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I have this rice cooker, although it's branded "National", not "Panasonic". It has a perforated platform that you can put in after the rice and water, and it sits about an inch above the bottom of the pot. Perfect for steaming salmon filets. It's not a deep fryer nor a slow cooker.


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Yes, there is something like a slow cooker which will double as a steamer and a deep fryer, as well as cook rice. NOT all at once, obviously, but a really good quality, heavy-bottomed large stainless steel pan + lid + a steamer inset + a rice ball like this: should fulfil all your requirements without too many gadgets or "stuff" cluttering your kitchen ...


1

Food grade antifoam. There are a zillion brands. Looks like most are silicone based.


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I was walking the beach today (after a pacific storm last night) and was dumbfounded at the 2-3 ft mounds of foam for a mile along the beach. Looked it up and it comes from algae (green protein super foods) being churned up in the rough seas. Same when I juice green, dense vegetables in my auger juicer. I just stir it into the juice as best I can and ...


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If you are washing it every day, you should only need to use a kitchen sponge after beating out the leaves lightly. You should not need vinegar and should never use bleach, as bleach can cause many metals to rust. if this strainer was sold with the teapot, treat it like gold - sometimes it can be hard to find a strainer that fits in your tea pot PERFECTLY ...


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We have a GE stove and experienced this the first few times we used it. Our model happened to be self-cleaning so we ran it through a self-cleaning cycle and after that the smell never came back.


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This apparently is normal for at least some GE ovens, as can be gleaned from Consumer Affairs complaints filed by Gary of Port Angeles, WA, Eileen of Henderson, NV, and Susan of Portland, OR. In two of the three complaints the smoke became intense enough even to discolor the oven-door glass. (A good deal can be inferred from that, but doesn't need ...


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I think your problem might have changed now. Considering you've now burnt off all the left over residue the smell is likely now being caused by the smoke and debris left behind inside your oven. Id be willing to bet if you gave it a good clean over with a bit of soap, then a thorough rinse with just water. You'll find the smell has gone. Hope this helps.


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I have had my pan just less than two years and today I noticed the coating was peeling off. At first I thought it was just grease build up and used a plastic spatula to try and scrape it off, but it soon became clear that it was the non stick coating. Not impressed!


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Pictured below is the Ginsu Shoku Series Anodized Cutlery. But this sort of thing is largely gimmicky, the kind of thing you see on knives at roving Gun & Knife Shows. If there were legitimate and truly competitive reasons, not cosmetic ones, to employ anodization we can pretty well bet this is something all major cutlery concerns would have already ...


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Utility knives are tweeners, not good for paring and far less useful than a 6-8" chef's knife for cutting vegetables and meats. After looking at mine for years, and using it only rarely, I converted it to a letter opener, a task at which it excels.


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EDIT: The cookware used is by Zwilling JA Henckels. They are Thermolon-coated, which is why I mistook it for a Green Pan--they are the same coating (ceramic.) You can see the cookware used in the show here: http://shop.foodnetworkstore.com/nav/department/cookware/show/chopped/0 My original guesstimation: This looks like a Green Pan, an attempt to make ...


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There are certain details missing here that would make this problem easier to solve. I would want to know what kind of pan you're using, what kind of oil you're using, and what temperature you're shooting for. However, even without knowing these things in an other than general way, there is still an approach you can use which will meet your stated aims. ...


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That is probably not deep enough to get an accurate reading. It varies with the thermometer, but usually you need at least a couple of centimetres to be submerged to get an accurate reading. Also, unless you are super careful, it will be nearly impossible to stop the thermometer touching the bottom of the pan. In my experience the clips on these doohickies ...


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Your pan is certainly not ruined but it will take some work to restore it to it's former glory. The "rusty stuff" comment is a bit worrying though. It could be just overheated oils, but it could also be real rust. Rub it between your fingers - is it smooth and chunky, or more like sand? Let it dry completely then heat it with an open flame - does it smoke ...


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There are many MYTH's about cast iron. Read this FIRST: http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/the-truth-about-cast-iron.html . My response: No big deal. In the restaurant we always had two cast iron pans on the back burners going white hot for the entire shift. 8 hours straight at times. While/before it cools, throw some salt into it and toss it around a ...


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Your pan is NOT ruined.YAY! What has happened is that you have burned off most of the seasoning. Any other kind of pan would be ruined, but your cast iron pan only needs to be stripped and reseasoned. If you have a self-cleaning oven cycle, that is a great way to completely strip the pan. You can also throw it into a hot fire (like a fireplace, wood stove, ...


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Mineral oil! Light soap and water after use. Let it dry and oil as needed depending on use. I've made a hundred boards as gifts and love to visit friends that still have them in their kitchens.


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While there isn't one specific brand that is common to the cooking tools and supplies you might normally see in a restaurant kitchen, the items will undoubtedly be certified by NSF International (NSF stands for 'National Sanitation Foundation' - NOT 'National Science Foundation' here). It is probably a good idea to get in the habit of looking for that ...


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I hope this doesn't sound in any way off base, but in my opinion the greatest advantage a restaurant kitchen has over the typical home kitchen is counter space, meaning room to spread out the multiple aspects of what goes into preparing an excellent dish. So anything one can do to expand or open up existing counter space at home has the potential to reap ...


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Alright. I did it. I took photos, but it might be only later before I can upload them. The Equipment. Small macchinetta, enough for two small tea glasses. The Process. I put about half the height of the holding chamber. In retrospect, I could have gone even 2/3rd of the height. Edit: I just opened up the pot, to clean it up, it seems that my amount was ...


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I used Colgate or any brand toothpaste and a cotton ball scrubbed, then scrubbed with the rough side of a soapy sponge BINGO it did the trick..nice and clean!!!


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Pillsbury croissant roll dough, two triangles pinched together to make a "slice" put your cheese meat and cheese layer between two squares of dough and put that into your waffle maker. I set mine on high, took it about 4 minutes to make it golden, another minute super crunchy and delicious.


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Which container is, as you say, best for fermenting vegetables may not have a concrete, objective answer, because what is ideal for fermenting one vegetable (singular, plural, seasoned or not) may not be ideal for fermenting another. The Korean onggi however has a long history of effective use as a fermentation container owing apparently to not only its ...


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I've used the harsch crocks myself - for longer ferments (3-8 weeks). However I've used the giant glass pickle jars for beets when making kvas for borscht. The thing with the harsch is it takes the guessing out - once you seal it you don't really have to worry about anything except keeping the little water lip filled. Fermenting in glass jars, to me, ...


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After searching online for weeks and coming up fruitless, I got some terrific smaller jars (2 1/2 qt) at a local Target. Glazed ceramic with wooden lids. Easy to drill a hole if you like, but I found it easier to pull off the rubber gasket which made it loose-fitting enough to breathe as-is. $15 or so.


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Tip from Science: There isn't any doubt that vacuum is the best way to go. What could pass less heat from one side to the other than 'nothing' material. Air is good but not nearly as good as a vacuum. However, a true vacuum creates a lot of pressure on the mug walls because of 15lbs/sq inch of air pressing on the walls of the mug with no resistance from the ...


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How small? You could use mason jars...or even plastic quart containers. I frequently use Cambro brand food containers. The key is to use food safe products and avoid material that is worn or cracked, which could harbor bacteria...other than that, almost anything can work.


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One possible reason for this would be if the cooktop used induction, where rather than heating up, it used electromagnest to cause the pan to heat up. For this to work, the pan must be ferrous and able to be magnetized. Although stainless steel is made from iron, it isn't strongly magnetic, and thus will not work well on an induction cooker. To test if ...



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