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9

That is usually called a rubber spatula, even though they're rarely made of rubber. The ones I find most useful are made of silicone, and are heatproof. This one by OXO is one of my favorite gadgets. They're for stirring and for clean scraping bowls and jars and such. The heatproof ones are great for use with non-stick cookware while sauteing.


7

This is a collection of identifications from existing answers. If you know what something is, please add it here, rather than adding yet another answer - and remember to explain how you use it! 1. An egg scissor. Lee Valley used to sell some as recently as this century. You hold it like scissors, open the blades, put the circle over the top of your ...


4

Although I grew up calling them a 'rubber spatula' (and most of 'em are silicone these days), I've also heard them referred to as a 'rubber scaper'. There are also 'bowl scapers' which are effectively a larger head of a rubber scraper; there's no handle, which gives you better leverage for really scaping sticky things out of a large bowl.


4

I built a little wooden impeller for my food processor that hits the cloves hard enough to peel them, but not hard enough to gouge or break them: The center piece is an old dough mixer blade for the food processor. The wood is maple; pine is too weak. The rubber flaps on the bottom, screwed on, keep the cloves moving so they'll collide with the wood. I've ...


4

That's a hand blender, or immersion blender. They're common, Amazon has a bunch of them. Here's one with interchangeable blades.


3

As you may already know, meat becomes tender when cooking because collagen (which is chewy) breaks down into gelatin (which isn't chewy), and the longer it cooks, the more collagen is broken down. Having said that, if the bag in the conventional oven was in for closer to 4h and the bag in the steam oven was in for closer to 6h, it's kind of obvious why the ...


3

I own a similar square grill pan and have always had luck cleaning it with a stainless steel scouring sponge and lightly soapy water. The spongy texture is very effective at getting down into the grooves. No need to be especially vigorous - a couple quick passes will take out accumulated residues, and you can use a regular sponge afterward if you like. ...


3

You don't stir with the knives; the process is called 'cutting in'. You can find videos showing how to do it, but the basic technique is: cut the butter into smaller bits toss the butter bits into the flour mixture. hold a knife in either hand pull the knives across each other, while keeping them touching the bottom of the bowl. You can also hold your ...


3

You need to incorporate the butter into the flour such that the butter is in hazelnut sized lumps, without melting the butter. If you chop it that small on a board it will soften as you handle it. So you have to do it in the bowl. You could buy a pastry cutter/dough blender but to be honest they are a pain in the wrist. If you have a food processor, you ...


3

The Ozeri Deluxe milk frother claims an rpm of 15000 rpm http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BISKPMG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00BISKPMG&linkCode=as2&tag=nmjv-20 However I have seen in ikea (and pound / dollar stores) a much cheaper option that to me seems much the same ...


2

Could it be for frying a wrapped dough and pulling it out of the oil?


2

For what it's worth, I use one of these (not filled with soap, obviously -- it's my dedicated cast iron brush), oil, and salt to clean my grill pan. I use to curse and go through lots of paper towels until I tried this, and it has worked great for me: http://www.oxo.com/p-815-steel-soap-dispensing-palm-brush.aspx


1

Using knives is an old fashioned way to "cut butter." Which really means make the butter into smaller pieces that are then coated with flour. The best way I've found is to skip knives, pastry blenders, or the mess of my food processor, and instead freeze the butter and instead use a box grater, shredding the butter on the largest hole side. Shred the butter ...


1

How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a video from Chefs Armoury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TPDgdo7jfM 1. Prep your stones Depending on what stones you use, you may need to soak or not. I use the Naniwa stones that just ...


1

I solved the problem by removing the outer "Panarello" wand and using the inner steam wand to stretch my milk, it gives you much more control and with a little practice it works a treat and produces nice glossy stretched milk perfect for latte art.


1

the blade and plates are usually not stainless even if the rest of the unit is. I always figured it was because stainless (while harder and better and holding an edge) is somewhat brittle and could flake off from bits of bone. just a thought though.


1

Spoon #2 is perfect for snatching a piece of pasta (not spaghetti) from a pot full of boiling water. It drains the pasta (let's say penne) and leaves the water behind. Also cools the penne quicker so it can be sampled for done-ness.



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