New answers tagged

0

I probably do it all wrong or completely unprofessionally, but here it is: I use microfiber cloths (silk before microfiber became available), so they don't leave any filaments or lint on the food. Then I rinse my microfiber cloths in an ice cream bucket full of hot, soapy water with Dawn antibacterial dish soap (the kind they use to take oil off of animals), ...


0

I have had a glass cooktop for about 20 years and have used my cast iron cookware with great results all that time. I wipe the cooktop off after it cools every time I use it, which is super easy since it is smooth. I love the cooktop and have had no problems what so ever!


2

I have tried an air fryer. It is very convenient, but if it is the ultimate taste you want (whether it's fried food or roasted food, health/oil issues aside) then no, it can't beat deep fat frying or oven roasting. Having said that, it is a good speedy compromise when in a hurry.


2

It's really easier to do with icing, but if you make a really pale dough such as a sugar cookie dough, you can color it. I once made pie-chart shaped cookies by doing this, then making wedges in various colors & sizes, then squishing them all back together into a log, and slicing it into rounds. I don't know if it was the colors that I was using, but I ...


1

Barkode is right. Also consider electric pressure cookers. There are many on the market. Mine has many modes programmed in, most notable: slow cooker (ie. crockpot), rice cooker, pressure cooking. You could also experiment with foregoing the long steam. With my pressure cooker, I put in frozen chicken tenders and in 18 minutes they are done. They probably ...


1

If you search "multi cooker" on Amazon, you'll see a multitude of devices similar to the one you linked and the vast majority of them are able to do what you're asking. Another option that would defintely be worth considering since you're already accustomed to preparing the sort of dishes you're wanting to make with your rice cooker is upgrading to a ...


4

There were five dishes mentioned in that post: Poffertjes (dutch pancake puffs). Small, shallow impressions. Æbleskiver (danish pancake balls). Large, deep (half-spherical) impressions. Takoyaki (japanese octopus pancake balls). Small, deep (half-spherical) impressions with a lip around the edge. Kanom Krok (thai coconut pancake snack). small, (various ...


2

For a fondue bourguignonne (oil) or Chinoise (broth), raw ingredients are cooked in the pot, which means you need to get the liquid at least close to a boil, i.e. in the 90-100 C range. The burner under your model should easily supply enough heat. For chocolate fondue, this would mean the chocolate would burn almost instantly. If you serve a chocolate ...


0

I almost forget my question here. Some months after asking here, I found the solution to my specific needs (which are: kneading bread dough, once or twice a month). I got the TURMIX handmixer and it works like charm for my needs. However, I agree with the other answers. If you are making bread on a regular basis, get a bread-making machine.


0

The high carbon steel knifes are self sharpening as much as they are rust prone. You may have to sharpen it under heavy use but on gentle use on veggies you'll eventually get an edge that will last a decade or more. As the edge wears sharp, will the sides. A thinner blade will result. My mother has been using these types of knifes for 80 years.


6

There are kits available for making your own custom molds from food-grade silicone. The finished molds can be used for various cooking purposes including candy making and baking. The laboratory I work for has used products made by The Smooth-On Company for many years and they are of high quality: ...


0

If speed is the main requirement, you can't get any faster than a Magic Bullet.


2

For many years I have been using both cast iron and cast aluminum Dutch ovens to prepare everything from main courses to desserts on river trips. I have thousands of hours of cooking time experience with both types, and I have seen no differences at all other than weight - the aluminum oven weighs about one third to one fourth less than the cast iron oven. ...


-1

With reference to the first statement that electric heating elements used to hold a constant temperature compared to today's, clearly visible, on, off cycle of heat. Older manfgr's use to make controls with rheostats that allowed the user to adjust the flow of electricity thereby controlling the amount of electricity used to generate heat in the element. ...


2

I submitted an edit to fix up your question because it sounded like a product recommendation. Can you also provide more info, like what you would be using them for? Here are a few characteristics I looked for in my recent purchase: Thickness - thinner spatulas would be easier to slide under food Stiffness in the handle - better for stirring soups, stews ...


2

Take two lids off any size food storage container you find fitting. Fill one with as many grape tomatoes your heart desires. Place the second lid on top facing down. Take a serrated bread knife and cut the tomatoes in half between the lids. Mine is in fact a 13" so I can cut about 12 boxes of cherry tomatoes in half in under 2 minutes.


2

I have a a few of each I don't k ow much about the science behind the making of them but personally I find I can get a super sharp edge on my carbon steel knives in no time at all which they hold well where as it takes me longer to get a no where near as sharp edge on my stainless steel knives and they don't hold it as long. This however could simply be my ...


3

The operating temperature range is the ambient (surrounding air) temperatures under which you can have the thermometer on, and it'll function properly (give correct readouts) and not excessively shorten its lifespan. Almost all electronic devices can take higher temperatures when they're off. This is a combination of several things, including especially ...


1

You can't do it. Cooking vessels are divided into reactive and non-reactive. Practically all uncoated metal pots (except for stainless steel) are reactive. This means that they will leach an off taste into the food. There is no way around it, and seasoning won't help either. It is effective for frying, but not boiling. If you want to have no metal leached ...


3

Looks like it means that the thermometer will function between 32 and 122 F. So, don't expect it to function if it's in your freezer and don't expect it to function properly at temps greater than 122 F. The difference between 122 F and 190 F is that at 122 F the thermometer won't work (possibly it will work but will have reduced accuracy) but it will ...


3

It's the range at which it will display an accurate reading. Or in some cases, any reading. Update : I guess the terminology is different for this thermometer, as it says "Guaranteed accuracy ±2°F to 248°F" suggesting that it can handle 248°F ... so I'm guessing that in this case, it's talking about the ambient air temperature. (and it's possible that the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included