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8

i have a friend who has 8 ostriches, and he eats their eggs all the time. the taste is (apparently) different from a chicken's... richer somehow, but not different in a bad way. he has hard-boiled them, but as roux says, it takes a LONG time to do it. i think he boils them for an hour, but don't quote me on that one. his most regular method is to drill a ...


6

It is quite common to make meat loaf with milk-soaked cubes of bread, but I've never heard of tenderising meat with it. Having said that, some kind of fat is common for marinades (yoghurt for example), so it might work. I'd try it with full cream milk, not half-and-half. I think the reason for soaking liver in milk is to make the taste milder, as lamb, pork ...


5

There's a bit of trickery going on in the comparison of vinegar (acetic acid) to spirits of salt (hydrochloric acid). Your 5% (0.83 molar) vinegar has a pH of about 2.5. You need much less of the stronger acid, HCl, to reach that same pH (2.5); in fact only 0.003 molar, a factor of 277 less. Since you taste the anion (acetate or chloride), not the proton ...


5

I've seen it done with agar-agar on the Danish show "Spise med Price". They made spaghetti with lemon balm. They sucked the warm liquid with agar-agar in it up with a syringe, pushed the liquid into a thin plastic tube, which they lowered into ice water. Before they served it, they pushed the spaghetti out of the tube with the syringe. As for a flavor ...


4

Check out this PDF called 'Texture: A Hydrocolloid Recipe Collection'. It has some recipes for various types of spaghetti using agar and other hydrocolloids. Since agar tends to dissolve under heat, it also has a recipe to make noodles with methyl cellulose which gels when heated. They suggest using a syringe to make your strands of spaghetti. It may be ...


4

I use almond milk as a milk replacement, almost exclusively. I was about to say when I made pancakes with almond milk they turned out fine, when I realized I made Buttermilk pancakes instead of just regular pancakes. I compared recipes for normal and buttermilk and noted that there was far less milk called for in the Buttermilk recipe (makes sense). In ...


4

Look at similar recipes on the internet and tweak ingredients to match what you want. A lot of it is intuition from experience cooking and tasting a variety of dishes. Also, a willingness to experiment is important. You're not going the nail the recipe perfectly the first time. Knowing the cuisine of a restaurant and typical ingredients and techniques ...


3

Yes. I will show you. Here are my experiment results. I have this as my mill. It takes a long time to go from wheat to flour and I mean like hours maybe even days. I tried a 2 3/4 cup flour: 6 eggs: 5 tsp oil ratio and kneaded both batches for a good 10 minutes and rested 1 overnight and 1 for 30 minutes. I obviously got more than what is shown ...


3

I believe milk helps to absorb strong flavor from meat. It may also impart a pleasant flavor of its own, but I have not been able to discern this. I have never heard that it can tenderize meat, and cannot think of an explanation that would support this. I have used milk to soak organ meat before cooking (beef kidney).


2

I doubt that most blenders could handle raw potatoes, though a food processor probably could. The problem with your idea is that they'll be easier to cook before they're mashed, and easier to mash after they're cooked. I see no advantage and plenty of potential disadvantages.


2

Starch gelatinization. Not sure if it'll work, but it won't melt at high temperatures. Might be worth experimenting with.


2

I can't help with the gelling, but to make the strands, consider using (making?) a chitarra : it's a frame with parallel wires -- you lay a sheet of pasta on top, then use a rolling pin to force it onto the wires, cutting the pasta into strands. This would allow you to make sheets of gel, rather than trying to form each strand individually. Some quick ...


1

A combination of observation, experience, and methodical experimentation. Let's say you're at a restaurant and the spaghetti and meatballs blow you away. How can you replicate that recipe? One option is to ask the waiter to ask the chef. Often chefs are very flattered by this, and will be keen to share their recipe. But failing that: Observation Look ...


1

Write down everything you know about the recipe. Then google everything: the chef's name, the name of the dish, of the restaurant, the ingredients. It may be a recipe which is published somewhere. Or a traditional dish from somewhere. Or you may hit upon something which gave that chef the idea of the dish. Combine the results of your research with your ...


1

We have sensors (buds) on our tongues and noses to detect compounds, these sensors send signals to the brain that are interpreted as taste and smell. I include smell in this answer even though you are asking about taste because smell is a huge component in taste, which is demonstrated every time you get a cold. These sensors detect specific flavors in foods, ...


1

I just used this recipe from Silk and they turned out perfectly. (I am not affiliated with Silk, I was just looking for a substitution which is how I stumbled upon this site and your question) 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour 1-2 Tbsp sugar or honey 2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup Silk almondmilk, any flavor but ...


1

Have you considered using soy milk? I used soy milk for making my pancakes this year for the first time and they worked out great. I followed this recipe from Delia Smith -http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/basicpancakeswithsuga_66226 The just opted to use soy milk and used oil instead of butter. My partner couldn't notice any difference in taste compared to ...


1

I've never had Ostrich eggs but I've eaten many duck and goose eggs that my family raised when I was a child. Duck and Goose eggs are richer (large yolks) and slighly gamey in flavor - you may enjoy this or find it unpleasant depending on your tasts. I quite enjoyed them. Our birds were "free range" (they wandered in our back yard) and ate a lot of grass ...


1

I have cooked and eaten an ostrich egg once before and it was a mildly unpleasant experience. It definitely doesn't taste like a chicken egg - it has a denser texture (almost rubbery) and a stronger taste. Scrambling it and using it as part of a frittata in two very large 14 inch pans, I was still scratching my head as to what I should with the leftovers. ...



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