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I've had flare-ups when frying fatty sausages using a broiler or an electric grill in an oven in much the same way that you can get flare-ups on a barbecue. Oven fires can happen when fat builds up in an oven or broiler and hasn't been cleaned, it would be entirely plausible that someone could walk out of the room for a minute and come back to find their ...


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This is probably obvious. In hindsight it was a thoughtless move: When my wife and I first got married, I was broiling steaks in the oven. I thought I would prepare my own glaze. Bourbon glazes were all the rage at the time. I think you can see where this is going. To my defense, up until then I had never added alcohol to anything except for deglazing in ...


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Pizza disaster is a fairly common oven horror story. It involves placing a pizza directly on the oven rack, and then having it sag through the wires to burn on the bottom of the oven. Sadly, I'm not finding an easily uploadable image for this answer, but the result can be quite horrifying, and smoky.


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The scenario you specify isn't very likely to happen. The food in an oven has a very low temperature. A casserole or loaf of bread might get some surface charring after staying for too long in the oven, but it'll need at least half an hour above the normal time for somebody in the next room to notice the smell. And there won't be much smoke and certainly no ...


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By far the main way you make a smoking mess in your oven is by baking something in too small a vessel, so that it boils over and burns on the bottom of the oven. The actual food can be pretty much anything you want, as long as it has liquid. (Similarly, baking a cake in a springform pan that leaks around the bottom will tend to cause messes.) If you want ...


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Although oil can spontaneously combust if heated hot enough, the typical reason for grease fires is the following combination of events: the oil level is too high in the vessel wet ingredients cause the oil to violently bubble the bubbles go over the side of the vessel the spilled oil ignites from the burner below ... and when it happens, it's really not ...


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When you lift the lid on something that's been fryed in hot oil while the oil's still hot, any water that's cooked out of the oil and condensed on the lid has a chance to fall back into the oil. That can cause violent spattering. Usually being gentle in lifting is enough to prevent the problem.


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Note I answered this question assuming that the onions are in the oven, not on the stove. See the other answers for a frying pan on top of the stove. It is highly unlikely that you started an oil fire in the oven. The flash point of oil is close to 400 Celsius, domestic ovens don't go that high. And even if you had managed to heat the oven to 300 ...



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