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More flour will result in a "breadier" cookie. It will have more structure and be less chewy. Less flour will do the opposite, resulting in a softer, flatter cookie. http://www.handletheheat.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-chocolate-chip-cookies/


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A general answer, because a concise answer would need an entire recipe. (all ratios that follow are by weight not volume measures) Flour gives the cookie structure. The commonly followed ratio is: Cookie dough = 3 parts flour, 2 parts fat, 1 part sugar That 3:2:1 ratio results in the most common cookie texture. Adding more flour give you a hard ...


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I would leave out the bread improver, the olive oil, and the milk (use water) and see what happens. Both the bread improver and the fat make softer bread. If this is not sufficient and/or you really insist on resilient bread, the next steps are look at the gluten content of your flour and use a higher gluten content if yours is low. American bread uses ...


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Bread is given structure by gluten strands which stretch out and interlock. This is done mechanically by kneading and through the action of yeast, with yeast action being more important. If gluten is not well developed enough then you get a weak structure which can expand too much, if it is too developed then you get a tough bread. I think what is ...


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It's easy for me to tell how it smells. Trust me it smells like pigeon. I had an craft made up of flour. Once that was rotten, it started to smell. When ever I entered the room, I felt like a pigeon had been there already, but then I discovered that craft stank so bad, I had to take it out since it was the source.



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