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Typical standards are: Edam and Colby – up to 6 months Mild – up to 9 months Tasty – up to 18 months Vintage – up to 24 months Epicure – up to 36 months In our modern processed and bar-coded product world, cheese is auctioned/sold by the ton as either "frozen" for future ageing, or "young cheese" for ageing or processing See ...


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There are two different types of flavors: The fundamental tastes that are chemically detected by the taste buds directly: salty, sweet, bitter, sour, and possibly "umami" The flavors that are detected by aromatic molecules being detected through aroma, through the olfactory system--the nose has connections directly to the mouth as well as the outside ...


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According to Dairy Australia, an Australian industry association (emphasis added): Cheddar Classifications Mild Cheddar - matures for one to three months. Semi-matured - matures for three to six months. Matured or tasty - matures for six to 12 months. Vintage - matures for 12 to 24 months.


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Acidity is usually considered desirable in coffee, but maybe that's just not to your taste? Often single-origin beans are given a light roast to preserve acidity, but you can find dark-roasted single-origins. A dark roast will knock out most of the acid. Over-brewing tends to make for a bitter brew, not a sour one. It's also possible that you're getting ...


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Sourness beyond what is desirable in coffee usually stems from too long extraction time. The longer the ground beans are steeped in hot water, the more flavors are extracted from the beans. However, the longer you extract the flavor, the more acidity is extracted. I usually extract for two to three minutes.


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I am pretty sure this is closely linked with the cleanliness of your apparatus. From experience I have brewed consistently sour coffees using a plunger, despite altering beans, brew temperature, grind settings and brew timings. I then cleaned my plunger thoroughly with detergent and a scrub-brush, pulling it apart to ensure nothing was missed, and was then ...


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Browning meat helps increase the savory, satisfying taste called umami. Umami is the taste of free amino acids. Free means the aminos are not bound into a protein. Glutamate, the most common amino acid, is required for umami to be tasted. But when glutamate is combined with certain other free amino acids, the umami taste is increased at a multiplicative rate ...


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Browning ingredients (both meat and vegetables including the aromatics) before doing a braise or stew (which is what slow cookers do) helps develop depth of flavor, through the Maillard reaction where proteins and carbohydrates react together to create a myriad of flavorful compounds. Vegetables that are high in sugar, such as onions or leeks, and even ...



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