New answers tagged

4

We have two (a coincidentially matching pair) of these at home. They have a few uses: Ours are similar proportions to steak knives, and they work very well for that (or pizza). I sometimes call them "cheese sandwich knives", because they cut both bread and cheese (and tomatoes if that's your thing). This means they're good for taking on picnics or for ...


4

You are not missing anything, that is a cheap serrated "no sharpening" knife from a set. The only possible advantage to it would be when cutting soft tomatoes, where having a bit of serration helps. For that I use a bread knife anyway, so I'd say you have no use for that knife at all in the kitchen.


10

I have never tried it but when I googled wok burners (thinking to find a standalone high-output gas hob), I found this article about a wok ring called the "WokMon" on Serious Eats and had to post it here: A couple months ago I was approached by Glen Lee, an inventor who claimed to have an ingenious new device for cooking in a wok at home. Seemed to me ...


3

You could try using a vegetable dicer. This professional one specifically says it works for chicken breast. If you have a lot of chicken to dice it maybe worth it, but it won't be real quick to clean. If this is too much machine for what you want to accomplish, smaller home versions are made, something like this home vegetable dicer might work for you. ...


2

A food processor on pulse setting should be able to do thing.


0

Sometimes the vacuum in the jar causes a lot of friction between the lid and the jar. Holding the jar upside down and banging a few times on the bottom with your palm can get some air inside and free the lid.


0

I don't know about "tools" but I think you're using the wrong paper. I love parchment paper for some things but this is not an optimal use of it. You should be using plastic wrap, which is much more similar to the plastic used to hold the tubes of dough. Parchment paper is too rigid to shape the ends of the log without odd creases. Plastic wrap is strong ...


2

It really seems to be dependent on the consistency of the dough. Some cookie doughs won't hold shape, as they contain lots of butter and very little flour - chocolate chip cookies are a good example. The upside is that you won't need to shape them into round slices before you bake them, because once in the oven, they'll melt into one big more-or-less round ...


0

Spray with oven cleaner, foam up ,let it rest for 10 to 15 minutes scrub with sponge with rough side,rinse, dry with paper towels, season pan put away ready for next time. I also spray lightly with Pam before I start cooking


6

A sausage stuffer, perhaps? Your standard food mill attachment type more typically seen in a home kitchen: Unless you're seeing some product I've never met, I would not call that stuff "rolled in tubes" - I'd call it a tube (or log) of dough, and I expect the filling process is VERY like a (large, automated) sausage stuffer, and involves no rolling at ...


0

Watt specifies the power of the device. Power is defined as energy per unit time. So watt is how quickly your device consumes energy. If it is an efficient device it will convert more of consumed electricity into heat. So given two equally efficient devices the higher watt one will produce more heat faster and can therefore cook faster than the less watt ...


0

I probably do it all wrong or completely unprofessionally, but here it is: I use microfiber cloths (silk before microfiber became available), so they don't leave any filaments or lint on the food. Then I rinse my microfiber cloths in an ice cream bucket full of hot, soapy water with Dawn antibacterial dish soap (the kind they use to take oil off of animals), ...


0

I have had a glass cooktop for about 20 years and have used my cast iron cookware with great results all that time. I wipe the cooktop off after it cools every time I use it, which is super easy since it is smooth. I love the cooktop and have had no problems what so ever!


2

I have tried an air fryer. It is very convenient, but if it is the ultimate taste you want (whether it's fried food or roasted food, health/oil issues aside) then no, it can't beat deep fat frying or oven roasting. Having said that, it is a good speedy compromise when in a hurry.


2

It's really easier to do with icing, but if you make a really pale dough such as a sugar cookie dough, you can color it. I once made pie-chart shaped cookies by doing this, then making wedges in various colors & sizes, then squishing them all back together into a log, and slicing it into rounds. I don't know if it was the colors that I was using, but I ...



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