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1

Tried soaking my whisky rocks (which I think are soapstone) in lemon juice sealed in a Tupperware container. Seems to have worked so far. Gonna dry them out & keep them inside a container in the fridge. Fingers crossed.


0

Buy a bag of frozen fruit. Add about a tablespoon of sugar to the fruit and let that sit in a bag in the fridge for a day or so, moving it around every now and then. Then fold it into the yogurt.


1

Well, in my situation I find the difference with the water. I go to my hometown every summer and winter and whenever I make coffee, it doesn't matter how much coffee I use since it tastes pretty good and doesn't have any sour flavor. However, I travel back to the U.S. and again, the coffee tastes way too sour. The only way to drink it is adding cream or ...


2

Try Mul yeot (Korean corn syrup) or molasses (as suggested by ElendilTheTall). Consider replacing corn starch by potato starch which gives a texture stickier than corn starch. They best way to get the exact stickiness is to try the ingredients in different quantities until you master your dish :). Good luck.


2

You could also try adding a half ounce of pectin so it doesn't throw of the sweet/sour ratio. I use it in hot sauce all the time so it isn't runny or to watery. they sell it in the canning section of most stores.


4

I would consider adding some soft brown sugar. The molasses content should increase the stickiness and thickness of the sauce overall. You may want to reduce the amount of white sugar to compensate.


4

There is no one answer, as each manufacturer has different processes Most flavours are simple esters, acids, and salts that mimic the main flavour notes of the food being replicated. Some high quality chips will use actual freeze dried powders made from the actual food e.g. Ham powder = the good stuff is freeze dried and then powdered real ham, the other ...


0

Well I certainly know the flavor can get out. I have been experimenting with fried chicken - butter milk and flour - and want to make a kfc style hot and spicy. Easier said than done. I have tried adding bottles of hot chilli sauce, chopping up piles of chilli and adding tablespoons of cayenne pepper. In every case the "Hot" gets out. I think the ...


1

There is one sense in which searing meat really does seal it. For a long time it was genuinely believed that searing meat in some way "sealed" it. As other answers have already shown, this is nonsense. Indeed it's quite easy to prove: Sear a piece of meat. Roast the piece of meat. Observe whether the meat inflates or perhaps bursts. If you put a sealed ...


10

Is "sealing in the flavor" an actual thing? No, it isn't. As Harold McGee explains in his excellent reference work On Food and Cooking (emphasis mine): The best-known explanation of a cooking method is probably this catchy phrase: "Sear the meat to seal in the juices." The eminent German chemist Justus von Liebig came up with this idea around 1850. ...


0

I personally know nothing about cooking but my dear departed mother did. She used a tip that had been passed on by her mother. Before cooking, she would treat meat by pouring on boiling water and then drying. I remember once asking why and she said that she did it to seal the meat. I didn't probe further but I always assumed that it somehow kept the flavour ...


-1

True story: I love beef jerky. The other day when I had a whole topside to play with, I made a batch of biltong on top of the three batches of jerky I had made. Just for fun (and to see what would happen) I seared two of the fillets and treated the other three with vinegar as usual for biltong. I then put all 5 into my dehydrater at 35C and waited for ...


20

There is a grain of truth in the claim that flash-freezing beef "seals in flavour". If meat (or anything else) is frozen slowly, large ice crystals form. These puncture the cells, resulting in a mushy texture when the food is thawed. But, because a lot of the cells have burst, all their contents can drain out, too, so you're going to lose flavour. However, ...


31

Searing on a grill to "seal in juices" has largely been disproven. Meat loses juice at roughly the same speed regardless of searing the meat first. Searing does produce the Maillard reaction and caramelization which enhances flavor; however, searing first doesn't produce better results. A test performed by Alton Brown in 2008 demonstrated that searing at ...



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