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100

Surely the authors of the previous (sublime!) answers will throw the "Sure it works in practice, but does it work in theory!?" at me, but this great SE question and its answers still lured me into creating an answer backed up by empirical evidence. The Answer YES! It's certainly possible. At least one successful attempt has been logged (see below). The ...


97

Cooking in a dishwasher is related to some other non-orthodox places to cook, like on the manifold of a car on a road trip. Basically, you're aiming to put food in an environment that's somewhere between 160F (71C) and 300F (150C) already, for non-cooking reasons. That's strange, but not entirely nuts. The dishwasher is going to stay south of 212F (100C), ...


34

"Sushi grade" means that it is safe to prepare and eat raw. In order to do that, it must be frozen to kill any parasites. That means it either has to be: Frozen at -20° C (-4° F) for 7 days; or Frozen at -35° C (-31° F - "flash frozen") for 15 hours. There aren't any official regulations about the fish itself or its quality, and most sushi/sashimi ...


27

I would wrap it up in tinfoil with some herbs and spices and maybe some lemon and set it to the pots and pan setting and let it run. I would make sure to temp it before you eat it and make sure that it is fully cooked. Also, you might want to lay it on the top so the steam and water cook it rather than the heating element at the bottom. I would also ...


22

This is essentially a Sous Vide hack (like the beer cooler, which is only slightly less weird). This would probably work best with a newer dish washer that can use cooler wash cycles. A quick google shows some wash cycles down in the 125F to 135F range, which is a common temperature to sous vide salmon. I personally don't like salmon at this temperature and ...


20

Try mixing hoisin or miso into low-sodium soy sauce. From one of my favorite bloggers, Smitten Kitchen, "I often see low-sodium soy sauce suggested as an alternative but I’m not convinced it’s a fair swap. There’s something more caramelized and fermented in the fish sauce that you’d miss. If you feel like playing around, I might whisk some additional ...


20

This article indicates that it's probably gall bladder bile: The gall bladder [...] sometimes [...] breaks even when you are cleaning the fish very carefully and close to the skin. If the gall bladder is broken, the greenish yellow biliary fluid pours immediately out into the inside of the fish and starts to absorb into the meat. The meat becomes bitter. ...


19

As a rule of thumb for a whole fish, and not a fillet - the gills should be bright red the skin/scales should be bright and shiny like metal this fish shouldn't really smell of anything except 'watery' the flesh should rebound quickly when pressed the eyes should be bright and clear really fresh fish is also quite slimey to touch if it's straight out of ...


18

You should never eat freshwater fish in raw preparations. Freshwater fish are far more likely to have nasty parasites such as the lung fluke, that can only be killed by cooking. There is a slew of other nasty beasts that can be harmful if not killed. Unless you want to end up on an episode of Monsters Inside Me, stay away.


18

Oh yes. Different people use different categories, no one system is canon, but this bit from Cooking Light is helpful; I wouldn't hesitate to substitute within these categories. Dark and oil rich: anchovies, bluefin tuna, grey mullet, herring, mackerel (Atlantic, Boston, or King), Salmon, farmed or King (Chinook), sardines, skipjack tuna White, ...


17

That white stuff is albumen, the same protein that makes the white of chicken eggs. The albumen is part of the salmon's blood, which means that your fillet was fresh. A trick for dealing with it was developed by Bruno Goussault while collaborating with chef Michel Richard from Citronelle in DC: soak the salmon pieces in an ice cold brine. The article in ...


17

That is the gastrointestinal tract of the shrimp. It is commonly called a vein or sand vein. It is often removed, but this is not required since it is not harmful and is mostly tasteless. To devein a shrimp you would make a shallow cut from head to tail and then wipe or rinse out the vein under running water.


16

I discussed a similar subject in this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" fish? Raw fish isn't safe to eat if it's just been sitting around. However, the raw fish used in sushi/sashimi has been frozen (typically flash-frozen) in order to kill any parasites, making it as safe as any other food. Most distributors of sashimi also have their own methods ...


14

There are two safe ways to defrost, one more rapid than the other. First method is to defrost in the refrigerator. This keeps temperature below 40 degrees F, in the safe zone. This will, also, take a while. Second method is to defrost in the sink under cold running water. The water doesn't have to run rapidly, but it should change regularly. This will ...


13

There is no real definition of 'sushi grade' fish. It's purely a marketing term to imply a higher quality piece of fish. There are some actions that should be done for tuna (really for all fish, but especially for tuna) when they are caught, such as bleeding them immediately, destroying the neural canal, reducing the temperature of the fish immediately, ...


12

First of all, if you're seasoning tilapia, you'll want to add some oil to it, since tilapia has almost no fat. So, here's the steps: Drizzle oil over the tilapia (both sides). Sprinkle it lightly with the spice mixture, all over Let sit 10-15 minutes. Sprinkle with starch (e.g. flour) at this point if you're frying them. Optionally, you can also add ...


12

According to an article about Fugu at Maldova Welcome: Some people who’ve tried puffer dishes describe it as one of the most sublime flavors in the world. Others, apparently less enthusiastic, or simply more objective, describe fugu meat as a cross between crunchy and chewy, said by the Japanese to go “shiko-shiko” in one’s mouth when absolutely ...


11

Alaskan King, or Chinook, salmon is generally wild, generally caught in the Pacific Northwest, often but not exclusively in Alaska. Scottish salmon is generally farm-raised Atlantic salmon, and as far as that goes is essentially identical to farm-raised salmon from Chile or Norway. Price: hobodave's comment is correct that the price will vary based on ...


11

Welcome to the site Tomas. Sashimi is actually a Japanese delicacy. It's quite simple because it's just raw seafood, that has been sliced into bite-sized pieces. It is typically served with soy sauce and wasabi paste. Pickled ginger is also served as a palate cleanser between bites. There really isn't a "recipe" to speak of, you simply buy really fresh ...


11

I agree with yossarian, if I question it, I chuck it. Although in this case, the salmon probably will not harm you, it might just taste bad. Loss of moisture (freezer burn), taking on of flavours, etc. I wouldn't eat it because it wouldn't taste great. My father-in-law would eat it, because you don't throw out food (his rule). Bottom line, if it has ...


11

First, about the temperature. Your safest option is to use a gun ;) The correct temp for shallow frying is between 150 and 190 degrees celsius. So if you have an infrared "gun" (a thermometer which neasures the temp of the surface at which it is pointed), use it to determine the stove setting at which the temperature of the dry (not ptfe coated) pan ...


11

Salmon or Tuna will make a very strong flavoured stock and will have lots of oil that coat your tongue. Not what you're looking for if you want a light brightly flavoured fish sauce. In a traditional French kitchen you want generic stocks (fish/brown/chicken/veal) that are able to be used for a wide range of sauces/dishes so having a salmon stock around ...


10

You need a hot pan. Use either clarified butter or an oil that can withstand high temperatures without burning. The oil should be quite hot but not at smoking point otherwise the fish closest to the skin will be overcooked and the skin will be charred as well as crispy. The pan shouldn't be quite as hot when it comes time to cook the fish skin-up.


10

Kudos to your wife for giving it another shot! Let me start with what I feel is the most important part of my answer: find a good fish monger and make friends. If the supermarket is the best you can find, so be it, but learn the name of the person behind the counter, ask about the fish, be interested. Ask what's just in, ask what's fresh. If the fish is ...


10

It depends on the recipe. As Jefromi said, salmon does have a different flavor. Specifically it has flavor. Tilapia doesn't really have much flavor at all. More importantly, salmon has about three times as much fat as tilapia. Salmon holds together better than more fragile white fish. This makes grilling salmon much easier than other fish which fall ...


10

Sushi does not require fish, sushi is the style of rice preparation (rice, salt, a little rice vinegar, occasionally some kombu). So long as you have the correct preparation of rice, you technically have some form of sushi (you could just throw it in a bowl with some additions on top and have a type of sushi called chirashizushi). Second, there is no such ...


9

Vinegar, in general, has distinct acidic characteristics that will affect a recipe; it's often used for this reason. For instance, in marinades, the acid is used to break down muscle fiber and help flavor penetrate. In Cevice, the acid component is used to "cook" the fish. Additionally, the different types of vinegar have different flavor characteristics. ...


9

Ceviche is not exactly "cooked", but the acid causes the proteins to become denatured in a similar way. It may not kill all bacteria and parasites as effectively as cooking (with heat), so like sdg said, it's safest to use food that you would eat raw. "Sushi grade" can refer to the fat content of the fish (like the USDA grades for beef marbling) rather than ...


9

In addition to hobodaves fine answer, freshwater fish usually contains a lot more mercury and other very unhelathy substances caused by human pollution. Some doctors recommend you to only eat freshwater fish twice a month.



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