New answers tagged

5

Produce growers manipulate the plants until they find one with thick skins that can be transported, and picked green but will produce a nice color once on the shelves of the grocers. They are not cultivated for vitamin content nor taste, but just so they transport good and 'appear' good to the customer. Tomatoes are a particular letdown for me. Some ...


10

You have fallen to false believe that fruits from Spain are grown on the fields. Where they are planted in soil by Jose and they go through full vegetation cycle under the Spanish sky. In fact, those tasteless fruits are probably from Almeria greenhouses. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=4508 The seedlings are imported from other ...


32

In addition to Max's answer, much UK supermarket fruits and vegetables are from varieties grown to have tough skins (so they don't damage in transit), have a long shelf life (so they can be transported long distances and won't go off in the shop), and don't easily bruise / spoil. UK consumers (at least according to supermarkets) care more about cosmetic ...


7

We are planting tomatoes. Some outside in the garden, some in the glasshouse. Seeds are very same, soil, treatment, everything is same - except for the weather. The ones from glasshouse are lesser tasty compared with the ones from garden. But both outclass the ones from supermarkets. The reasons why the fruits and vegetables lack taste are: Picking up ...


35

Non-native and out of season fruits and vegetables that are available in northern countries (e.g. UK, Canada) need to be shipped from far away and will be picked before they are naturally ripe (under the normal sun and heat and getting nutrients from the soil). They will ripen in controlled environments (UV lights, maybe controlled atmosphere and ...


1

Yes you can mature cheeses, most hard cheeses can be matured either in the refridgerator or elsewhere. Remove from the plastic packaging, the cheese will need to breathe, but not dry out - a cardboard box, paper towels, parchment paper would work. Just be careful on the amount of moisture & bacteria/mold growth. You'll find a lot more helpful ...


0

You can't remove salt from a dish once it's added, so Shog9 has the only correct answer to this question: add more ingredients to dilute the salt. The commonly suggested "remedy" of adding potato in various forms is only really attempting to mask the salt flavor. It does nothing to actually remove the salt from the dish. Any starch will lessen your ...


-1

I add a large, peeled potato or several peeled carrots to the soup or stock as it cools. Cooking the desalinating root vegetable interferes with the osmotic process. As the salty soup cools, the starchy root vegetable(s) absorb the excess salt. This is not a quick fix and requires several hours or overnight refrigeration. Remove the root vegetable(s) and ...


1

I had an "old salt" say that it is the "belly meat" that tastes fishy. When fileting, don't cut all the way down to the belly. Seems to be the secret.


1

A bit late to the party but .... Onion and celery have similar effect in the mirepoix, the leeks will have a similar effect but with more depth on the sweet side & carrot will bring some sweetness. Based on that, depending on what you want to cook, there are some guidelines. For stews, keep in mind that some of the next ingredients might add some ...



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