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General purpose flour contains about the lowest amount of protein where you bring out the gluten through the process of keading. I start with a small amount of flour mix and add water slowly until it flows like pancake batter. Whip this quickly for several minutes to bring out the gluten and form long stretchy bands within the mix, then add small ...


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Well, I believe all the answers above touch on important points of the flour. I found a local pasta/bread business that orders their flour and they are willing to sell to me at market cost. This is a good quality source and with plenty of advice because they know their flours. The quality of the flour needs to contain 12% protein or greater for pizza to ...


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For millennia people have made white flour from some ground whole wheat flour. After grinding the wheat blend you choose, you simply use a type of sieve and sift the flour so that only the fine flour falls through leaving the bran in the sieve. This needs to be used right away or properly aged as it will otherwise go rancid. Hope this helps!


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There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


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You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


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With gluten free flour blends, it's best to reduce cooking liquids by about a third to get baked products of the correct texture, but each flour blend is a little bit different in terms of how much water it needs. Also, they need to be allowed to cool all the way down, as gluten free flours tend to stay very moist when fresh baked, but lose moisture very ...



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