Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

Typically, you don't want to buy a 'set' of knives. You're better off buying the knives that you specifically want. Often, you'll want to get a mix of knives from different manufacturers, so that you can get the best knife for each purpose. As for what to look for ... I'd have to say that the main issues these days are weight, handle, and how the knife is ...


13

Mineral oil is your friend As you said, Ana, the biggest enemy of a clean — and warp-free — wood cutting board is moisture penetration. The first trick to fight this is to wipe down your cutting board fairly often with mineral oil or other food-safe wood treatment. This helps with cleaning as it prevents liquids and bacteria from penetrating into the wood. ...


10

Don't buy a set. You've had a set for a while, so you know which knives you gravitate to. Spend your money there. Don't waste your money on knives you don't use 'cause they look nice in the block.


7

SUMMARY: Glass containers are perfectly fine for fermentation. It's usually other design aspects of the container that create fermentation problems. Do you have any sources that actually say glass isn't a good container for fermentation? I've never heard or read that anywhere. The only negative thing I can say about glass is that it's usually ...


5

I usually scrub mine clean with a stiff brush, rinse it off, dry it off, and then lightly spray it with a vinegar solution and let it dry in a well ventilated place. I also keep my board oiled, which helps with all this. More importantly, I don't submerge it in hot water and soap because it may cause the glue holding the boards together to come apart ...


4

I cannot tell you how they do it at that specific location, how your method differs, or what you're doing wrong. I don't really even know exactly how you're brewing your coffee. However, I can tell you how to brew a consistent cup using the best possible practices. Here's a list of things to consider Grind your coffee immediately(not the night before) ...


4

America's Test Kitchen did a show on knife sets recently, and reported similar findings to what has already been noted here by the other commenters. I am only including this as it is technically a set, but you simply buy the components based on their own merit and not what the manufacturer is trying to get rid of/sell you. Per America's Test Kitchen: ...


3

This should help, it's not precisely exact, but you can probably figure it out from here.


3

I saw this in action at my brother in law's wedding. His uncle, who is a chef on a ship, prepared the wedding meal in the inlaws' home kitchen. He was actually used preparing food for a ship's company in a much smaller kitchen. The only thing he did that was "different" equipment wise was he spent some time sharpening the knives before he started. It was ...


3

I agree it's quite believable. Most restaurant equipment is more about cooking in bulk than being particularly specialized things you can't get at home. So it's extra durable/stays sharp longer or is just big (like a fridge). It really doesn't take much money to make good food though. A lot of the gadgets and gizmos that you see on TV can be replaced with ...


2

OK, after some fitting of screws and so on, I think I managed to find the correct fit. Jolene's picture also helped. The two pointy screws get indeed screwed into the ham, but there is enough flesh and sinew that I don't have to go into the bone with them. This is lucky, because getting a screw in when using only a tiny L-shaped "screwdriver" greased with ...


2

Thank you very much for your help! I eventually decided to get this tool (Genius Salad Chef Junior). Works like a charm. Here's what I've tried it with: Cucumbers - great Tomatoes - works, but a bit hard to push through completely Apples - great Cheese - very hard to push through, but works Carrots - great Smoked salmon - doesn't work It should be ...


2

After helping out with a few events over the years, with one of the places that we hold events renovating but removing almost all of the catering/serving gear in the process, some additional suggestions from someone who's still a notice: Try to visit where you'll be serving the food in advance, to make sure that you're familiar with the facilities, and ...


2

Most restaurant equipment meets particular safety requirements or durability requirements. While there are some fancy pieces of large equipment that do specialized things (deep fryers, combi ovens), the vast majority of restaurant food can be reproduced at home with typical home kitchen tools. While made for entertainment, the scene you described is ...


2

Yes, they are still safe to use. You aren't going to be able to heat them to the point where the metal starts breaking down — at least, not without starting a fire. Your only concern might be if your pots have a nonstick coating, which can be damaged above temperatures of 500 F and begin emitting noxious fumes. According to DuPont: The fumes that are ...


1

Nobody has mentioned the "traditional" methods of using salt (alone) or salt with lemon juice. After scraping off bits and crumbs, rinse off under a tap, scrubbing with a hard bristled brush if necessary, for example if stained by food like parsley, red cabbage, etc. Dry off excess water with a paper towel, then whilst still damp sprinkle salt over the ...


1

I prefer the vinegar solution as rfusca mentioned, I actually keep a spray bottle of white vinegar for general house cleaning. But you can also use a bleach/water solution as well. You soak it in a bleach/water solution for 2 minutes then rinse it off with a lot of water. I know some people who only do the bleach once or twice a year for a really deep clean ...


1

I want to emphasize that clean filtered water is the most important step to making great tasting coffee. Starbucks uses commercial Everpure dual filter systems to run their machines and their filtered faucets. An Everpure setup will run you around $350 and $100 a year for filter replacements. If that isn't something you would want to spend that much on, ...


1

I generally wash the opener by hand but occasionally run it though the dishwasher. In both cases, after it is dry, I occasionally put drops of food grade mineral oil on the gears, etc. I use almond oil. I also use almond oil on my wooden cutting boards. (almond oil is a wonderful skin softener, too). Swing-a-way was a great brand back in the day but the ...


1

Here's the simple answer: use soap & hot water to clean your board and knife. That's it. Read the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service pages on cutting boards and food safety and preventing cross-contamination. There are heaps of more food safety info there, as well. America's Test Kitchen confirmed this with actual bacteria cultures to see what ...


1

Coming from a beer brewer's perspective, I would imagine that letting it sit longer, even overnight, would help. It gives the CO2 time to dissolve into the liquid, rather than just adding pressure.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible