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9

Yes, and Wikipedia has a brief summary of these scales (with some further details in other portions of the article and the links). Basically, at least four of the five recognized primary "tastes" have a reference compound that other foods are compared to subjectively. For sweetness, a solution containing the test compound is diluted until sweetness can ...


1

Your example of sweetness reminded me of degrees brix: the sugar content of an aqueous solution. Might this be an example of what you are seeking? Not sure I can come up with anything close for other tastes...


0

I would suggest that it is not that complicated...not easy, but not that complicated. It begins and ends with technique. Chef's and cooks learn and master cooking techniques. The tools and processes of the trade...how to cook things...frequently, from a particular cultural perspective, but I think there is more similarity here, rather than huge ...


2

They will not "melt" into the sauce, but I think your desired effect depends on how long they cook in the sauce. I frequently make "pickled" mustard seeds, which result in a softer seed that pops in your mouth, rather than remaining crunchy. A great garnish or condiment. Not crunchy at all. There are two ways to do this: 1. bring to a boil, then strain, ...


1

No, they will not melt or soften. If your recipe doesn't provide any step for smoothing the sauce, then it is probably meant to stay chunky. If you don't like it that way, you have three options to make it smooth: strain it, as you suggested. It will work as long as the sauce is reasonably liquid. The taste will be less strong than intended. puree ...


3

I am not a professional chef, but I have worked in restaurant kitchens, and have been lucky enough to befriend some enormously talented people - line cooks, pastry chefs, culinary school graduates, and executive chefs. I'm basing this mostly on my observations of the way they work, and the conversations I've had with them. Although I never sat down and ...


2

I am by no means a professional chef, and I don't even know one, but I think the same rules apply. I do the cooking at home as I totally love that. My wife always say that I missed my calling. I almost never work from a recipe. Creating good food, and great tasting food for that matter depens on your knowlegde of your ingredients and how adventurous you ...


4

While I haven't heard of it happening for the specific ingredients you list, yes, the blender can make stuff really bitter. There are two ways this can happen. First, a chemical reaction. A blender really churns the stuff through, driving lots of air bubbles into the mixture with some force. It also causes friction heat, especially professional grade ...


6

tl;dr: Grapefruit oil is the most likely missing link. Squeeze some grapefruit peels into your mix, or pick up a "food-grade" or "therapy-grade" essential oil (for extremely sparing use). In the absence of more information, I'll go ahead and take a broad pass at this. As I mention in comments, more data will help us get closer. As a starting point, ...



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