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1

There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


2

With gluten free flour blends, it's best to reduce cooking liquids by about a third to get baked products of the correct texture, but each flour blend is a little bit different in terms of how much water it needs. Also, they need to be allowed to cool all the way down, as gluten free flours tend to stay very moist when fresh baked, but lose moisture very ...


2

This recipe is way too low in gluten, or even gluten free. You need wheat flour (or flour of other very closely related species such as spelt) to get a batter which can rise and bake normally. Any flour which does not contain gluten is not capable of trapping the bubbles created by the baking powder, and the moisture of the batter cannot escape the dough ...


2

Dice the butter and use the paddle attachment, as sourd'oh recommended. The paddle will break up the butter some, but more importantly will 'squish' the pieces, making them thinner and flatter. That will layer the butter through your pastry, making it flaky. This is similar to the effect of coarsely grating the butter, but will create a good shape and mix ...


3

They make whole wheat flour, but their bread flour is definitely refined; it does not contain bran or germ. Their bread flour is milled from a specific hard red spring wheat from North and South Dakota. That particular wheat is higher in protein than the wheat and wheat blends of other brands of bread flour. KA's whole wheat flour (not the white whole ...


3

No, there is no substitute for gluten, at all. The gluten + soft flour combination is itself a substitute for bread flour, so if you can get bread flour, as Catija suggested, use it. If you can't, you need another recipe. Especially if your goal is to "not make it complicated", don't use substitutes. Substitutes are always complicated. The easy thing is to ...


2

The yellow flour you are referring to is most likely durum wheat semolina, which is yellow in color and is often used in making pasta, breads, and pizza dough. As noted in some of the comments, semolina can come from different grains and other types of wheat. Please see this link for more information about semolina.


1

What you really need is "in the middle". Shortbread cookies are not very different from shortbread pie crust, they use the same principle, but a different shape. So the optimal flour would be pastry flour, at 6-7% gluten, which is between cake flour (4-5%) and AP (7-8%). If you are not aiming for five-star-perfection according to century-old traditional ...


0

shosrtbread cookies are meant to be somewhat crumbly because they have a high butter (fat) content. If you use AP flour they will be a little more sturdy than the ones made with cake flour. Cake flour is meant for cakes and other breads that have to be light and not chewy. That is the basic difference. However, I have made shortbread cookies with totally non ...



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