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16

It's the points/levels in the duty imposed that have made UK beer weak, from a historic point of view. Over 4% and you are on to a higher tariff point for the duty paid on it, so brewers aimed at 3.9x% for a long time, although there have been changes, and a lot of brewers find that people are prepared to pay a few pennies extra for a stronger brew these ...


14

I think the reason is the strong pub culture in Britain. The idea is you go to a pub, hang out, have some food, and generally spend an afternoon or evening socializing with your mates. For that purpose, a beer that is lower in alcohol is ideal, since you can sip numerous pints over the course of the evening without becoming drunk to a socially unacceptable ...


11

I'm english. I mitigate timing issues by warming a pyrex dish or just a plate by keeping it under the pan I am grilling the stuff in (or in the oven on very low usually with the door open), then putting the bits that are cooked in the pan to keep warm. Generally this is because I'm doing it for more than I can do on the grill in a single sitting though, ...


11

This may not be a perfect answer, since I'm Canadian - but our breakfast is pretty close to what you refer to as the English breakfast, minus the tomato. I think an "authentic" English breakfast is rather different, but that's another question entirely! If I understand correctly, you're hung up on two things, the first being timing and the second being ...


8

English muffins are not usually baked. Instead they are cooked in a skillet or on a griddle. You can bake English muffin dough, but it will turn out like a holey white bread (as you describe). To cook, heat a skillet or flat griddle to medium (temperature for a griddle would be 350 degrees F). Also preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. Brush the pan or ...


8

Is there some dialectical thing going on here? I have always known stews as stovetop and casseroles as baked, just as Jared said in his comment. See for example on wikipedia: stew vs. casserole; or in Merriam-Webster: stew (click the verb form) vs. casserole. (Casserole refers to the dish as well as the food cooked in it; it's pretty definitely something you ...


8

Yorkshire puddings rise because of the eggs in them. This means that the mixture for you Yorkshire puddings needs heat to rise So if your oven is not hot enough, they won't rise as much as you want. So here are some tips: -make sure your oven is hot before putting your puddings in -Don't open the oven while cooking your puddings -I always pre heat the ...


6

The simplest way to see the difference is to compare the cut diagrams: British French Images courtesy of Wikipedia The main difference is in how certain areas are sub-divided. We can see that faux-filet is part of the British sirloin, and entrecote is partly forerib and partly sirloin.


5

3.6% is not an uncommon strength for British bitter, and I strongly suspect that historically, even weaker beer was common. Brewing beer was the primary method of making water safe to drink and store, in Northern Europe, from prehistory right up until the 19th century when municipal water supplies began to be built. Since people would be drinking it all ...


5

My routine, cooking for 2 : Heat up grill. Put sausages on grill, with the expectation they will take 15-20 minutes to cook through - I usually use a larger sausage (something like this from our local award winners). Cut slices of bread, to make toast later. Break 3 eggs in a jug or bowl and quickly stir with a fork (the aim is to scramble, not to ...


5

In addition to Joe's great answer, in my childhood (where they were usually called 'bakes' (the food), but they came out of a 'casserole' (the vessel).) I learned two other important differences: time. A 'stew' was never done in less than 2 hours. It wasn't uncommon for it to bubble away in the crock pot or a dutch oven for 4 or 5 hours. A 'bake' by ...


4

As Jared mentioned, 'stewing' always involves a fair amount of liquid -- it's a slow, moist cooking process. It's not quite a braise, as with a braise, the item is only partially submerged, whereas with a stew, you have smaller chunks of things that might float, but for the most part are submerged. You can make really thick stews (I tend to grate a potato ...


4

Beer was once an important part of daily diet in Britain and Ireland and drunk in large quantities by both men and women throughout the day when working, for example, in the fields. So it needed to be weak. 25 years ago when I was a barman in the North of England standard bitter and lager were both around 3%, with only premium brands as much as 5%. And ...


4

The explanation I have been given by a mircobrewer is that it is, indeed, due to the duty levied on British beers - it's not so much a purely economic argument, it's as much a matter of principle of not wanting to give the government too much money. However, there are many excellent microbrewers opening in the UK (based on the American model!) serving their ...


3

One factor not mentioned in the other answers is that there is a class of cookware called a "casserole dish" -- ceramic or pyrex, somewhat shallow, often with a lid. I suppose it follows that a casserole is the kind of dish you prepare in such a vessel.


3

The proportions on everything look correct (including the milk!) EXCEPT that is a very small amount of butter for 3C flour. There is also no sugar in that recipe--and even a very small amount of sugar will change the texture of the dough. I personally would triple the amount of butter, add 2-3T sugar, and then re-try the recipe. VERY cold butter will also ...


3

That recipe has a very old style problem - it predates modern definitions of "cup". Methinks the cup in your recipe is a small coffee cup. If you are using 80g (3oz) of butter, that will make a good scone recipe with about 225g (8oz) of flour and about 150ml (5 fl.oz) of milk. I just weighed a 250mL cup of SR flour, it contained about 155g. The cup in the ...


3

I saw this Gordon Ramsey breakfast recently and it sounds like what you're looking for minus the sausage/bacon. The eggs are so artful. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxV9QLuEwZo


3

In today's modern culture and cooking style, the difference is likely unobserved. I would consider a stew less constructed than a casserole, however. While the stew would start with generally uncooked ingredients (perhaps except for browning the meat, and likely be mixed together while cooking to give a single-dish of meat, vegetables and sauce. A ...


3

I have "The Cookery of England" by Elisabeth Ayrton, and it seems to meet most of your conditions. The introduction is a brief history of traditional English food, there are historical anecdotes interspersed in the text, and yes, it has a recipe for scones, and also for cheese scones, but there is little food porn - sadly, the only picture is on the cover.


2

I like The River Cottage Meat Book. Obviously it's oriented around large hunks of meat, but, then again, so is most of British food. It has good pictures, and is nicely intimate. And scones are basically rich biscuits. They tend to have a bit more fat, and they have sugar added, as biscuits typically do not. If you can make a biscuit, you can make a scone. ...


2

The archetypal English chef was Philip Harben, the first ever TV chef. He wrote a lot of books - see the bibliography on his wikipedia entry - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Harben He's been dead forty years, but some of the books are still in print ... A very reliable booklet of English baking recipes is the Be-Ro Recipe Book, which is only easily ...


2

That's a very specific request! Not to mention the fact that Britain has had thousands of years to develop its food culture, so it's not a subject easily suited to a single book. However, if you go to Amazon.co.uk, navigate to Books > Food > Reference & Gastronomy and search within that for 'British', you get a fairly good selection. I think you might ...


2

A possible reason beer was originally drunk in quantity was because it is safer than bad water (beer is boiled during production and the alcohol discourages bacteria). I guess if it was 10% that wouldn't scale very well if you needed to get a day's work done too. There are lots of very strong beers produced in the UK and I'd hazard a guess that not all ...


1

Do you mean "liquor"? Liquor is a parsley sauce to which vinegar is often added. It's usually eaten with pie and mash.


1

I believe you are referring to coleslaw - it's actually cabbage rather than lettuce, and is considered a side-dish. It's often served with chips (French Fries here in the US) as an accompaniment to hot and cold roast meats as well as batter-fried dishes such as chicken, clams or fish. Coleslaw dressing can be creamy or vinegary in the US, and it's largely a ...


1

I thought I would try adding baking powder to see if my usually really good Yorkshire puddings would rise any more but no batter went like light cake mixture was a waste of time will stick with my old recipe. If having trouble add another egg I always use 2 and not the recommended one and they are brilliant. Don't know why I messed around


1

I found a great recipe for English muffins, which is a variation on Alton Brown's recipe. Basically, the variation calls for adding a bit of baking soda after proofing the dough. I've made this recipe a couple of times, with very satisfying results. The yeast flavor is a bit strong for those used to store-bought, but I like it.


1

One issue that doesn't seem to have been addressed is the effect of 2 World Wars. Significant drops in beer strength and pub hour restrictions were all born from a need to conserve grain supplies for the war. This does help explain the strange closing times of pubs in the UK and Ireland. The info about the taxation seem spot on!


1

I'm sure it's the "duty" as most people said. I had no idea the percentages were this low until recently. The English beers I saw over here (east coast US) are usually the ESBs and have a normal percentage. Most micros over here have 5-6.9% with special styles being over 7% up to 11%. As a home brewer I noticed the style guides for bitters have some of the ...



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