New answers tagged

1

There are varieties of carrots that have been bred for extra sugar, but you won't find them in your typical grocery store. Most of the grocery store carrots have been bred for color, shape, production and storage. In grocery stores that sell loose carrots, you can sometimes find 'winter carrots'. They're quite large (nearly 2" / 5cm across). These are ...


0

Bar Akiva, you are very lucky as this is a really easy problem to solve: just don't use sausage in your ragu! Traditional ragus don't have sausage at all. The usual recipes call for minced beef or minced calf meat as a primary ingredient; to it you can add a quantity of minced pork to add more flavour (by adding fat), balancing on your taste between 50% ...


3

If you have not already looked, check the vegetarian section of where-ever you get groceries. At least here in the USA there are several varieties of Italian "sausage" that are entirely meat free and kosher. YMMV, but I find them to be an entirely satisfactory substitute.


12

By "Italian Sausage" I think you mean the seasoned pork sausage available in many supermarkets throughout the US. I've found that a 30-70 mix of beef and turkey/chicken works reasonably well as a substitute when pork is not available. Beef is too strong a flavor and turkey too weak in its own. Flavor-wise most italian sausage has red wine, fennel, and ...


16

If the recipes were truly interesting in 'releasing the flavors', they'd be sweating the onions, not sauteing them. Sauté is a higher-heat method that will cook the vegetables to create other chemical compounds, thus changing their flavor. In the case of garlic and onions, this cooking makes them dramatically sweeter. But sometimes you don't want that -- ...


4

Thai soups (Tom Kha, Tom Yum etc) are an interesting counterexample - where shallots, peppers, onions ... are just thrown in the broth in many recipes. Moreover, there are lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves and other more specialised aromatics that are almost never sauteed in these, even if the same ARE sauteed (as part of a curry paste) in other ...


6

That is really a matter of choice. If you cook the veggies for a while, they will also release their aromatics.... but they taste different. Especially if using onions. and especially if you sautee long enough to brown. Not browning bones and veggies gives a light boullion, browning them a brown bouillon. To give you an example: Marcella Hazan gives in her ...


-1

Soak the fish covered in water with salt and sugar for 10-30 min. About 2 tbsp of salt and the same amount of sugar when using a cup of water. After soaking, rinse the fish, then rub in the same amount of salt and sugar (like a dry rub). You can add some black pepper too, if you like. Let the fish sit in a bowl until the oil starts coming out of the ...


5

In some recipes (eg chinese kung bao, some thai and south indian soups), you score the peppers or cut them into coarse pieces, so cooking oil or a broth with some fat or alcohol content can enter and exit the inside while the peppers are sauteed/stir fired with the rest of the food. This tends to dissolve a lot of heat into the liquids without too strong a ...


1

How about using Adam from Hair of the Dog beer? It is noted especially for its taste of fine leather. Honest and not kidding. It is also noted that it's tastes great with chocolate and cigars, so I bet you could somehow make use of it. Adam - Hair of the Dog


2

It depends on the recipe but, clarifying butter removes fat, milk, sugar, etc from the butter. Leaving a pure (clean) product. Clarifying it will remove any likelyhood of contamination (spoilage) and will reduce separation. Try cooking green beans (or any veggie) in a pot with water and add a significant amount of butter, then put it in the fridge ...


4

As long as the eggs aren't expired you should be fine. I've made creme brulee many times with both fresh eggs and not so fresh with similar results.


4

Let's see how to GUARANTEE this undesired effect happening (if you do/have all or most of the things on the list): -Unevenly cut onions -Onions from different varieties mixed -Pan very hot -Not frequently stirring (or saute throwing) -Thin bottomed pan on a hob plate with low thermal mass and weak heat coupling (glass ceramic or electric coil would be ...


2

Unless your garlic has fungus growing on it or is badly discolored it's unlikely this flavor is from it. Garlic generally keeps very well and is still safe to use, and still flavorful even when it's a bit shriveled. It's much more likely these off flavors are coming from another ingredient, and could be a sign of some sort of contamination, in which case ...


1

No, you cannot salvage it. First, once a flavor is in a dish, there is no way to remove it. Masking it slightly (which diverts the attention from it but does not remove it) and dilution are possibilities, but removal isn't. Second, mildew is mold, and many species of mold are toxic to humans. As there is no way to find out if yours is toxic or harmless, ...


3

Pros: Higher smoking point. Regular butter's smoking point is 325-375F while clarified butter is around 485F. But it can still smoke and burn! However the higher smoking point means it'll be much more applicable in terms of sauteing food without worrying about burning the butter. 100% fat. Often times its hard to calculate the exact replacements in baking ...


2

Unfortunately (actually… let's say fortunately) homemade yoghurt still contains a lot of active cultures which will continue to work even after you refrigerate it. Refrigeration will slow that process down, but it will not stop it completely. There are two (well, three) things you can do to avoid that tart flavor from the active cultures at work: ...


0

Phenylthiocarbamide would be my guess. Some people can taste it, and some people cannot, and that is genetical. It is extremely bitter if you can taste it. We used it in social conformity experiments in psychology: if you dont taste it, but everyone else, you conform or not etc... Now, how that stuff gets into your fish... I remember something about it ...


1

I tried this recently. Washed & dried them and put them in a plastic bag in freezer for 30 mins only. It worked well for me - they were much tastier and a better texture.


1

I find that there actually are (or maybe I got lucky as my sample size has been small...). Where I live there is a type of carrot that is usually sold massive in size, it is around 2"-3" in diameter at the stem-end of the carrot and it stays fat and thick all the way to the tip (usually about a foot long). Some of the larger grocery stores carry them but the ...


2

Carrots get sweeter if they are left in the garden till after the ground freezes (generally under mulch to facilitate winter digging.) Then again, I personally consider cooking carrots a good way to ruin them, as I find them far better raw.


1

While some carrot varieties are naturally woody in taste most carrot varieties have a natural sweetness to them, especially when they are well grown and fresh. While I'm not on the organic band-wagon this is one case where I've found that buying organic does generally get you a better product as the carrots are grown better and allowed to mature, most cheap ...


1

There are many recipes for glazed carrots Google - glazed carrot recipes. Generally using brown sugar or honey and butter, sometimes adding additional flavorings such as orange, bourbon or herbs.



Top 50 recent answers are included