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0

I've used a product called CopyFlex in the past to do just this. It's a food-grade silicon rubber that's normally used for mold making, but it coats the handles of cookware just fine if you "rough-up" the surface a bit. It's a bit of a process, but the results will be quite cheap(if you use the product for more than one use) and you can replace the rubber ...


-1

I've used heat shrink tubing on a couple of my pieces of cookware. It comes in unshrunk diameters up to at least 1.5" (38 mm). Put the stuff over your handle, hit it with a propane torch or oven burner, and the stuff shrinks to fit snuggly. For more insulation, you can add multiple layers of the stuff. It's available at the usual online outles.


4

While a cookie press would at least have the nominal excuse of being multi-purpose1, it's... awkward to use for icing/whipped cream. What you might have been thinking of is an icing syringe (aka piping syringe, cake decorator press, or various non-informative names like "Dessert Decorator Pro").     While a decorating bag is vastly more ...


9

The chaulk gun for kitchens is called cookie press and looks like this: I know that some use it to decorate cakes and with whipped cream, too (some come with decorating tips, some don't), but IMHO it's a wiser idea to learn how to handle a pastry bag - the results will be better with sufficient practise. But if you should have problems with your hands or ...


14

My suggestion would be to use a piping bag. You can get various tips so you can change up the swirls and lines as you like. Added by Jolenealaska: I hope you look at the comments and all of the answers here. I have used both pastry bags (many times), and a caulk-gun thing once before I threw it away. Disposable bags are not expensive unless you use a lot ...


2

There are a variety of heat resistant silicon accessories that will serve your purpose. Here a couple from Amazon.com* Duncan-2-Piece-Short-Handle-Holde JAZ Innovations Cool Touch Lid Handle Cover Not an endorsement of either Amazon or these products.


1

If you really like ice cream and you're prepared to spend the extra money and accept a larger machine then in my experience you'll get better and more reliable results with a machine that has its own compressor. I initially used an Andrew James machine without a compressor and top drive paddle and it only had enough freezing power for one 700 ml batch of ...


4

As the comments already cover, thou shalt not trifle with the sanitation department rules if you want to stay in the business. You might try tighter gloves or gloves of different (but still acceptable to the sanitation department) plastics/rubbers, or with different surface textures. Many "food service gloves" seem to the purchased on the one size fits none ...


1

The only "loaf pan with a lid" I'm familiar with is the "Pullman" pan. I have seen suggestions to use a board wrapped in foil or foil under a casserole dish set on top of a regular loaf pan if trying to emulate that form without the right pan. Foil alone would probably not hold. I don't own one and have never emulated it. I suppose if someone was using a ...


2

Two opposite things to try, depending on what the haze is (or what works.) Barkeepers Friend (mostly oxalic acid) or vinegar (acetic acid, not quite as strong as oxalic.) Baking soda and water paste (alkaline) or soak in hot water with baking soda. Actually, that brings a third to mind - mechanical - Bon-Ami - feldspar - abrasive but softer than glass ...


0

You would not have been able to open a fully charged ISI without some effort and a big mess, so I am going to assume that the gas never entered...or entered and released as you were shaking. Disassemble and fully clean your ISI...use the small brush that came with it to clean the nozzle. Check to see that all gaskets are present, particularly the large one ...


1

You have several possibilities to approximate sous vide cooking at home. Manually control a heater in a pot. Absolutely not recommended, needs constant babysitting and is never precise enough. But there are people who try it out as a step in the process of convincing themselves to spend the money. Beer cooler. Inexpensive (especially if you already have ...


2

You could probably do it on the cheap, but the temperature precision might suffer in the process: ($0-$3) A container for water that can handle being warmed up a bit. (recycle something or buy a 5 gallon bucket) (~$20) A small submersible garden pump. (I have no idea what temperature they're rated for, but I use one in my greenhouse hydroponics systems, ...


0

I have an electric oven.I heat my stone on the floor and the bottom is perfect in 5 minutes,I then transfer the pizza to the broiler to finish the top for about 2 minutes. With perfect results.


2

Dice the butter and use the paddle attachment, as sourd'oh recommended. The paddle will break up the butter some, but more importantly will 'squish' the pieces, making them thinner and flatter. That will layer the butter through your pastry, making it flaky. This is similar to the effect of coarsely grating the butter, but will create a good shape and mix ...


-3

Well I don't really know what that thing is called but I'm pretty sure it cuts the cheese way better then the other side


0

The higher RPM is better. Provided you can control that from the lowest RPM to its Highest. The kind of stuff you want to mix will determine the correct RPM to use. The torque is also important. This means for a layman point of view the strength of your motor. Example: You are to mix a thick dough, would your motor sustain the mixing at a given RPM? If ...


1

I like glass lids because you can see what's going on without having to "check" all the time. I like metal lids because they are more durable. Even the metal ring around glass lids seem to be more susceptible to bending and warping than a full metal lids.


2

I like my metal lid stockpot because it can go in the oven if I need it to. Glass lids can often go in the oven, but are sometimes limited to temps of 300-350. Many are 400, but you'd want to check. As for heat, metal is a better heat conductor than glass, per unit of thickness, but given that most metal lids are thinner than glass lids, I'm not sure what ...


4

They don't break if you drop it on the floor. That about covers the advantages of a metal lid here. The "heat kept in" is largely a matter of the steam condensing on the lid, and is pretty much exactly the same for metal or glass lids, or a sheet of tinfoil over the pot. If they are on, it is, if they are off, it's not.


0

I'm fairly sure that you should be able to get a "rebuild kit" with all the rubber parts (and perhaps a few others.) Due to the wonders of modern commerce, it's anybody's guess as to whether you might well be able to find a complete new siphon for less cost. If you have a second-hand store or frequent tag sales you can almost certainly find one barely used ...


3

Whelp - I know you all have been patiently awaiting the outcome of this puzzler. I ended up freezing the entire thing as suggested by @Stephie. This didn't quite work - the inner jar still wouldn't come out. So then I tried sticking the cold contraption inside of some warm water (off the boil for 10 minutes), which split the large outer jar in half. ...


5

It's basically dead. The insulative enamel surrounding the wires in the motor has become overheated. That is where the smoke is coming from. If you continue to use the unit the enamel will degrade completely resulting in an electrical short. It is actually a bit of a fire hazard, so I would suggest discontinuing use of the unit. It is possible that the unit ...


1

You could go with a lightweight tempered glass product like vitrelle (aka Corelle). They make bakeware that is lightweight like their dinner plates. You would get all the benefits of traditional glass, without the weight. The other thing you might be thinking of is the plastic carryout containers that are oven safe up to 400 degrees (or whatever its rated ...


3

The material you'd want is silicone. For example, there are silicone baking molds. They are often used in professional kitchen settings, but I'm sure you find find some online. Here's an example. There are probably other kinds of silicone containers that can handle oven well, and they can definitely handle microwave.


0

Just add raw salt to frozen simple ice in 20:80 ratio mix both and properly crush 20% of the ice into smaller pieces. Place all contents properly mixed into an metal container which can be sealed. As the ice will melt along with salt, gas will form and the metal touching the contents will give you minus 30 degree. You can use it as anti-griddle. All costs ...


0

Absolutely! Cast iron is the best. You can clean it with a sandblaster if you want to, and it heats very evenly. You also get a good workout by lifting the cookware. Lots of people buy cast iron, and then decide to go with cookware that is lighter and prettier, making used cookware extremely inexpensive.


0

When I finish cutting up a turkey I wipe the grease off with paper towels then wet it in hot water then sprinkle baking soda on it and scrub it clean. Rinse in hot water, dry then put cutting board wax or mineral oil on it. Dish soap absorbs into the wood so don't use.


0

Copper is highly conductive of heat. The flare on the top rim is to aid in pouring, so liquid does not drip down side if pan.


2

Conventional wisdom says use the dutch oven. Why? Because dutch ovens are heavy and have a lot of thermal mass. Higher thermal mass tends to even out the temperature experienced by the food inside of the cooking vessel. All ovens oscillate above and below the set temperature. That means an oven set to 250 may oscillate between 225 and 275 to maintain an ...


1

Nordic Ware has plates which are durable and safe in the oven to a temperature of 400F. You can purchase them on Walmart's Website or Amazon.


1

Previously I answered that a legitimate use for a utility knife might be when you can only afford one knife. In the same post I undermine my own answer showing how I found no historical evidence for this. I wonder if I wasn't more interested in venting frustration at having a poor knife than providing a good answer. Leaving aside my dubious attempt at an ...


1

The bust use of the utility knife that I have found (and I use it often) if for what it sounds like... Utilities. I use it for cutting wire, tape, opening up boxes, everything under the sun. Heck, I've even used it to cut a hole in my drywall for an electrical switch. I think its a great knife to own in a knife set because lets be honest, you know when you ...


12

Ok, first you had me wondering "How did he get the small jar inside?", but having kids I quickly realized this is a futile question. (For those w/o children, read Douglas Adams...) The standard procedure for detaching two jars / glasses that are stuck, would be putting ice cubes in the inner one and then placing the outer one in hot water. But you said you ...


1

I'm not a coffee drinker, however, I have ground and made my wife's morning coffee with a French press for almost 6 years. I purchased her a Capresso Stainless Steel Burr Grinder a few years ago. Love the grinder although using it produces a crazy amount of static electricity. A couple of years ago I start experimenting and found that a 12oz bag in our ...


1

I would like this one. The two ounce size would be just right for the juice of one lemon. There would be no need to wash the sprayer between lemons as long as you never used it for anything else. In the fridge it would preserve the juice as well as anything. Once and while spray some hot water through it and shake some soapy water in the bottle. Joe ...


2

I personally use squeeze bottles to store my citrus juices, including pre-strained lemon juice. They're nearly identical to these versions from Amazon (though more colorful) which I like because they have a built-in cap to keep the container sealed. There are a number of other styles sold, but know that most don't include caps. The small tips make them ...



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