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2

There is so much confusion when people don't call the Caputo flours by their real names. There is no such things called Caputo "Rosso" or "Blue". This is what everybody wants to call them, and it leads to confusion. Caputo has a flour called Pizzeria that comes in 55 lb (25 kilo) bags which happen to be Blue. They also have a small blue bag that is 2.2 lbs ...


2

Corn masa is what you need for this. The process of nixtamalization makes the corn more easily ground and therefore the texture of doughs made with it will not be "gritty" in the way that a dough made with corn meal or corn flour will be. Also, corn masa (or masa harina) is more nutritious than standard corn products due to the chemical changes that result ...


-2

Use more egg and flour is my advice.


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Corn flour is known in the US as cornstarch, it's not the right thing at all. You want corn meal. Corn starch is used as a thickening agent, it's not something you could use to make a dough. Depending on where you are in the world corn meal may be called Polenta or Masa if it's not called corn meal.


1

Just a few weeks ago, I was trying to make empenadas with a corn dough, and the dough didn't quite come together (as it was way too wet and sticky, even after I let it sit and hydrate for a while). I'm not sure what I did wrong, But I also had problems with shaping them. I got around the issue with the following technique: Cut up a large zip-top plastic ...


0

You cannot keep the texture if you are using that much sugar. Two tablespoons of sugar per cup of flour is the maximum that you can add without major gluten damage. [...] Too much sugar is also damaging to the yeast. (quotation from Cookwise by S. Corriher). She goes on to explain that certain kinds of bread are made with more sweetness (including ...


0

I've never tried making a bread dough with that much sugar in it. You're up to ~80g sugar, compared to 140g flour (a "baker's ratio" of 57%). It's possible that much sugar interferes with gluten development. Since you're already adding butter later (at around 4:07 in the video), the first thing I'd try is to mix the extra sugar and butter together, and add ...


0

You can also use xanthan gum in soups as a thickener (but not 1:1 in substitution of flour). We use that in our keto diet. Bob's Mill simple desciption Wikipedia Personally I would not use a whole 1/4 cup of flour to thicken a soup. I would use heavy cream and/or blend a portion of the soup.


1

A wild suggestion here --- go on Facebook and ask Marcus Samuelsson. Of anyone in the US that would have the definitive answer, I'd bet on Marcus.


3

My step daughter also has celiacs/coeliacs disease. We often use all-purpose gluten free flour for soups, cheese sauce and roux etc. I can honestly say there is no noticeable difference. The only thing I would recommend is if the recipe asks you to make a roux don't try and cook out the flour as it will turn lumpy. Instead just melt the butter, add the flour ...


2

You can use pure starch for that, you don't need a flour. If you are careful with the sprinkling, it will work too. But the easiest way is to dissolve a bit of starch with a bit of water in a teacup, and pour into the sauce. No clumping, and it thickens beautifully. The sauce needs to come to a boil for the starch to work, I don't know if this is needed ...


7

The closest thing you are likely to find is a product called Wondra flour. Like idealmjöl, it is a pre-gelated wheat flour, but unlike idealmjöl it also includes some malted barley flour. One post on this forum implies they may be interchangeable.


1

Alex and Aki at "Ideas in Food" have developed a gluten free flour that works as a substitute for wheat flour in almost any situation. I have used it successfully in a roux. http://blog.ideasinfood.com/ideas_in_food/2012/02/what-iif-flour.html



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