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Depending on which manufacturer they may have differences in operation. It would be best to check that manufacturer's website for a explanation, or the instruction manual. example 3 page guide You should find a wealth of information by searching "Oven Settings Explained"


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A cooker/range hood. The proper sort will suck in all that greasy fumes, pass them through a carbon filter (which needs changing) and vents it outside, or upwards(in smaller kitchens without a place to vent it. Its also helpful if you're cooking something that may have irritating fumes. There's pretty much nothing that will mitigate the problem as well.


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If a dishwasher is present, get dishwasher-safe boxes with a lid on them, and store less frequently used items in these boxes. Whenever doing a "deep clean" of your kitchen, put the boxes in the dishwasher while sorting out the contents.


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Use less fat and a lower temperature. Can also use grease a screen. Grease will vaporize and then condense on walls / surfaces. Without a fan that is going to happen. Can also bake or crock or ....


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The "brand" seems remarkably shy - no website could be found for them, and no vendor admits what the non-stick coating actually is in this case. It appears (via internet picture) visually similar to the coating on "Bakers Secret" which is a silicone coating on steel. That works for a while, longer if you are careful to wash it promptly. But without a vendor ...


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It is simply teflon. It can be colored in any color, but the lighter colors will darken with overheating, so it is convenient to coat a pan in an "overheated" color from the beginning. The manufacturer here chose to use a different color.


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I couldn't find an exact match but the short, squat shape with a straight top edge suggests that it's for stirring and/or scraping. The flat shape (ie. that although the head is angled at the top, the whole head isn't angled) and thick, inflexible design suggest that it isn't supposed to be used for flipping; this would be very difficult as rim of the pan ...


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There are devices sold for this purpose which use two concentric lids, like https://www.amazon.com/Boil-Over-Safeguard-Silicone-Spillovers/dp/B00BPYTPJC. Mind that some things will boil over even in a wide open pot, you would have to experiment whether such a device will help in these conditions.


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As stated in the linked question a little oil will help. A taller pot, lower the temperature, and monitor. With a noodle that you are going to drain more water will be less foam. But more water is more water to heat. For rice consider an electric rice cooker. Based on your comments about pressure you don't understand the mechanism. With or ...


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I am new to this "baking hobby using a bread maker". I have faced the same challenge, and at this very moment am experimenting to find the best "trick" to avoid having unsightly impressions created by the machine paddlers; therefore, I would like to share with you what I have "come to know" basically through experimenting, and some confirmed through readings:...


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The device which "releases the pressure automatically" is a normal pot. You don't put the lid fully on, you leave a small gap on the side. It is sufficient for practically all cooking. And yes, if it is still overflowing, you should reduce your temperature. Not only don't you win anything by cooking it at such a high flame that it boils over even with a ...


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From a not too great home cook:- I had both types of a very very cheap brand. Those multicoloured ones. The blue coloured Chef's knife and the green Santoku were most used. The cutting surface came to my naval level and the board was, again, a cheap bamboo piece. I used the rocking and crosscut motion, almost always. (It was possible with the Santoku, as ...


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Yes, I think that they strainer does make a difference. I would say that they are best for nearly any tea leaf is the fine wire mesh strainer. Plastic mesh is probably second best and the glass or plastic with a few holes as the least desirable. When brewing whole leaf tea, you want to make sure that the leaves have enough room to bloom and open. If the ...


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I use a silpat sheet (silicone with some sort of fiber reinforcement in it). As it's silicone on both sides, it grips the countertop well, but the bread dough doesn't stick to it too much. The only drawback is that you don't want to use metal tools with it, as you might damage the surface. (I avoid bench scrapers, and definitely no cutting on it) I don't ...


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Much of bread baking is not about surface but technique. A good surface is an asset but it's really convenience. When I am working with wet dough I don't even try to stop it sticking, I use the stickiness to stretch the dough. I find that I get very fast, good quality gluten development in about half the time as traditional kneading. I use a dough scraper to ...


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A vast array of surfaces exist but most people end up with either butcher block, stainless steel, or a natural stone such as marble. People choose stainless steel for its ease of cleaning and it's sanitary properties. People choose natural stone because it is typically colder (great for pastries), dough tends not to stick to it, and it looks great. People ...


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I have one of these woks, the interior is black enamel. I'm sure a lot of people will be aghast at this solution but it works a charm. I use Easy Off oven cleaner. Just spray it on and wait 1/2 hour or so, then use an old toothbrush to remove the buildup, and wash very well. It will not harm the enamel. I use it on the outside too, to remove the baked on ...


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I would first try cooking them longer. Raising the temp can also work, but you run the risk of burning whatever oil you are spraying onto the waffle iron, which can taste off (not a big risk) and will smoke up your home. Without knowing about your batter, I'd suggest adding more sugar in some form. That's often the culprit in homemade pancake/waffle batters,...



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