Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

52

Fundamentally, the reason for this substitution is that applesauce contains pectin. In baking, the role of oil is to coat the flour, preventing it from combining with the water (or other wet ingredients) and developing gluten. Gluten is what causes dough to rise, and also gives elasticity to the final product - what most people think of as "chewiness." ...


28

"Commonly used" depends mostly on the culture, I'd assume. There's a lot of different oils, so I've organized by use rather than try for a complete list. Some of the ones that you might find in a "typical American" foodie's kitchen include: For frying: something with a high smoke point : peanut, sunflower, soy, extra light olive oil For baking (muffins ...


18

Butter and cooking oil are not interchangeable in every recipe. Butter actually has water in it, while oil is a pure lipid. This can cause problems with water-sensitive preparations, for example a choux paste (where the proper ratio of water to flour is extremely important) or anything using melted chocolate (where the water in butter can cause it to ...


17

Oil is dry heat because oil contains no water. Wine does. The "moist" in moist heat really means water. In moist heat cooking, water acts as a solvent and actually dissolves much of the solid matter in the food - hence the reason why steaming and boiling tend to make food rather soft or even soggy. Oil, on the other hand, is very rarely a solvent. There ...


14

Deglazing removes caramelized bits (the "browned" bits) from the bottom of your pan or skillet after cooking meats or vegetables. It is usually accomplished by putting stock, sauce, wine, or even water (or really any liquid) in the pan over heat after the pan has been emptied of whatever was cooked into it and any rendered fat and scraping the browned bits ...


14

The simple answer is no, you cannot convert monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fats into saturated fats through cooking alone. Before I can even begin to answer in detail, I have to start by pointing out that "saturated" and "unsaturated" fat is already an oversimplification. These are very rough classifications of fats and the chemical reality is far more ...


13

There are a great many oils and fats on the market, which you choose to use will largely depend on several factors: Type of cuisine being prepared Health considerations Flavour profile required The most common oils are probably Olive oil - This is a great oil for preparing a whole variety of foods, it's also great in salads. It typically comes in four ...


13

Margarine has less fat than butter, but it doesn't give quite the same flavor as butter does. You also have to be careful what KIND of margarine you are using. Tub margarine has a higher water content and can ruin your baked goods and the stick margarine can have a lot of trans fats in it. If you really want to get detailed into the differences, check out ...


12

I think it's more about technique than what fat you use when you're looking for crispy outsides (I'm sure there is at least one question here already that has the technique answers). About the only solid advice I would give is that you need to find a fat that tastes good to you, or is neutral if that's your preference, and make sure the one you use won't ...


11

I have always found a glass bowl and a metal colander works best. I pour it in the sink to handle any splashes that occur.


11

There's too many factors to have a set percentage of oil that will stay, but lets cover a few common things that determine the oil in your final product. Heat of the oil: Your oil needs to be plenty hot enough to actually fry in. For fries, you'll typically want to shoot for between 350-375 F. If you don't have a thermometer, then get one! If you ...


11

Well, all I can say is 'it depends on the dish'. If the dish calls for fat to be added otherwise, you can keep that fat and count it where you would add some later. If the dish is just adding hamburger and no more fat - I agree, discard it. That said - I don't find hamburger fat particularly flavorful and nearly always strain it and add another kind of ...


10

To answer what I think is the question (you put all of the grease into a container and there's a residue at the top), bacon drippings are not 100% fat. There are also solid pieces of bacon in there and other "impurities" from the curing process. When rendering bacon fat, you should line the container with a paper towel first. Pour the bacon drippings onto ...


10

The purpose of using a roux, as opposed to just plain flour, is to improve the dispersal of starch molecules in the sauce. If you just toss a bunch of flour into a simmering sauce - or do the reverse, pour hot liquid onto dry flour - then you'll immediately start getting gross glutinous lumps and will find it nearly impossible to smooth them out. Starch is ...


9

If you want to be really lazy about it, just get yourself a fat separator. Pour in the soup, the fat will rise to the top, and you can do what you want with it (i.e. dump it). If you're reading this in an emergency, you can do this with just a strainer. You'll get better results if you chill the strainer before each skim, i.e. by rinsing it with very cold ...


8

Deglazing is a technique for making sauces and gravies. It occurs after you've accumulated cooked on meats and other deposits. First remove your meat and any excess liquid fat. Second crank the heat up high and get your pan nice and hot. Next add a cool liquid (water/wine/stock). The liquid will boil rapidly and lift the browned deposits to create a ...


8

The best way I've found to get rid of the fat that renders out of beef while browning is using a paper towel. Tilt the pan (using biger makes this easier) a little to one side while holding the beef against the other with a wooden spoon, this should make most of the grease pool on the tilted side. Lower the pan till almost flat, the beef should stay to it's ...


8

Generally it's things that have been prepared such that there's some sort of added preservative -- salt, sulfates, sulfides, nitrates, etc. So this would include all hams except 'fresh ham', almost all deli meats, all sausages, bacon, jerky, corned beef, etc. So yes, sausage is considered a processed meat. If you want to get all technical about what ...


8

The big difference is that oil can get to a higher temperature than water can. Water turns to steam at 212F, while most oils won't start smoking until 300-400F. Caramelization doesn't happen until 320F (for sucrose and glucose, 230F for fructose), while browning (the Maillard reaction, to be specific) doesn't happen until 375F. Now when you "saute" like ...


8

Yes, it is really chicken fat rendered during the stock making process. Called schmaltz in Yiddish, it is an ingredient in its own right. For example, you can use it to fry foods, or instead of butter in creating a roux, when you would like the chickeny flavor it provides. It is a key ingredient in matzo balls, and similarly, makes spectacularly good ...


7

Rendered beef fat can be used in a lot of ways. You can use it in place of oil in a lot of recipes, but finding out which ones you like will take some experimenting. Around our house, I use rendered fat from beef or bacon in place of oil when sautéing, for example with onions and peppers, garlic or mushrooms. I've also used it to add some kick to gravies. ...


7

The slow cooking give confit meat its texture and the storage time allows further reactions and dissolutions to take place. The traditional reason solid fats have been used for a confit is for preservation: once the fat cools it "seals" the meat. Today we can refrigerate, so many restaurants now make their confit with liquid oils. Myhrvold has demonstrated ...


7

To store fats, you should always use glass as plastics react to fats by absorbing some and perhaps discoloring or transferring flavors to your fat. Depending on use, I prefer to work with cold fat at the start as it has a much broader possible use and I don't like to wait when I make biscuits, so I keep mine in the fridge. However, you gain very little ...


7

Judging from those Wikipedia articles: Clarified butter is rendered butter, which means that the solids are removed. Beurre noisette is browned butter, which contains the solids. Ghee is slightly-browned (it should have a golden color) butter that is rendered. So you melt the butter till it's golden. Then you remove the solids by pouring the top layer into ...


7

I was doing some product demonstrations at an Asian market in Portland once, and an Indian vendor treated me to some of his samples brushed with a brownish ghee. I mentioned that I had never seen this kind of ghee before; I was used to a more yellowish, clarified-butter style. He told me "Yeah, my wife hates it when I make this kind of ghee, but I prefer it ...


7

moved here from a comment: Ghee does have a different aroma and consistency, so, depending on the use of it in the recipe (wether it is used for frying or in the frosting for example), it will quite likely change the final result. So in some cases substituting butter with some neutral flavored oil or margarine might be better than ghee. Which, I know, ...


6

Peanut or sunflower oil: high smoking point, good for frying Clarified butter: similar to above but more flavor Olive oil: a lot of taste, extra-virgin oil burns quickly Butter: low smoking point, I usually use it for sauteing at low heat, e.g. garlic


6

I use a baster and have never had a problem with the top part getting too hot, perhaps you could consider getting a bigger one so that the fat doesn't get near the top? Another option to consider is putting a lid on the pan and tilting it, over a suitable receptacle, then cracking the lid open slightly to allow the fat to drain out without releasing any of ...


6

I cut the top of a soda can off, use a grease screen over the beef and drain it into the can. Let it sit and it will harden so you can throw it away. Grease in the sink is very bad for your pipes.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible