Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Just brought the beautiful book called Scandinavian Baking by Trine Hahnemann. In Scandinavia there are Sourdough Hotels!! I kid you not, where you can leave your 'biga' when you go on holiday. As Trine says..."that is committed sourdough baking..". This woman has taken her traditional bread and made a fabulously informative and practical book on Sourdough ...


1

I'm not a coffee drinker, however, I have ground and made my wife's morning coffee with a French press for almost 6 years. I purchased her a Capresso Stainless Steel Burr Grinder a few years ago. Love the grinder although using it produces a crazy amount of static electricity. A couple of years ago I start experimenting and found that a 12oz bag in our ...


1

I would like this one. The two ounce size would be just right for the juice of one lemon. There would be no need to wash the sprayer between lemons as long as you never used it for anything else. In the fridge it would preserve the juice as well as anything. Once and while spray some hot water through it and shake some soapy water in the bottle. Joe ...


2

I personally use squeeze bottles to store my citrus juices, including pre-strained lemon juice. They're nearly identical to these versions from Amazon (though more colorful) which I like because they have a built-in cap to keep the container sealed. There are a number of other styles sold, but know that most don't include caps. The small tips make them ...


0

I have a gold reusable coffee filter I place over the drain in the sink. I pour the leftover contents of the French press into the filter. Then rinse out the press, getting the remainder of the grinds. Dump contents of gold filter into compost pile or garbage. Rinse out gold filter. Easy peasy!


0

Mineral oil sold in a pharmacy is what you need. It is safe for human consumption (it's in the pharmacy because its a laxative) and does not go rancid.


2

I use mine for anything that needs to be kept fairly cool, but doesn't necessarily need to be "cut" the way the blade of a food processor does. Anything that requires mixing meat, in particular. Burgers, meatloaf, etc. retain a better texture when the meat isn't warmed by your hands. Aside from those, we mix ground meat for jerky and meatballs in the mixer. ...


0

While yes, it is easier to cook on a non-stick pan, I have a different solution. I use a seasoned carbon steel wok to cook my eggs and it is my favorite way (besides sous vide) due to the ability to keep the egg contained within the oil. As long as you put at least a Tablespoon of oil in the bottom of the wok, you can drop the eggs right into the center of ...


2

Another alternative is: Dig a hole the size of a dutch oven Fold a liner for the hole out of several layers of foil Remove the foil liner Put hot coals in the bottom of the hole Put the foil liner over the coals Add the food Cover the food with foil Add more coals on top if you need them The earth around the foil liner holds heat much like the dutch oven ...


0

offset the lid so the seal isn't spitting bubbles and fluid all over. If the bubbles still keep coming, offset it some more. If you have to remove the lid altogether or need to rest it 90Deg to what it's supposed to, then that's fine. It won't hurt anything. If the lid doesn't like staying offset, put a wooden spoon in the crock and then cover with the lid, ...


1

It's the nature of a slow cooker as far as I know. We usually put a rimmed baking sheet under the cooker if it's going to be on for an extended period of time to keep the water from ruining counters.


0

I know this is a very old thread... however just wanted to mention that most of the "pro" lines of Zwilling knives are 57 Rockwell and higher... you can check this site for more detailed information http://www.metrokitchen.com/zwilling-ja-henckels-knives-comparison-guide


1

For the most part, you don't need to adjust your recipe.** For breads that you typically have to knead for a very long time, however, I sometimes need to add a bit more flour. I assume this is to compensate for the lack of bench flour getting worked in while kneading. I also have to watch it fairly closely, as I've had too many times when the dough starts ...


1

Dave Arnold's Searzall was invented specifically for use with sous vide cooking, and for the purpose of eliminating "torch taste." I have one and use it frequently. Having said that, depending on the cut of meat, sometimes the best tool for the job is a blistering hot cast iron pan. In the picture below, I am finishing a sous vide burger with the ...


0

What about shellac for a cutting board finish


4

Most basic mills with steel grinders will be OK What breaks them are Overly aggressive grinding; just grind gently and your mill will last much longer Keep them dry; do not use a pepper grinder over a steaming pot. Grind pepper into a bowl or plate, and then pour into pot Old peppercorns; as they age and dry, they get tougher to grind, and wear most mills ...


0

I realise that this doesn't directly answer your question, but perhaps you could also consider using a mortar and pestle? While this may be less convenient, they're much harder to break than any pepper mill.


0

Americas Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has thoroughly tested pepper mills. If you can come up $5, you can get the winner from Amazon. The big winner winner is: The Amazon page is here The highest rated mill under $35 is this one: That Amazon page is here.


1

In my experience, the best cheesecake is made in a glass pyrex pan, 9 or 10 inches, if you can find it or most likely have it or your mom or grandma or aunt. Bake it on 300 degrees, making your own graham cracker crust with unsalted butter, vanilla, and sugar, using 16 to 24 ounces cream cheese, 2 to 3 eggs, one half to three quarter cups sugar, real ...


1

If you push baking soda through a mesh screen it unclogs and cleans it really well too.


0

I agree with a lot of the previous answers, especially "try something else", but if you want to keep it Starbucks, I'll note a few things. (On the off chance it's something to do with Seattle, Caffe Vita has opened a shop in NYC. Mmmm, Theo blend.) First, I would buy direct from SB rather than from grocery stores. That stuff is more likely to sit around on ...


1

Is there a reason a large capacity food processor couldn't be used? Not sure about the type of chili and if you need the seeds to be removed. Either way, this should work fine, just pulse until finely pureed.


2

I assume you will be cooking the sauce. If this is the case, my recommendation is to cook the chillies first and puree them afterwards, as with traditional ljutenica or ajwar. In this case, you can either peel the skin off after charring it and then process the resulting soft flesh whichever way you want (it's very easy, leaves no chunks), or put them ...


1

I'd recommend using a food mill with the fine disc for this, personally. It will prevent the skin (if sufficiently tough) from making it through to the final result. After that, if it isn't fine enough (although I doubt that), you could always then blitz the result in a blender.


0

They're not always the same thing. You need a pressure regulated torch; the unregulated ones will shut off when tipped down, making them impossible to use on food.


0

My family has always had cats and always used cast iron skillets. We "dry" them by placing on a low flame stove burner and store them in the oven...gas oven that is.



Top 50 recent answers are included