New answers tagged

0

The fish needs to be as dry as possible before going into the pan. The flesh side could coated/dusted (potato starch, cornflour, wheat flour, polenta, oatmeal, etc) Heat a hot pan, add a cooking oil with a high smoking temperature (eg canola/rapeseed oil), and place fish skin side down and lightly press the flesh down if it curls up. Leave to fry until ...


0

Simply No. You could explore (hot or cold) smoking, even curing (eg gravadlax). The cooking challenge sounds more of a food safety challenge!


0

I agree this can be down to personal preference, but sea bass being regarded for it's soft fine silky flesh (when cooked). You may want to try cooking them skin side down until crispy, and flipping over onto the skin side until cooked. Generally when I pan fry sea bass fillets, it's on a high or medium high heat and once the the skin is golden brown I flip ...


1

Start with the fish being nearer to room temperature, rather than straight out of the fridge. Then get the skin as dry as possible, any water makes crisping hard. You can lightly press with a paper towel and/or a light dust with flour (cornflour, plain flour, potato starch, whatever you like). Next, to a hot pan add some cooking oil that has a high smoking ...


0

No, not much of a quality difference as you usually only want to eat fish within 1-2 days of it being caught. The main quality difference is the skill of the person filleting the fish. (IMO it's not that hard to get a grip in fish anatomy/filleting. There are two main types: Round and Flat fish) One consideration, if you eat the skin from the fillet and ...


0

I'd say it depends on the type of fish, and how you plan cooking it. I prefer scaling and cleaning the fish before freezing. This way I'm only storing what I will be eating and have no need to worry about additional smells and bacteria in the freezer and whilst defrosting.


0

Would resting fish change the its taste or texture in any noticeable way? No, in short. The only mention of 'resting' of any fish is from the Lophius genus (aka Monkfish, Angler fish). It is suggested to allow the monkfish to rest if you are going to slice it before serving to reduce the amount of liquid released. I would suggest to portion the fish ...


2

Yes you can steam fish from frozen, it makes the timing a bit harder to judge without experience (obviously a defrosted fish is easier to control the timing). Also there will be more moisture released from the fish which may be a problem depending what you are steaming the fish in.


0

Idk why people think it can't be done in a pot, but can only be done in a rice cooker. I mean how did they cook rice before the electronic rice cooker was invented? I'm sure they didn't have 6 and 8 range burners, anyways I digress. Depends on the size (mainly thickness) of the fish. Rice typically takes 20 minutes to cook/boil, then a 10-15 minute steam....


0

Yes! If you've cooked the fish just to the point where it "flakes easily with a fork", then you need to let it rest for a minute or two at room temperature to let it firm back up a bit. You don't want to have to eat it with a spoon!


0

Fish needn't be rested unless you are sure it is slightly undercooked, and then you should transfer the fish onto a warmed plate and cover with foil for a few minutes. Cooked meat is rested typically because it spikes in temperature.



Top 50 recent answers are included