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12

Authentic flour tortillas use lard. For an authentic taste, use that, or consider using shortening or butter since they are solid at room temperature like lard. You also might want to consider increasing the fat in your recipe. Fat will coat the proteins of your flour and keep the gluten network from forming so easily. I was also taught when making ...


7

Try brushing the tortilla with oil, and baking it upside down over a steel bowl.


7

JustRightMenus touched on this topic in this answer to a similar question. Quoting that answer: you can make your own shell for taco salad by placing a large flour (burrito-size) tortilla in an oven-safe bowl (shaped however you'd like) and putting a big ball of tinfoil inside it. You can also do the opposite - place the bowl upside-down and drape the ...


4

I buy tortillas in bulk (36 to 48) at a time. I freeze them because even our family of 6 won't go through them fast enough if left in the refrigerator! I stack them with individual freezer wax paper between the tortillas (get them at warehouse stores such as costco) and then place in a plastic freezer bag or in a plastic storage container. I THAW them in ...


4

If you are freezing the tortillas yourself and don't mind putting in a little extra work in the beginning to get more convenience later, I would separate the tortillas with waxed paper (actually I use the paper sheets that are waxed on one side, intended for bakeries). What this buys you is the ability to pull out one or two tortillas as you need them. ...


4

The microwave is good for this sort of thing. Just wrap them in a towel to hold in steam and go for a couple minutes until they are soft. Or if you aren't too worried about plastic toxicity, you can put a few holes in the bag they came in and do it right in that.


4

I was always taught to cook tortillas in a dry skillet (cast iron for the best flavor) on med high-high heat until blisters form, then flip cook only until the blisters brown, then remove to a napkin lined plate and cover with another napkin (this allows their own steam to keep them moist. It sounds like you're frying your tortillas which may account for ...


3

I use a liquid oil instead of a spray oil; you're far more likely to get hot spots with a spray, which is bad for any kind of cooking. That stuff works better as a grease than an actual cooking oil. I also tend to have pretty good success by frying the tortillas up to just a hint of golden-brown (dark brown spots is overdone) and then finishing it off (i.e. ...


3

Your best bet it to divide the dough into two batches, freezing half for later. With the half you are working with, add 1/2 recipe worth of all the other ingredients again, except the lard. This will bring you into balance. The tortillas may be somewhat tougher than you would get if they were made to specification the first time, but that will avoid ...


2

Don't use oil, tortilla's don't need oil to finish. They should have only been lightly cooked to begin with. The tortilla's need to be soft and pliable before cooking, if they have dried out, lightly steam them in the microwave in a closed container or plastic bag If they stick to the pan use a better finish cast pan (cast iron is good) and lower the heat. ...


2

If you're going to fry in oil, then just use a ladle to get the bowl shape you desire. I've done that in the past with good results.


1

3 1/2 cups flour sifted 1/2 cup vegtable shortening ( I use the butter flavored) 1/4 tsp baking soda 1 tsp of salt About 1 cup of hot water( I place it on the stove and as soon as the first couple of ripples form I turn it off) Add flour, salt and baking soda first. Mix well then with your fingertips incorporate the shortening thru the flour ( do not melt ...


1

I've seen a posting somewhere that used a muffin pan, putting it upside down and placing smaller tortillas in between the crevices before baking. They look great, wavy, just like they serve in the restaurants!


1

I somehow acquired a "tortilla bowl maker" as a gift. It looks something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Nonstick-Tortilla-Bowl-Makers/dp/B00005EBH7/. It's essentially a metal mold with ridged sides on the "bowl". We baked flour tortillas on it, but the results were . . . "eh". You may have better luck making bowls from corn tortillas, though.



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