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14

Simple. The compounds that give mint its minty flavor are alcohol soluble, so with alcohol present you can "extract" them. There are other things use can use, propylene glycol is one. Basically you need a solvent that can also serve as a carrier for the flavor you want. Water doesn't work, most flavors are not water soluble. Many are oil soluble, but using ...


11

By using a dehuller machine. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hegzzj9Rzk or http://www.buhlergroup.com/global/en/products/dehuller-dgba.htm How does a dehuller work? I don't know, but it seems that Google does: The most popular decorticator for sunflower is proposed by the B├╝hler Cie. It consists in a rotating blade that propels the seeds by ...


10

Why Alcohol? Alcohol is used for extracts because the flavor compounds (plant oils) you are trying to extract do not easily dissolve in water. Alcohol (typically bourbon or vodka) will do the trick. Make sure you use +80 proof because it also acts as a preservative. Making Mint Extract To make an extract, tear up or coarsely chop and bruise washed mint ...


9

There are two main reasons: Some flavors are soluble in alcohol, but not in water Alcohol is a preservative, helping make the extract shelf stable


9

One of the first things you'll need to consider is that the creme de cacao is already chocolate-flavored. Vodka is very clean and neutrally flavored, so if you use it to make an extract you'll get a very pure flavor extraction from whatever you're infusing. If you use something that's flavored already, the end result will obviously contain those flavors too. ...


6

Well, you are not going to get a maple flavour with anything other than maple extract (or maple sugar or syrup or some similar maple product). That said, I've substituted rum for maple in some recipes and tend to think of it as a better approximation than vanilla. The caveat of course is the amount; a tablespoon is fine to substitute, an entire cup is ...


6

Empty the water from inside the coconut, as this is not the milk you want. Crack open your coconut and scrape out the meat. In a blender, take about half your meat and roughly 1 1/2 cups of hot water (more or less depending on your desired thickness), and process. Repeat step 3 with the other half of the meat. Place a few layers of cheesecloth over a bowl ...


5

Yes, many oils or lipids are dissolved in alcohol, whereas they cannot dissolve in water. This is why, for example, vanilla extract is based on alcohol. That would depend on the ratio of leaves to vodka, and how long you steeped. Probably no where near what commercial extracts are. It would be unlikely to be drinkable straight, since the flavor would ...


5

I've been making rum-based vanilla extract successfully at home for years. Here are my recommendations. Your basic ingredients are 80 proof rum, sugar and vanilla beans. At the recommended proportions, the rum and sugar are plenty effective preservatives. You can use either light or dark rum, but it should be a good "call" 80 proof rum and not a bargain ...


4

It appears that you made some type of lemon extract, as opposed to a lemon oil. Probably good, but not lemon oil. There are two ways I know of to infuse flavor into oil. Both involve starting with oil...either a neutral oil or an olive oil. First is to heat the oil with the desired flavor product, thus extracting the flavor into the oil. The other, does ...


4

Your flavors can be grouped in water soluble and oil soluble. Alcohol now is a mixture - some oil soluble flavors are also soluble in alcohol. These are phenylpropanoids, like Coumarin or all flavors that are themselves based on alcohol, like Hexanol. Alcohol is not a better extractor for flavors, just one with shared properties of water and oil, without ...


4

It's been a while since I did the research before writing the answer you quote, but based on my recollection (and what I know about the science) is that sugar is not required. Sugar is mostly used to maximize flavor extraction in some cases where a sugary final product is desired, as in traditional production of some liqueurs. But since extracts are not ...


3

I doubt you'll get much of a yield. You will probably even have a difficulty creating a hazelnut paste in the blender. Ideally, you would pulverize and then separate with a centrifuge, to extract the oil. Unfortunately, I don't think your options are the right tools for the job.


3

is there some other reason it is popular? Yes: Vanilla beans are expensive, and once you've extracted the seeds, the husk, which still contains good vanilla flavor, is often discarded. Putting the empty husk in sugar allows you to extract some vanilla flavor that might otherwise be wasted. I usually save my empty vanilla bean pods and use them for ...


3

While it is not possible to conclusively say something cannot be done—and perhaps someone will come along who can offer additional insight—I don't think it is practical to separate the protein from sweet whey powder at home. It is highly likely that the reason the concentrated protein is considerably more expensive per unit weight is because it ...


3

Orange blossom water is distilled from actual orange blossoms, and will have a subtle orange flavor, probably more delicate and complex than orange extract, at least on a per volume basis. Orange extract comes from the zest or colored part of the fruit, and is a very powerful flavoring with a strong orange presence, but no acidity. You will find that ...


3

I am assuming your couverture was real chocolate, since you haven't said. While I don't know the effect of alchohol on chocolate, small quantities of water can easily seize chocolate. It becomes a nasty, pasty, stiff mess. Typical 80 proof vodka would be 40% alcohol by volume, and so approximately 60% water, so your homemade extract would have had ...


3

Are you looking to retain the maple flavor, or simply for a flavor that will be complimentary to your cinnamon rolls? In many ways, you could use all sorts of extracts, but your cinnamon rolls will be a different flavor. Orange extract might be nice. Almond extract always provides a very delicate flavor (unless you use too much, then it's overpowering) ...


2

The pumpkin flavor you're likely looking for is nothing more than the spices that are added to pumpkin "stuff": cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, etc. If you attempt to do an extract to achieve "pumpkin essence", you will not be happy with the results. I have been a home brewer (beer, wine, mead, etc.) for 20+ years and have seen many attempts from various brewers ...


2

This is speculation, since I have never done it, and I don't think it is practical or more effective than just cooking with pumpkin puree for these applications. If I were to try this, I would: Roast pumpkin (just the flesh, not the seeds or peel) to develop the roasty flavors. You would roast it dryer than you would for pureeing, maybe to a leathery ...


2

I probably would not recommend eating a box of baking soda and chasing that with shots of vinegar. But aside from that silliness, I can't think of a single thing that is actual "food" that is unsafe mixed with another actual "food", assuming reasonable quantities. Certainly anything with alcohol can be dangerous in huge quantities, as can a lot of other ...


2

I am just now trying the whole "essential oil made at home" thing, so came across your post, and thought I would add a couple of things (even though your post is old): (1) try putting the remaining "oil" in the freezer to see if the natural oil that was extracted from the lemon rind will separate further from the rest of the liquid (be it vodka or water, or ...


2

If you're trying to make vanilla extract, I wouldn't use a flavored alcohol... Even if it's feasibly possible in the lower-alcohol liquor (which I'm not certain of), you won't have the flavor you need... you'll have chocolate vanilla and, considering how strong the flavor is in most Creme de Cacao, I'd be surprised if you noted a change in the flavor at all. ...


1

Usually extracts are used for flavoring foods, but in this case root beer extracts and concentrates both are for making root beer at home, so I would suspect that you could use concentrate in this case as long as you get the proportions right and use a non-sweetened concentrate. The products out there vary in concentration and sugar content, you'll probably ...


1

A blender is the wrong piece of equipment for this - you need a tool to apply pressure to the hazelnuts, not to mince them to bits. You need a screw press oil-expeller. Hand-cranked models similar to the one in this article start at $125 on Amazon, electronic models begin at just under $200, and then ramp up from there depending on capacity. Search for "nut ...


1

I think you're conflating syrups and extracts. Extracts are some flavoring oil plus alcohol. For example, Vanilla Extract: Vanilla extract is a solution containing the flavor compound vanillin as the primary ingredient. Pure vanilla extract is made by macerating and percolating vanilla beans in a solution of ethyl alcohol and water. In the United ...


1

From the Wiki on Acmella oleracea, I get Spilanthol as the major compound in Jambu, an extract of the plant used culinarily for exactly the sensation you describe.


1

I made a wonderful "licorice" syrup while doing experiments in making my own wheat free licorice. Not exactly precise instructions, but it worked for me. Licorice root (preferably peeled. It is a labour of love but does give a tastier result) smashed or chopped (grinding isn't so good for a syrup as its much harder to strain out the bits) Star anise,a ...


1

Licorice root can be simply simmered in water to make a basic licorice extract, but it's quite weak, and not very "zesty" Modern commercial licorice root extraction uses ethanol under pressure and heat, and a form of ultrasonic "distillation". None of this is very likely in the home kitchen :-( You could try using a water and ethanol solution (say basic ...


1

Mix your extract with sugar in half of the proportion as in your candy recipe and start from there. For instance, if your recipe calls for 1 tsp of vanilla extract and 2 cups of sugar, try 1/16 of a tsp of your extract mixed with 1/4 cup of sugar. Add extract by 1/16 tsp until you get the flavor you want. If you like the flavor after you've added 1/16 of a ...



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