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6

You're wrong in your observation to begin with. There are tons of things with meat and seafood: Cajun food often combines sausage, chicken and seafood (e.g. gumbo and jambalaya) "Surf and turf" is a catchall term for red meat plus seafood in American-ish cuisine, and comes in all kinds of forms (each separately, one stuffed with the other, a burger with ...


4

In my experience cooking for small children I've found that just because they like a set of ingredients doesn't mean they will like them combined if the texture changes. I child who likes chicken and vegetables won't necessarily like chicken stew. A child who likes fish won't necessarily like a fishcake as the fishcake has a very different texture. That ...


2

It might take some experimenting but what we found was that you could cook them quite quickly so that the outside was crispy, holding them together, but the inside was much softer. Then they could be split open and the middle spooned out. This was using precooked fish I think. Cutting down on the breadcrumbs might also help, though you might then find them a ...


-1

Resting meat so that it will reabsorb its juices is a myth and results in cold meat. There is a big difference between resting meat, that is letting it cool, and holding meat in a warming oven, which should be avoided. There are many reasons why you should not rest meat: 1. it continues to cook, 2. it can get rubbery, 3. it does nothing for the juices unless ...


3

If you buy a fillet, you don't get the bones. Cooking fish (or any other meat) on the bone often gives better results, both in flavor and texture, than cooking it off the bone. I've found that especially true for whole fish, cooking it whole is much more forgiving that cooking boneless fillets. Alternatively, the bones can be used to make a fumet (fish ...


14

When you cut any food you expose the cut surface to oxygen, which causes chemical changes due to oxidation. You also expose the cut surface to microbes and organisms which break down food. Both of these will impact the quality of cut meat or fish, so yes a filet cut from a whole fish just before cooking would be fresher and better quality than one cut some ...


1

I have a little to share based on my experience as a restaurant owner, there are 5 ways to thaw the fish properly and safely. Place it in the refrigerator, this slows down the icy crystals inside the fish. Put it in a running water, cold preferably, to maintain the toughness of the meat. Cut the fish to desired size before cooking for a couple of minutes. ...


3

Sounds like hot pot. There are a zillion variations, with different kinds of broths and different things to cook in it, so I don't think there's any one recipe name you could search for to duplicate exactly what your friend had. It's possible that knowing the region he was in would allow some informed guesses from folks with some local knowledge (not me). ...


2

The only best option is complete thaw to get them in good shape and in one piece, but that is not an option for you. Next one up is the quick and sloppy method. But it will distroy the shape of the fish, hence the name. My tip: Wrap the pieces of fish in a cling film/kitchen foil individually next time before freezing. That will most certainly allow you to ...



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