New answers tagged

1

Vanilla extract is essentially vanilla infused into alcohol. If you don't have any problem with storebought vanilla extract, I doubt you'd have much problem with homemade vanilla infused into alcohol (i.e. homemade vanilla extract) either. While people do sometimes describe real vanilla extract as "boozy", it's not so much about the alcohol as the vanilla ...


8

Salt is not a herb or a spice that loses its specific properties over time. It's a mineral and is salty since millions of years. It will still be salty if you're already gone. No need to worry here! It will be salty long enough.


0

I golden brown the roasts after seasoning with steak or roast seasoning. put in oven or crockpot. add a little water, cover and cook until about half way. then I remove while the roast is still firm to cut through, making about 3/4 in slices. lay them back in the broth after tasting the broth and see if it needs more of something. by cutting, the juices ...


1

I learned a little trick for this while living in Italy. When you are cooking the spinach, add a bit of milk or heavy cream, just enough to coat it lightly and cook off. I use about 2 tbsp for about 6 oz of raw spinach. Alternatively, I have soaked spinach in milky water before cooking. Rather than patting it dray or straining it, I use tongs to pull the ...


1

Depending on where your recipe came from, real red chicory: is a hybrid between Radicchio and Belgian endives: and is grown in just a few places in Belgium and tastes quite different from the normal chicory (locally it's known as "sweet chicory"). So: if it's an Italian recipe, substitute the Belgian endives you bought for Radicchio If it's a Belgian ...


1

Saliva breaks down sugars and starches. That is why candies dissolve so well, and it's why bread or crackers taste sweeter the longer you chew them. What saliva does not break down are acids, which are tart or sour. The longer you chew the fruit, the more sugars and starches are broken down and swallowed, leaving the tangier acids intact.


4

First and foremost, for both types remove the white core, which is the most bitter part. Some recipes omit that bit of instruction, assuming the reader knows this. Next, the bitter compounds are water soluble, so soaking the cut leaves for half an hour or - if applicable - blanching will remove excessive bitterness. (Yes, you will leach out vitamins, but ...


4

The bitterness of chicory can be ameliorated somewhat by blanching. Of course, you can also add sugar and/or salt. Those things might make chicory seem less bitter, but bitterness is what chicory brings to the table. If you don't like the bitterness, I suggest looking for a less bitter vegetable. Frisee is another type of chicory that is less bitter than the ...


-3

No umami is not a taste, umami means flavor. I've read a couple of sites from non-Japanese that had this misconception. Most commonly the flavor extract of glutamates + sodium from kelp but it doesn't have to be. It can be practically any food stock but people started misappropriating it to MSG specifically and a "glutamate taste" category. When used in ...


0

I will relate my personal process as it relates to the "less salty" comment, though it may or may not reflect the actual process at your restaurants... I buy Kalamata olives (pitted) in 2 kg "kegs" since it seems to be the only way to get them at a reasonable price. They are packed in brine, and are quite salty - they keep fine unopened at room temperature, ...


3

In comments you note that you last bought a jar of green, pitted olives in brine. Those tend to be much saltier than the versions served as a mezze in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern restaurants, in part because the restaurant versions are usually whole and thus have less surface contact with the storage brine. They're also fresher; restaurants that go ...


3

Assuming that you are buying from supermarket shelves,(and not, say, from olive bars that some supermarkets have) there is a quality difference between shelf-stable canned and jarred olives vs. olives available in olive bars like Whole foods or in a Mediterranean deli. These come oil cured or submerged in water, and cannot be stored for long term, and they ...


1

Since the flavor of mint fades with heat, I suggest you add the dried mint as a topping upon serving after you turn off the heat, and after pouring your recipe into the serving dish.


2

Pure peppermint, wintergreen oils, and menthol crystals are easily found online. A little goes a long way, and they'll stand up to 100°C for at least 15 minutes.


1

A quarter teaspoon of calcium hydroxide (slaked lime) will neutralize acid nicely, without adding a nasty flavor as does sodium bicarbonate. Found this out while nixtamalizing corn for tortillas. It works well for over-acid tomatoes, but you want to avoid adding too much as the base itself is not very soluble. You can buy the stuff at any Mexican or Latin ...


2

The aroma and flavor of mint is destroyed very rapidly by heat. If you want a big mint impact, I would eliminate the dried (dried herbs can be good, but are a completely different flavor profile from fresh) and add a lot of fresh mint immediately before serving.


2

Usually when sauteeing (or more precisely, sweating) vegetables meant to form an aromatic base, you're doing three things: Breaking down cell walls Developing new flavors through mild caramelization Driving off moisture The first of these is really the most important; driving off moisture is a natural result of doing so. The cell walls in vegetables act ...


3

You can' "cook off" acidity, but you can balance it. Typically in marinara, that is done with a small amount of sugar, or, better yet, half of a grated carrot per 28 oz can of tomatoes, sweated with your onion.



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