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0

Use lemon or lime juice. Has the acidity you are looking for and is culturally appropriate.


1

I suggest adding more lime zest and use key lime juice (bottled juice would be okay for baking - Nellies makes a good product and it's widely available (usually sold with mixers)


1

Without seeing the recipe, it's difficult to know what can be improved. Here are some possibiliies: Your easiest addition would be to add more lime zest -- it contains much of the flavor, and it won't significantly throw off the moisture or acid balance in the cake. If you're going to be stacking the cake, instead of using frosting between the layers, you ...


3

My daughter who loves lemon cake thought of a great idea a couple years ago to knock the lemon flavor out of the park. I'm sure it would work for lime too: make a lime syrup and pour it into the bottom of the cake after poking it all over with a thin skewer. The more lime you like, the more syrup you use. As a bonus, it also adds some moisture to the cake. ...


0

make sure you are getting the most out of your limes with 5 Fabulous Lime Tips remember Key limes are more tart than Tahitian limes (given the choice...) if the recipe calls for salt-- reduce the amount (salt increases the sweetness, muting the tart & tang of the limes) you might add a little concentrated lime juice (just a splash!) Good luck with ...


-1

You can add more lime zest, you can also add more juice, but when you increase the tartness of the cake, you need To increase the sugar to offset it. You'll reach a point of diminishing returns however and you may be better off making a key lime pie rather than a cake.


2

It likely matter how you qualify 'aftertaste'. I was watching a documentary on artificial sweeteners, and they specifically mentioned that with sucrose, there's a period of time where you continue to sense it. (I'm having difficulty finding what they called that variable, and what the time is for sucrose ... I want to say it was either 0.5 seconds or 1 ...


4

American versions of Mongolian BBQ are often pretty sweet (this doesn't sound like an authentic recipe). More soy sauce (or more of everything but the sugar) would cut the sweetness. Chili oil would certainly give it heat, but isn't going to temper the sweetness much. Any of the following would offset the sweetness and be appropriate for this type of dish: ...


1

Glass is very non-porous and should generally not retain any flavor or odor. A good wash with hot soapy water and a very good rinsing should take care of the issue.


1

I have discovered that making a paste of butter, salt, pepper and herbs, and rubbing it under the meat, make the meat more flavorful. You separate the skin from the meat by working your hand under the skin where the breast meets the opening of the cavity. Do one side at a time, and be gentle as the skin tears easily. work you fingers over the breast ...


2

The glass jar should be mostly residue-free due to the smooth surface. Sometimes slight traces remain when the jar is hand-washed but the harsher detergents usually used in dishwashers should get rid of them easily. (Side note: Don't do this to the coveted stained teapot of a true tea aficionado...) The other parts are a different issue: often, they are ...



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