New answers tagged

-1

Flour absorbs moisture. Dab oil on your nails after you work with flour. The world-record holder for longest nails (Lee Redmond) soaks(-ed) her nails in warm olive oil once a week.


-1

Flour is abrasive. Its small radius particles will grind away softer material like nails; and will get in places you would not expect. Flour will also absorb moisture and dry out your nails, making them more brittle than usual. I recommend that you remove nail polish before kneading bread for that reason alone.


2

Based on your description, it looks like you've made the common error of assuming that equal volume is equal weight. Butter is more dense than flour so the same volume does not equal the same weight... you must convert the 1/4 cup for each product using a trustworthy site. Here's one that looks OK and includes both butter and flour. As you can see, 1/4 ...


2

No, you can do something to underthicken it (make a darker roux than the recipe intended by accidentally heating for too long), and you can get lumps in it, but there is no common mistake(1) which can cause too thick a sauce. From your description, it seems like you simply used way too much flour. 120 g to the cup is a pretty common conversion factor for ...


0

I think there are shops that use Bisquick. It is good. On ingredient cost alone, I think a home made Bisquick substitute would save you 20% or so. But there are hidden costs: Your time/labor cost weighing and mixing. You would have to cut in shortening..that equals cleaning labor time as well Your distraction. Fewer tasks = good. The likelihood your ...


0

I don't think there's anything wrong with your pasta dough. It's on the dry side of the spectrum, which makes it go through the roller easily without sticking, but it won't work well in an extruder. The edge cracking is normal, and you can always cut it off if desired. You can reduce cracking by working it to the full width of the machine at the ...


3

I'll added this as a comment, but it's probably close enough to a full answer, so I'll post it as one. My homemade pasta recipe is a little different. I initially got it from America's Test Kitchen TV show. I think they have a couple of different ones, but if I remember correctly off the top of my head, it's 2 cups of flour and 3 whole eggs. It's always a ...


4

I run a gluten free bakery and yes, over mixing is a concern for many cake batters, cookie doughs, pie crusts, etc. I find, what makes overmixing an issue is the gums used in the recipes. This being either xanthan or guar. An over-mixed cake batter will become very stringy and goopy, and will not pour smoothly when run off of a spoon, for example. Cookie ...



Top 50 recent answers are included