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1

Baking! I learned this on Good Eats and have used it to cook for a dozen people and it's as easy as working with a rice cooker. The recipe linked is for brown rice, but I've used it for sushi rice as well which would just call for different proportion of water and shorter cook time. Also, skip the butter, of course. The recipe also mentions a glass dish, ...


1

I've put regular ceramic bowls under my mixer before (also a Kenwood, but that doesn't really matter.) The only things you have to look out for are: Does the paddle scrape the bottom? If so, raise it up until it doesn't (paddle height is adjustable.) Does the paddle hit the sides as it rotates? If so, your bowl is not wide enough. Get a wider bowl. If ...


0

Go to Walgreen get Intestinal Lubricant Mineral Oil, this is food safe, it is the same stuff I believe sold in small bottles for $7-8 bucks for cutting boards, bamboo, etc, with a fancy name. You will get a lot more for less money at Walgreen as an intestinal lub. Yeah, it is a laxative. For seasoning cast iron. ...


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Just last night I used the small grating side for zesting a lemon; it worked out great just like I see on the Food Network. I don't yet own a microplane so the cheese grater was my only option. I'll definitely use it again until I purchase a microplane.


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I have the same problem years ago, I am a clumsy person and always cut my self whenever I work or cook in the kitchen. I avoided using knives for many year and just throw almost everything to the food processor. But everything changed when my friend send me this NoCry Cut Resistant Gloves last Christmas, and boy..everything changed after that. I am more ...


1

I tried MAPP gas and got a sooty residue. Not recommended. I have used propane, esp. when melting cheese, with great results.


2

It also helps you tell if your oven's actually working. If you're a good judge of temperature (or if you have an oven thermometer), you can also judge if the oven's keeping the correct temperature before you close it up and ignore it for a lengthy period of time. (from Pork shoulder put in broken oven for 10 hours, safe to eat?)


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A cast iron pan will do the trick. You probably have one (thus don't need to purchase and store another piece of metal). I will frequently forget to take something out of the freezer. So, when I do, I just place it in the pan (or turn the pan over to place on the flat bottom). Items in contact with the pan thaw significantly faster than items simply ...


1

As @Jolenealaska said it's a defrosting tray like a miracle thaw or the like. There's nothing magic about it, it's simply a piece of metal that has high thermal conductivity. Materials that have a high thermal conductivity transfer heat more efficiently than those with a low conductivity. Aluminum is cheap and has a high thermal conductivity relative to ...


8

reference: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/conductive-heat-transfer-d_428.html Let's take a moment to look at the heat transfer equation. Looking at it, we can see the ways to get more efficient heat transfer q / A = k dT / s q / A = heat transfer per unit area (W/m2) k = thermal conductivity (W/mK) dT = temperature difference (oC) s = wall thickness ...


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How nice to have a question I can just answer. I remember the ads for that thing. You can still buy it, it is called The Miracle Thaw. Now there are knock offs. I am so pleased that you didn't ask how. It's too close to my bedtime for that.


0

One very important point to remember if you buy a propane torch from a hardware store is to make sure you buy a "Regulated Nozzle". Otherwise when you tip down to bronze your food it will go off (extinguish).


2

If you can't get any pressure, it's something more than just the nozzle at the end of the tube ... it's something deeper in the mechanism (triggering the over-pressure release), or an issue with the gasket and threaded top. Try turning your sprayer over for a few seconds, then back right-side up and pump to pressurize the sprayer quickly about 2x more than ...


1

I bring my cast-iron to 500C regularly for steaks. I preheat the skillet in a 525F oven (as hot as it will go), then I put it on my hottest burner (electric coil stove) for 5 minutes. Checked with an IR thermometer, that does in fact get the pan to 500C. Once I answered the phone and let it go for longer than 5 minutes (8 maybe?). It made an audible poof and ...


2

If you want perfect crepes, iron is the way to go. You don't need the super high temperatures achievable by iron. In fact, if you get the temperature too high, your crepe will throw bubbles. But for perfect browning, you want the large thermal mass of the iron quickly baking the crepe. Teflon produces much paler crepes, and because you have to leave them ...


3

As long as you don't use metal tools with the teflon, I don't see why you shouldn't just go with that. Iron or steel would have to be very well seasoned (think cooking scrambled eggs). Besides, for $15 you aren't out a lot of money if it doesn't work out. Edited to add: Teflon is when Alton Brown went with in the crepes episode of Good Eats.


1

David Lebovitz tells us that chilling the tins prior to filling helps the cakes to develop a "humpy" appearance, particularly if baking powder is used (which some chefs say to NEVER use in Madeleines). Also, since the tins are usually prepared by brushing with melted butter mixed with flour, chilling would keep that where it belongs instead of it pooling in ...


3

They're just called corn holders, or corn skewers. I've never seen them holding watermelon before. As a matter of fact, they don't seem to me to be appropriate for watermelon. I don't see how they would make watermelon easier to eat and they're quite sharp. Especially for a kid, that seems kind of dangerous.


2

Draksia gave the best answer if you're going to be doing this a lot. If you're not, a few things that the average person is more likely to have, or can get relatively cheaply: To keep things cool: Find two vessels that nest inside of each other, with decent sides, fill the larger one with ice, then place the smaller one on top, with the food inside it. ...


3

Depending how many people you have over, and assuming the party is at your house, a lot of that is just fine at lukewarm rather than piping hot; you could stuff the pasta and chicken into an oven set to "Warm" or "200F" or whatever the lowest heat is, which keeps it dry and warm, and keep the desserts in the fridge, covered to prevent moisture. If you're ...


3

Standard answer is hotel pans and chaffing dishes with alcohol burners for the hot items. Double hotel pans with ice between them for the cold items. Coolers work well for storing items before serve. Things that are fried though would do much better in an oven set to the lowest temp, coolers will trap moisture and they will lose their crispness. Chafing ...


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This is a collection of identifications from existing answers. If you know what something is, please add it here, rather than adding yet another answer - and remember to explain how you use it! 1. An egg scissor. Lee Valley used to sell some as recently as this century. You hold it like scissors, open the blades, put the circle over the top of your ...



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