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16

Your pan is NOT ruined.YAY! What has happened is that you have burned off most of the seasoning. Any other kind of pan would be ruined, but your cast iron pan only needs to be stripped and reseasoned. If you have a self-cleaning oven cycle, that is a great way to completely strip the pan. You can also throw it into a hot fire (like a fireplace, wood stove, ...


5

EDIT: The cookware used is by Zwilling JA Henckels. They are Thermolon-coated, which is why I mistook it for a Green Pan--they are the same coating (ceramic.) You can see the cookware used in the show here: http://shop.foodnetworkstore.com/nav/department/cookware/show/chopped/0 My original guesstimation: This looks like a Green Pan, an attempt to make ...


5

That is probably not deep enough to get an accurate reading. It varies with the thermometer, but usually you need at least a couple of centimetres to be submerged to get an accurate reading. Also, unless you are super careful, it will be nearly impossible to stop the thermometer touching the bottom of the pan. In my experience the clips on these doohickies ...


3

Your pan is certainly not ruined but it will take some work to restore it to it's former glory. The "rusty stuff" comment is a bit worrying though. It could be just overheated oils, but it could also be real rust. Rub it between your fingers - is it smooth and chunky, or more like sand? Let it dry completely then heat it with an open flame - does it smoke ...


3

I've used the harsch crocks myself - for longer ferments (3-8 weeks). However I've used the giant glass pickle jars for beets when making kvas for borscht. The thing with the harsch is it takes the guessing out - once you seal it you don't really have to worry about anything except keeping the little water lip filled. Fermenting in glass jars, to me, ...


2

Utility knives are tweeners, not good for paring and far less useful than a 6-8" chef's knife for cutting vegetables and meats. After looking at mine for years, and using it only rarely, I converted it to a letter opener, a task at which it excels.


2

I have had my pan just less than two years and today I noticed the coating was peeling off. At first I thought it was just grease build up and used a plastic spatula to try and scrape it off, but it soon became clear that it was the non stick coating. Not impressed!


2

While there isn't one specific brand that is common to the cooking tools and supplies you might normally see in a restaurant kitchen, the items will undoubtedly be certified by NSF International (NSF stands for 'National Sanitation Foundation' - NOT 'National Science Foundation' here). It is probably a good idea to get in the habit of looking for that ...


2

Pictured below is the Ginsu Shoku Series Anodized Cutlery. But this sort of thing is largely gimmicky, the kind of thing you see on knives at roving Gun & Knife Shows. If there were legitimate and truly competitive reasons, not cosmetic ones, to employ anodization we can pretty well bet this is something all major cutlery concerns would have already ...


2

This apparently is normal for at least some GE ovens, as can be gleaned from Consumer Affairs complaints filed by Gary of Port Angeles, WA, Eileen of Henderson, NV, and Susan of Portland, OR. In two of the three complaints the smoke became intense enough even to discolor the oven-door glass. (A good deal can be inferred from that, but doesn't need ...


1

I think your problem might have changed now. Considering you've now burnt off all the left over residue the smell is likely now being caused by the smoke and debris left behind inside your oven. Id be willing to bet if you gave it a good clean over with a bit of soap, then a thorough rinse with just water. You'll find the smell has gone. Hope this helps.


1

There are certain details missing here that would make this problem easier to solve. I would want to know what kind of pan you're using, what kind of oil you're using, and what temperature you're shooting for. However, even without knowing these things in an other than general way, there is still an approach you can use which will meet your stated aims. ...


1

I hope this doesn't sound in any way off base, but in my opinion the greatest advantage a restaurant kitchen has over the typical home kitchen is counter space, meaning room to spread out the multiple aspects of what goes into preparing an excellent dish. So anything one can do to expand or open up existing counter space at home has the potential to reap ...


1

After searching online for weeks and coming up fruitless, I got some terrific smaller jars (2 1/2 qt) at a local Target. Glazed ceramic with wooden lids. Easy to drill a hole if you like, but I found it easier to pull off the rubber gasket which made it loose-fitting enough to breathe as-is. $15 or so.


1

How small? You could use mason jars...or even plastic quart containers. I frequently use Cambro brand food containers. The key is to use food safe products and avoid material that is worn or cracked, which could harbor bacteria...other than that, almost anything can work.


1

Alright. I did it. I took photos, but it might be only later before I can upload them. The Equipment. Small macchinetta, enough for two small tea glasses. The Process. I put about half the height of the holding chamber. In retrospect, I could have gone even 2/3rd of the height. Edit: I just opened up the pot, to clean it up, it seems that my amount was ...



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