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14

No. Sweetened condensed milk has a 40% sugar content. It is very sweet, suitable for desserts and such. It is entirely too sweet to substituted into a curry. The consistency is drastically different. Evaporated milk is about the same consistency as heavy cream. Sweetened condensed milk, because of its high sugar content, is more the consistency of a warm ...


8

You may convert evaporated milk into condensed milk by adding sugar to it. For each cup of evaporated milk add about 1 and 1/4 cups of sugar. Pour the mixture in a pan, stir while heating on the stovetop until the sugar completely dissolves. Let cool. The heating of evaporated milk is similar to the treatment condensed milk undergoes, so the evaporated ...


7

Very easy. All you want to do is to remove the water through heating. As you are not going to can it, you don't have to sterilize it afterwards. The only concern when evaporating milk is to not end with a layer of scorched milk solids on the bottom. First, start with homogenized milk (you don't want to risk undissolved fat swimming on top of it). If you ...


6

Yes, you could certainly reconstitute evaporated milk by adding water. The outcome would give you similar but not identical results as fresh milk, due to the change in flavor the milk underwent while being cooked down to the evaporated state: it will retain the slightly cooked, caramelized flavor. This may or many not have a significant effect on a given ...


5

(not directly answering the question). As others have said, it's not a good substitution. If you had asked what I would replace it with, I'd personally use coconut milk, because that's what I have in my pantry, and I like how it works in curries. A closer substitution would be half-and-half or light cream, but they would just have a closer fat ratio as ...


4

You have to keep it in the fridge. This is generally true of any open can or jar. Once the seal is broken, you have to refrigerate as with any other non-conserved food. Personally, I also refill it in a glass container, because sometimes the oxidizing metal of the can gives food an off taste.


3

The two are similar, obviously the sugar in sweetened condensed milk is the big difference. They both start the same way, about 60% of the water is removed from milk by boiling at reduced pressure and temperature. Evaporated milk is then sterilized by heating it which gives it a caramel flavor. Sweetened condensed milk isn't sterilized the same way, ...


3

They are nearly identical, if you don't count the sweetened bit, it's around 40% sugar, while evaporated milk is just milk with around 60% of the water removed. You might be able to substitute it in that particular recipe, if you were planning on making it sweet, and use a bit less than the recipe calls for.


3

You're not going to be able to get cream from evaporated milk because it has been processed to either separate or homogenize the milk fats. As for using it in recipes, you frequently can use evaporated milk in place of cream. The concentration of milk protein mimics the extra fat of cream in some ways. In general, you should be able to sub it 1:1, but the ...


3

The primary difference between evaporated milk and a strong milk made from instant dried milk, aside from that great caramel-y taste, is the fat content. Most instant dried milk powders are fat-free. The fat in the evaporated milk is an important component in a lot of recipes. However, that can be overcome with the addition of some margarine with the milk ...


2

One question at a time! ;-) Making evaporated milk from powdered milk ("dry milk"): should be possible. Your suggestion is certainly reasonable, especially since powdered milk is basically just "really dry evaporated milk" but I've never tried it. Reading a bit on the above links describes subtle differences in the way that evaporated and powdered milk is ...


2

Even if you produce your own evaporated milk, it is highly unlikely to help you in separating the cream, because it is only reducing the water phase of milk; it doesn't change the fat phase. Nothing in this process makes the cream easier to separate from the water phase. You may be able to use the reduced product in some recipes where cream is called ...


2

Flan, a type of custard, is the same as crème caramel, tasty desert. Pumpkin pie uses a bunch of evaporated milk. Ducle de leche is a terrific desert topping and filling, translated literally it means 'sweet of milk'. The reason I mention this is that in Argentina and Chile, cans of sweetened condensed milk are boiled, unopened, on the stove for some ...


2

You can make your own sweetened condensed milk with the following instructions. In a sauce pan place 3/4 cup white sugar mixed with 1/2 cup water and 1 1/8 cups dry powdered milk. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring frequently, until thickened, about 20 minutes. You should get about 14oz from this. If you, instead, would like to convert evaporated milk to ...


1

It's going to be really, really sweet. If you don't like that, then no, you can't. If, however, you have my vicious sweet tooth, it can be a neat variant. I personally love to switch condensed milk for evaporated in a potato soup and add ham. The final soup is sweet enough to be a dessert, but still quite tasty. ....I now want to try it in a curry, ...


1

In Russia it is common - at least among the people I know there - to take cans of sweetened condensed milk (size of a "standard" can of corn") to camping or hiking trips. 3 liters of water are heated with the condensed milk and then used for drinking pure or with cocoa poweder or to cook oats with.



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