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14

The final word! After a few hours of experimenting today, this is what I discovered: No "standard" alcohol burns hot enough to caramelize the sugar using a reasonable small amount (i.e. less than 1 tbsp). Since there's an open flame, it will probably eventually caramelize the sugar, but the amount of alcohol required to burn that long makes the ...


7

Flambe is a valid cooking method. It allows you to flash off most of the alchohol from your chosen liqour but keep the flavour. I'd suggest that you have a wet towel at hand or a fire blanket in your kitchen if you're going to embark on this cooking technique as a first timer. Also don't run your extractor fan above the cooker if you're using your hob. ...


7

For a substance to burn, it must first reach its ignition point. For it to keep burning, it must reach its fire point. The ignition point of a 40% ABV liquid such as brandy is 26ºC/79ºF, and the fire point is approximately 10ºC higher than that. What this means in practical terms is that you need to heat the alcohol a little first before you add it to the ...


4

I think it is completely possible to make this work. The key is going to be finding the right amount of sugar and alcohol to use. You'll want to determine this in advance, but I assume you don't want to make a bunch of creme brulee to practice on. So here's what you do. Make a bunch of cheap vanilla pudding and use that as a standin in your ramekins for the ...


4

Make sure you keep a fire extinguisher handy, and make sure that it works. It never ceases to amaze me, the number of people who don't have one in their kitchen.


3

Sounds like you may have used too much liquor, good or not. That flavor is going to dominate...and go up like a rocket. Flambe is about the effect, not the cooking. When I used to make Bananas Foster table side, all of the cooking, caramelization, everything is done before you torch it. You could serve it without the flambe and there would be very little ...


2

Yes, it matters. You can destroy the pan. Don't use a non-stick pan. The coating starts to decompose above 250 Celsius, and will probably fail completely if exposed to the temperatures of open fire. Also don't use aluminium. Its melting point is under 800 Celsius, while a flame gets into the 1500s. You probably won't have enough energy to warm the body ...


2

I have done this before and never had a problem. My crèmes are baked in a water bath then cooled all day (at least 6 hours). I then sift fine brown sugar over top, completely covering the crèmes, then broil them closely under broiler (watching constantly) until caramelized (only few minuets); then I top with a couple of teaspoons 180 proof rum and flame. ...


1

Short answer: you cannot reasonably make bananas flambee ahead. While it would be conceivably possible to prepare your caramel and cook the bananas through the day before, you would then need to refrigerate them over night. Reheating them would be tricky, and might even take more time than preparing them in the first place--and you would not want to serve ...


1

Some people do flambé in non-stick (teflon) pans. It is not recommended. If it goes perfectly, the pan doesn't actually get any hotter using it to flambé than it would for any other purpose and so there really isn't any good reason not to use non-stick. The thing is, everything doesn't always go perfectly. It wouldn't take a huge mishap to ruin your pan and ...


1

I can see I am WAY late here, but, I'd recommend simply using the torch on a really thin sugar coat in advance. Than, prior to serving, pour alcool on them and flambé. No one will notice/mind the fact that it's not the flambé that actually created the crust. I am French and work in a French restaurant and this is own we do it.


1

I had a crème brulee at a restaurant recently to which they set light to brulee it. "When questioned they said there was a culinary gel they used. which they mix with sugar. Once I can find a link to where it can be purchased I will attach a link



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