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1

Because the molten lava cake you have pictured from any restaurant isn't made up of cake. It's really a BROWNIE! That is why the different density and the difference in richness. I know. I make them in a high end restaurant in Wisconsin.


2

You could roll it between sheets of plastic wrap or parchment paper, if you have those.


1

As you're making a dessert, you could use confectioner's sugar, but you might want to reduce the sugar in the filling slightly. Superfine sugar can also work, but you'll end up adding more sugar to the crust in the process. Another alternative is to grate the crust using the largest set of holes on your box grater (you may need to re-freeze it for this), ...


1

Cornstarch or fine cornmeal would work fine. You could use bisquick or something similar in a pinch, though that may have consequences. All you're really doing is trying to keep it from sticking as you roll it out.


0

The BBC is a good source for classic british food; here is a classic buttermilk scone recipe here, and here is another made with milk. (I'd say buttermilk is the better way to make them. The correct way to eat one is in a cream tea - a pot of tea, a scone with tea, strawberry or raspberry jam, and clotted cream, served around 3 in the afternoon. Nothing ...


4

My dough whisk, Vera, is one of the most useful utensils in my kitchen. There's something magical about the loops that cause whatever you're mixing to combine easier and faster than using a spoon. Not to be confused with a wire whisk, a dough whisk won't whip very much air into the mixture — unless you want it to. For making your shortbread, operate it ...


2

Shortbread should be crisp and crumbly, using a mixer to mix the flour in will work the glutens in the flour and make the dough stretchy which is not what you want. Using a spoon (wooden or not doesn't make any difference) or scraper will help limit the working of the dough. So cream the butter and sugar with the mixer for sure, but then stir in the flour ...


1

There seems to be no clear definition for what "gluten free all purpose flour" is. If you look at two popular brand you will find that one of them is using rice flour, the other a legume flour as their main ingredient. These two ingredients behave very very differently - rice flour is a starchy affair that is good at making things crisp, legume flours are ...



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