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67

It's caused by the high amount of potassium in the banana. Microwaves react with metals, bouncing off and cause arcing. You can even create a cool light show by putting a raw peeled banana in the microwave. Don't worry, it won't explode, but it will make a mess, it's also harmless. This can also happen in some frozen vegetables depending on the soil ...


14

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


14

The key is mostly to cook over coals rather than open flame if you want decent control. This is a principle you find all over slow smoking/BBQ. You start the fire with plenty of wood and let it burn down to a pile of red coals, which you then can cook over with nice control. Personally, when I want to cook over an open fire, I treat the fire pit as 2 zones: ...


14

This may also be related to the dielectric antenna effects that cause grapes to spark in a microwave : I found that single grapes would eject steam out of the stem hole forming little rocket engines which often propelled the grapes about the oven. If the stem was left in the grape, so that the steam could not escape, the grape skin would quickly rupture ...


13

That's exactly what they are designed for! In general their electrical construction, and possible failure modes fully support being left on unattended They should pose no more fire risk than any other electrical kitchen device being left on at the wall e.g. an automatic toaster or kettle Some slow cookers have automatic fuses that blow if the pot runs ...


13

Fire is typically a poor heat source for direct cooking. It fluctuates with every breeze so the heating is very erratic. It also produces a lot of soot which tastes terrible and is bad for you. When cooking on a campfire much better results are had by cooking next to the coals than above the flame. Cooking with a gas flame is more reliable of course. A ...


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that ...


11

In Spain, the traditional way is using something like this: Or a pan with holes. The big day to do it is called Magosto and it's celebrated on 11/11, but it varies from town to town. It's one of the closest things to a barbecue, you first roast chorizos, then you roast chestnuts. If you don't have access to those tools, your best option is to put them ...


10

As long as you have a dutch oven and are planning on using it, look for camping recipes for dutch ovens. Usually when camping the suggestion is to put a certain number of coals under the dutch oven and a certain number on top to basically simulate oven-like conditions. You can make warm breakfasts and warm dinners this way. You can even bake bread and ...


7

Flambe is a valid cooking method. It allows you to flash off most of the alchohol from your chosen liqour but keep the flavour. I'd suggest that you have a wet towel at hand or a fire blanket in your kitchen if you're going to embark on this cooking technique as a first timer. Also don't run your extractor fan above the cooker if you're using your hob. ...


5

You have two delicious choices. Both require a bed of coals, so I'll start with that. You'll need to build a fire with the logs stacked 'log cabin' style, and let the fire burn down to coals. You want a deep red coal, just starting to darken on top. The coals should look something like this. You can bake, or bbq the chicken and asparagus. Both are ...


5

The best BBQ's are wood fired, you get real wood smoke flavour. Anything else is just a just outside hotplate/grill, and might as well be electric Using charcoal is easy and safe. A simple hack is to use some small pieces of strong smoke flavour generating wood on top of your charcoal when you are actually cooking Smoke is all part of the BBQ experience, ...


5

Assuming you have access to a food dehydrator or an oven that can be trusted at a low setting, you would be better off pre-cooking and then drying the cooked beans. When you get to camp, just add boiling water and wait 15 minutes, and they'll be done. This would save you the fuel cost of the long cook-time that most beans require, and allow you to season ...


4

There are two tricks that I know of: Stuff the chocolate in the middle of the marshmallow. More time in the fire will help it get melty. Roast your marshmallow long and slow so it's hot all the way through. It should practically fall off the stick. The hotter the marshmallow is, the more heat it can transfer to your chocolate. Let the whole s'more sit ...


4

The most important thing is to cook over open coals not over open flame. You'll get more even heat and no sooty smoke. Just build up a fire with some good-size pieces of wood and let it burn down so the flames are gone and you're left with a nice set of red-hot coals. Then start cooking. At this point, theoretically, it's just like cooking over charcoal ...


4

Not sure how much equipment you're hauling, but my advice is to employ aluminum-foil generously. Once you get a nice sear on your meat or kebobs, cooking over direct flame will only dry-out the meat. Wrapping food in foil helps evenly distribute heat, and it keeps moisture and juices inside the pouch. I particularly like sausage , onions and peppers done ...


4

There are so many variables here, I can't address them all. Whether are not you are hiking or driving to the camping spot, whether you can bring frozen/refrigerated ingredients in a cooler, whether you have permission to modify the camp fire area, etc. If you are hiking a fair distance, you will need to stick to safe-at-room-temperature ingredients, use ...


3

In addition to what everyone else has said: Roast root vegetables are a really good idea. Squash, parsnip and sweet potatoes are usually nice. Wrap them in a layer of tinfoil and put them in some hot coals and leave for an hour or two. If you cut them open first you can put in things like butter, honey, dried fruit and so on, but they will sometime start ...


3

Another great idea I've done before when portaging (i.e., in the situation where you want to travel very light) is aluminum foil envelopes filled with a fish fillet and veggies (sugarsnap peas come to mind). Bring the fish fillets deep frozen, then they should stay frozen during the first day if you insulate them well enough from the sun (e.g. wrap them in ...


3

As long as the cooker is in good electrical shape and nothing is touching the outside of the unit, it shouldn't be a problem. We usually try recipes out on a weekend first so we know how long they'll take and that the food won't burn, but we often leave it running while we're at work for things we cook regularly.


3

Do you think you get as good a result There are lots of different techniques for preparing rice, and all are equally valid. They do lead to different results, but it is up to you do decide which one you prefer. There is not one "right" way we can recommend over the other. does frying the rice like this make much difference Yes, there is a noticeable ...


3

Regarding the use of pallets, the link below is to a site that gives good examples of why not to use them for any type of repurposed project due to unknown chemical treatment, e-coli contamination, mold, fungus and other nasty things that could leach from the wood. We use hardwood branches from known (chemical-free) sources for smoking meat. ...


3

I don't think it really matters exactly what happened. Unless you've left out something important, it's not working right, and you need to get it repaired. The best case is that it keeps burning your food, and the worst case is that you set your place on fire. If you want to confirm that it's doing something wrong, you could put a thermometer in it and turn ...


3

Boiling things is the easiest thing to cook on a fire. Easier even than marshmallows. The water buffers out the variations in temperature. If the temp drops too low for too long then the beans will take longer to cook but it won't hurt them. If the temperature is too high for too long you may have to add more water. I think your strategy will work. Keep in ...


2

You can just soak beans until they are ready to cook. Depending on the bean, it would have variable soak times; but many beans left in water will come to a nice toothsome texture of their own accord (bear in mind they will need to be either sprouted or cooked at the end). Assuming you have a watertight container for a serving of beans to store them while ...


2

I recommend Native Cree Bannock Bread. Cooked over a fire on a stick. It's incredible with a little jam or honey. It's not bad on a cooking stone either, but I personally prefer roasting on a stick. Putting it in the fire and the smoke is really adds to the flavor. Below is a recipe that is close to what I use. I don't like putting in raisins in, we add some ...


2

The general rule should be to keep it simple. Don't forget, if you're without power, you don't want something that is heavy in preparation and/or cleanup. I've always liked cooking in foil packs when using an open fire. It's simple, requires little to no babysitting, and cleanup is a snap. Form ground beef into a patty, add some cut up potatoes, onions, ...


2

One option to consider it to make "dirty steak". The basic idea is to burn the fire down to a bed of hot coals and then just put the steak right onto the burning coals. I have done this with a London Broil and it works out very nice. It sounds crazy but the steak really doesn't get dirty nor does it burn up like you might think. The lack of oxygen a ...


2

You can do just about anything on a campfire -- even some baking if you're willing to carry a dutch oven. The important rules to cooking over a grill or campfire it so be prepared to move whatever you're cooking to a lower heat part of the fire (this might require bringing fireplace gloves with you), and to not turn your back on it for too long unless it's ...


2

In a non toting-the-hardware-on-your-own-poor-back context, you can't beat cast iron. Dutch oven, skillet, and griddle. This will even allow you to cheat a little (but only a little!) on the coals not flames advice. With these tool you can do some serious cooking, limited only by your prep-space and ingredients on hand: you can even bake by putting a second ...



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