take two or three tries to get it perfect, but such is life. Medium-high probably means somewhere between halfway and maximum on your stove. There's no temperature, don't worry ...


7

I don't think that you'll get the results that you expect. My experience includes an MSR Whisperlite International backpacking stove (white gas), and Coleman two-burner stoves in both white gas and propane variants. Anecdotally, the backpacking stove has limited control, while the two-burner stoves don't quite have the oomph of a real gas stove. The ...


6

While a cook will tell you that good pans are always better, I think that they will not solve your problem. If anything, better pans conduct heat better, so if you keep cooking at the same temperatures as now, you'll burn more food. A good temperature control with bad pans is useful, good pans with bad temperature control don't bring much. The correct ...


6

Silly, silly me. As Jefromi suggested earlier, the largest contributor to the fact it takes that much longer is probably the fact that the eggs are at a different themselves at the moment I put them in. I used to store eggs in a cupboard; now I store them in the refrigerator. That is not to say the other factors mentioned by Martha and Sklivvz don't add to ...


6

Is there a difference in altitude between where you live now and where you used to live? The heat of a gas and an electric stove should be the same, but boiling temperature differs. The higher the altitude, the lower the boiling point, since it's a factor of air pressure. (More explanations from Wikipedia.) Water only boils at 100C at sea level. This site ...


5

What the others say is true, but ABSOLUTELY NOT TRUE for an electric induction cooker!! I used to think gas was better until I also moved into a flat with no gas. I was soon sick of it but I discovered induction and changed the basic electric cooker for an induction one. Now I know that an induction cooker is even better than gas because: It responds ...


5

Depends on what you mean by "cost effective", and what expectations you have of cooking evenness. A solid fuel stove will probably be cheapest (grandma style wood or coal oven), followed by a resistive electric stove and the most expensive stove being induction electric. This covers the initial cost of the stove itself. The quality of heating goes along ...


4

The only Pyrex that I'm aware of that was labeled as being safe for the cooktop was the 'Pyrex Visions' line, and I don't believe they ever made anything that I'd call a 'baking dish' from it. I know they made skillets, pots, and dutch ovens, and the associated lids. It's typically a sort of orange-brown color, and there were also some pink-ish ones. ...


4

There are two problems here: Not enough heat reaching the wok/food due to limited contact surface. Part of the heating element not being in contact with a cooling metal (pan/wok) and the heat reflected back at it (not escaping). This can result in a large temperature difference between the parts of the element that are in contact with the wok and parts ...


4

Cooking any item to well done is tricky. I suggest you use a variant of the method that restaurants often use: Place the seared hamburgers in a pre-heated 350 F oven until cooked through to your liking, probably another 10-15 minutes depending on thickness, temperature, and other idiosyncracies. You want an internal temperature of 160 F (measure with an ...


4

Good electric stoves often put out the same or more power (BTUs/hr) than gas stoves, and they are more efficient at transmitting the heat, as it is via conduction not radiation. This means that on a good electric stove, water will boil faster, heavy pans will heat up faster, etc. By a "good electric stove" I mean one that does not have a glass pane over ...


4

I had a question a few weeks ago regarding induction vs gas. Since that time, I have spoken with a few people who have switched to an induction range from either gas or electric. A couple of aspects not mentioned above, regarding differences between resistive electric and induction, are control and response. According to my sources, the temperature in a ...


4

Most reputable sources say that curved surfaces such as woks don't work as well on induction stoves. They even make special tools and cooktops for inductively heating woks. This phenomenum could be because of the angled surface or the extra distance from the cooktop, but it's probably both. It's not that these surfaces are immune to induction heating, just ...


3

Besides what @dmckee mentioned : No pilot light, so you're only using fuel when you need it. (except for the clock, if you have one) No failed electric starter, and having to go find matches for those that don't have a pilot. No chance of explosion from when you tried setting the gas so low the burner blows out. update : doesn't use hydrocarbons, ...


3

I think it may be a case of altering your cooking methods rather than finding a perfect pan (although we all wish we could do that). What sort of pans do you use? It sounds like you may be cooking your food on too high a heat. I'd suggest generally lowering the heat and ensure you stir your food regularly (unless your recipes suggest not stirring). Further ...


3

All cook top safety is the same: Keep it clean and pay attention! Glass ranges aren't inherently any more unsafe than a gas or normal electric range. Ranges are just a tool, one that generates a large amount of heat in a small area. Like any tool, you can hurt yourself or others if you don't follow the basic rules of use. Luckily, those rules are pretty ...


3

For anyone who wonders this about any burner, you can determine it empirically. With 2 of the same kind of pot or pan, put the same amount of water in each one. If you don't have measuring tools, just fill a cup or glass with water, pour it into one pan. Then do the same with the other pan. Set your burners both to high. If one boils well before ...


3

You could consider heating it up, while empty, in an oven (I would go for, say, 200C/390F). Keep it there for at least 30 minutes: the transfer of heat from the air to the cast iron is not very efficient! Then take it out quickly, pour the batter in, and return it to the oven until done (and then make the next batch, if you're making multiple). An issue ...


3

With most things I would guess you just need to turn it down and be more patient. A heavier pot will heat up slower, but if the hob is too hot food will still burn. If your cooker only does off or too hot it's broken and new pots won't fix it. About the rice, do you have the lid on the pot? Rice should steam rather than boil. Best method for rice I've ...


2

You can get a single or double burner induction cooktop. They are relatively inexpensive, most efficient electric burners, and perform well in cooking. You will need induction compatible cookware though. They are in most sense better than other electric cooktops. The old resistive element burners are cheaper though. Fuel based stoves have similar ...


2

Start slow, my electric stove surprised me after using gas for a while, with how hot it could get. Medium or even a little lower at first. The brown searing will come as the patty cooks, and there is no need to "seal in" flavor with an initial high-temp sear. When forming patties by hand, it is helpful to put a "dent" in the middle with your thumb, so the ...


1

Apart from blowing a fuse your problems may be worse than that. Most electrical appliances are designed with the assumption that all the components used are within specification. One example failure mode I can think of is that your new heating element may heat the attached wiring to unacceptable levels and increase its electrical resistance due to both the ...


1

In my limited experience with electric stoves and ovens, they heat the pan much faster than their gas cousins, because the heat is transmitted via conduction (metal on metal) instead of convection (flame heats pot). A pot or pan with a much thicker bottom will probably help since it won’t get as hot as fast, but I'd also try turning down the heat ...


1

Although I've seen stoves where you'd hook up what looked to be a propane cylinder, I don't know what hydrocarbon they were using. And as it was a built-in, it would've had the appropriate venting as required by code. If you're using a camping stove, you're going to run the risk of carbon monoxide build-up, particularly if you're using it when it's cold ...


1

I wok on an electric stove and have found there's a few tips to really help - its not perfect, but it helps: Preheat, preheat, preheat. Before you start any of your prep, put your wok on the stove and crank the heat. Let it heat up before you do anything at all to it. Make sure everything is at least at room temperature. We often use frozen stir fry ...



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