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12

You can get better cooling with less dry ice by using a cooling bath. Chunks of dry ice mixed with isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol, isopropanol) will give you a liquid with a temperature of -77°C (-106.6 °F). The liquid will transfer heat to the botton of a metal dish far more efficiently than solid or granulated dry ice.


6

I have used dry ice trying to recreate Heston Blumenthal's Dry Ice Ice cream, where you leave the ice cream mixture in a stand mixer that's still mixing, and bit by bit pour powdered dry ice into the mixer, which should sublime evenly and neatly, leaving you with ice cream in five minutes. I also used leftover dry ice to do what I imagined to be something ...


5

Just a few additional possibly-obvious practical considerations for #2 and #3 that I didn't see in previous discussion, with the caveat that I've not actually tried to anti-griddle before: Dry ice is carbon dioxide after all, so be sure to have sufficient ventilation; Wikipedia tells me breathing too much results in "hypercapnia"; Make the best use of the ...


4

That's a hand blender, or immersion blender. They're common, Amazon has a bunch of them. Here's one with interchangeable blades.


3

I own a similar square grill pan and have always had luck cleaning it with a stainless steel scouring sponge and lightly soapy water. The spongy texture is very effective at getting down into the grooves. No need to be especially vigorous - a couple quick passes will take out accumulated residues, and you can use a regular sponge afterward if you like. ...


2

I built a little wooden impeller for my food processor that hits the cloves hard enough to peel them, but not hard enough to gouge or break them: The center piece is an old dough mixer blade for the food processor. The wood is maple; pine is too weak. The rubber flaps on the bottom, screwed on, keep the cloves moving so they'll collide with the wood. I've ...


2

For what it's worth, I use one of these (not filled with soap, obviously -- it's my dedicated cast iron brush), oil, and salt to clean my grill pan. I use to curse and go through lots of paper towels until I tried this, and it has worked great for me: http://www.oxo.com/p-815-steel-soap-dispensing-palm-brush.aspx


2

Yes. The crew at Momofuku in New York invented a heat gun called the Searzall for exactly this purpose. Bon Appetit has an article on it; they're raising production funds through Kickstarter.


2

I use my wood spoon shaped like your #5 when I am cooking and stirring liquids such as for sauces or puddings. It allows for a good stir without causing spills, and the flat bottom lets me be sure to scrape the bottom and corner of the saucepan as I stir. Mine now has a crack in it and so I am on the look out for another. They're hard to find with a flat end ...


2

The phenomenon is called magnetostriction, and occurs when the oscillating magnetic field causes the cookware to change shape rapidly. This frequency will be twice that of the electromagnetic field of the cooker, which is typically over 20kHz, which means that the base frequency of the vibrations is well into the inaudible range of the spectrum. However, ...


1

I doubt that it will work. A butane torch can provide a temperature of up to 1700K (1,430 °C; 2,600 °F) (according to Wikipedia), whereas I haven't seen any electric ones claiming to go above 600°C (1100°F). While 600°C seems plenty warm to get a decent Maillard reaction going, it will take much longer than with a higher temperature, and you will probably ...


1

How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a video from Chefs Armoury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TPDgdo7jfM 1. Prep your stones Depending on what stones you use, you may need to soak or not. I use the Naniwa stones that just ...


1

I solved the problem by removing the outer "Panarello" wand and using the inner steam wand to stretch my milk, it gives you much more control and with a little practice it works a treat and produces nice glossy stretched milk perfect for latte art.


1

French press or filters are pretty easy and don't need much storage space. You could also just use a regular pot or saucepan, although that can be really tricky at first, and might be more trouble than it's worth. You could get one of those little moka stove-top coffee makers though. They're pretty convenient and don't need much storage space at all.


1

Spoon #2 is perfect for snatching a piece of pasta (not spaghetti) from a pot full of boiling water. It drains the pasta (let's say penne) and leaves the water behind. Also cools the penne quicker so it can be sampled for done-ness.



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