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17

This recipe is listed under the section for fermentation, together with beer, wine and mead. The section starts with the sentence "Wine, beer and traditional sodas all depend on yeast to ferment sugar into alcohol and generate carbonation". I don't know enough about the history of soda to know if early sodas were alcoholic. Or rather, I am quite sure that ...


15

Yes, those spots are normal, they form as the nattou ages. They are amino acid crystals, and they are perfectly safe. Here's a picture. They're a bit crunchy, which you may or may not like. If you don't like the dots, get young nattou and consume it before the crystals form. If you do like them, get more mature nattou. With younger nattou, you should be ...


12

Ok, first you had me wondering "How did he get the small jar inside?", but having kids I quickly realized this is a futile question. (For those w/o children, read Douglas Adams...) The standard procedure for detaching two jars / glasses that are stuck, would be putting ice cubes in the inner one and then placing the outer one in hot water. But you said you ...


11

Korean chilli is a little different as it has a slight smoky flavour, in addition to being slightly sweet and also quite hot. The actual name of the chilli use in kimchi and for that matter, most Korean dishes is gochugaru (고추가루). It comes in a variety of preparations, typically, finely ground, flakes and a paste. You should be able to find this in most ...


11

Well, having grown up near "the" Sauerkraut region in Germany - I'd say don't. Honstly, I hadn't ever thought about why until today (can't have been only lazyness that my ancestors left the kraut in peace until done.), but: Why making really sure to create a water-seal when you are breaking it with stirring? The kraut is supposed to ferment under the ...


9

You can absolutely make your own black garlic. All that is required is to have the garlic in a vaguely air-tight container (preferably individual wrapped or contained) for 30 days at 140°-155°F. My method, covered at my blog, is to put the garlic in mason jars in my light bulb heated black garlic oven, which can be made for about $30 and can ferment 12 ...


9

This is not yogurt per definition, you are making a fresh cheese. You can actually use other types of milk for such a cheese, but the mouthfeel and taste will be very different and won't be as similar to yogurt. There is a large class of acid-curdled cheeses, including paneer, tvorog, quark and many others. I don't know if yours has a specific name. I know ...


9

You might want to try a desem starter. Have a look at the desem primer, which is also linked on the Wikipedia page. Starter instructions are given toward the end. Common lore says that desem starter should never get above 65F, which sounds perfect for your situation. (It's actually fine if it gets warmer than that, though.) Traditional conditions for ...


8

Mix it into new batches of artisan bread. It will give you some awesome flavor. I doubt that sealed in the fridge it was able to pick up any interesting bacteria that would make it a sourdough starter but it would still be a more adventerous flavor than a young dough. You could try making bread with just this dough but I would be afraid of it being too ...


8

A cold/delayed ferment does several things: Allows for more complete hydration of the starches, and more gluten development. An enzyme called protease, which is naturally occurring the flour, breaks some of the long gluten bonds, making the dough more extensible. (This is not in conflict with the first reaction, it just controls the gluten length). Creates ...


8

Per NC State's Extension's article on pickles and sauerkraut (some emphasis added): Pickles or sauerkraut mold during fermentation. Answer: Unsafe—microorganisms are growing improperly. Possible reasons Fermentation temperature was above 75°F. Too much salt was used, not allowing adequate lactic acid production. The ...


7

If your jars aren't in the refrigerator already, I highly recommend unscrewing the lids as soon as possible...unless you want to be able to share stories about how you found glass shards and the smell of kimchi everywhere in your kitchen one day. Depending on when you mean to eat them, I'd recommend a mix of room temperature ripening and fridge storage. ...


7

Vodka by definition is a flavorless distilled alcohol, retaining any of the organoleptic properties of the grain or potato could be considered as ruining the end product. Potatoes are a good source of starch, but brewers yeast has a limited ability to break down starch into usable fuel; its preferred fuel sources are relatively simple sugars like mono and ...


7

SUMMARY: Glass containers are perfectly fine for fermentation. It's usually other design aspects of the container that create fermentation problems. Do you have any sources that actually say glass isn't a good container for fermentation? I've never heard or read that anywhere. The only negative thing I can say about glass is that it's usually ...


6

I'm including links to specific recipes here, but not all of these recipes give fermenting instructions. I'm sure you could do these fermented though - as opposed to using whatever other pickling method is given. Pickled watermelon rinds are fun - spiced w/ clove, ginger, lemon, and cinnamon. Blueberries can be pickled - try with allspice, cinnamon, and ...


6

This is actually a great chemistry question! First off, you need the density and molecular weight of the acetic acid (1.039 g/mL, 60.05 g/mol) and alcohol (which is ethanol — 0.709 g/mL, 46.07 g/mol). Assuming 100% conversion of ethanol (y) to acetic acid (x), you will end up with the same number of moles of acetic acid as the amount of ethanol you started ...


6

Exposing the sauerkraut to air is undesirable: we want an oxygen-free environment for the bacteria to do their work, and air exposure also brings increased (though small) likelihood of surface contamination (by mold for example). I don't have a reference but I'm pretty sure that historically opening a crock to stir was not a thing. And regarding your ...


5

Less complicated than the other method, but similar steps at the beginning. I have used two methods and both worked. I have heard success stories for grains in the freezer for over a year. No milk powder involved. Wash the grains in both cases. Methods: Put in fresh milk (the same you used before to make the kefir) and then freeze in a plastic ...


5

As a chef who has studied black garlic for several years, including visiting China and a manufacturer in Austin to see how large factories make it...the answer is yes you can make it, but it will be nothing like true fine black garlic in any way. Which is why even chefs in restaurants, such as myself, order their black garlic rather than making it. It's ...


4

Many fruits start to ferment a bit, some even while still on the trees. For example orange juice normally contains a small amount (normally < 0.1 % vol.) of alcohol too. And some berries that grow in the dunes here in Belgium can make the birds who eat them tipsy when they are ripe (the birds fly a bit erratic during that season...). The "smell" might ...


4

Add 1 cup of urad dal to 3 cups of rice, few fenugreek seeds and 1/4 cup flattened rice ( or "poha"). Soak the ingredients separately for at least 4 hrs. Grind it and let the batter stay out overnight. Grinding dal separately will make it fluffy. Use the soaking water to grind the rice and dal for proper fermentation. Add about 1/2 teaspoon of salt for ...


4

Correct proportion of rice and urad dal is very important for proper fermenting along with some other factors. what proportions are you using? And up to how much time you are allowing it to ferment? In cold places, fermentation is a big problem. Sometimes it may take more than 15 hrs!!!! I have experienced it personally. Try making the batter as smooth as ...


4

Masi, Given that I'm a severe allergy and migraine sufferer, I was surprised by your assertion that canned foods in general contain large amounts of histamine. As far as I can find from internet search, they do not. The canned/jarred foods which specifically have been measured to contain histamine are: canned fish, especially tuna canned tomatoes ...


4

[not a definitive answer] Making good hummus is non-trivial. I think roasting sesame seeds is as volatile as roasting coffee beans with a few seconds or degrees changing the flavour drastically. It's quite possible the tangy flavour comes from the way they process their sesame seeds. I've had Israeli hummus (from Jerusalem) and it tasted very different ...


4

The recipe's goal is to use the natural bacteria in the beets and beet peels to cause the fermentation. The thing about using natural bacteria is that you never know what these are going to be, so it's a crapshoot what flavors you are going to get. Beets produced in one farm may have radically different bacteria in them, different varieties grown in the same ...


4

Unless you've got the time and resources to set up your own biology lab, you're not likely to have much luck raising your own bacterial cultures from scratch. You'd probably need growth mediums suited to particular strains of bacteria and strict isolation between them to prevent other opportunistic bugs from taking over. If you really, really want to try, ...


4

Fermenting vegetables is a pretty safe procedure, in fact, if done properly, fermented veggies are probably safer than raw. Really, little can go wrong if handled properly. The process is literally thousands of years old. In fact, your biggest concern is contamination after the process is complete. Of course you need to use safe food handling procedures ...


4

Correct me if I'm wrong, but to my eye it looks like there is a tiny gap between the two containers so the surface of the fermenting liquid is slightly exposed to air. Is that correct? If so, you have an "open crock" apparatus where the surface is exposed to air. While "open crock" is a very traditional method (and Alton Brown seems unconcerned), as I ...


3

I found some pointers here: http://www.indiacurry.com/south/batterexplained.htm (The following is just taken from the information in that link, I do not actually know anything about dosa) It seems that the lack of fermentation could be due to a number of things: Overwashing the ingredients (removes the wild yeast). Using chlorinated water (kills the ...


3

Well, the only thing I can offer as an answer at this point would be to use a hydrometer. Measure the specific density before and after. You could then be able to tell how much in sugars you have left. I can't really think of any good way to tell what bacteria and yeasts will remain in your strained water kefir. I know there has to be some since it will ...



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