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13

Do you have a French press? If so, you can make coffee that is quite strong in there and you can froth your milk. For the coffee, grind it course. If it's too fine, too much will go through the mesh and your coffee will be murky and over extracted. Buy a very dark roast, but something that isn't too smoky. Italian roast is too smoky. Espresso beans ...


12

When you boil water in a cup in a microwave, it will often boil without forming bubbles, because unlike a kettle with a rough heating element or inner surface, a clean ceramic cup has few nucleation points. Nucleation points allow pockets of gas to form, which become bubbles as the water boils. When you add the teabag to the hot water, you are essentially ...


9

Disclaimer: I am not an expert on foams. I've made a couple before, successfully, but never anything like a lobster bisque foam. So I would advise any casual readers to do their own fact-checking and try this on a small scale - at least until somebody can verify it. Now, onto the questions: I have Lecithin and Mono/diglyceride from a set. It says ...


7

According to a quick search it appears that your notion about it being protein-based is correct. Most of the recipes I've seen say to skim it; the above-linked site says that adding a little oil will keep the foam down. I personally wouldn't do anything with it as an ingredient unless I had a truly massive amount of it to experiment with--I don't know ...


5

Have you actually boiled it three times? Boiling coffee makes it smell like old floor rags, don't do that! What the Turkish method essentially is, you bring your coffee pot thrice up to, but not actually reaching, the boiling temperature, and you must never ever stir it. My favourite temperature is 85°C near bottom (measured with an electronic meat ...


5

Well, if you want to make the Viennese original, all you do is combine coffee and sweetened cream, the latter possibly whipped. The coffee can be brewed however you wish, although instant is probably not entirely authentic. :) You can add cinnamon and/or shaved chocolate, if desired. If you want to make the modern definition of cappuccino, it's based on ...


5

This isn't no fancy tools, but it is no expensive fancy tools and the results are pretty darn authentic. I make pretty reasonable cappucinos with: A cheap moka pot for the coffee. Makes strong almost-espresso shots of coffee, and doesn't need any electricity, just sits on the stove (good for me because power blackouts are common here) A cheap ...


4

A vita mix should work pretty well; maybe you could carefully drag a spatula in the top of the vortex (nowhere near the blade!) to introduce more air. A whisk will be pretty slow going. And then there is a whole other category of foams made in a whipped cream canister. Here is a link to get you started: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9lJMGImGKE


4

I suspect that if you are using egg whites, you won't need to add the lecithin. The egg whites are more than capable of creating a protein-based foam on their own. Using CO2 will give you residual carbonation. I would just use the NO2 (unless you want the foam to be somewhat sparkling). Oh, in fact here is a recipe confirming that just the egg whites are ...


4

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


3

There are various techniques, however here's how I do, and I usually get enough foam by making like this. Sometimes really much, sometimes just decent but never too little. First of all, put the water before the coffee to the cezve (or pot, however you call it). Then add the coffee without mixing it with the water. Do not mix it, just let it get into the ...


3

Agar is basically just a gelatin. Lecithin is a surfactant and emulsifier, which is what you ideally need for your foam. The agar probably isn't sufficient to create the necessary tensions between the oil and liquid and when you introduce air into the mixture it isn't being held in suspension, which is why your foam isn't 'holding up'. I'd strongly ...


3

I suspect your first problem is using the iSi whipper. It does create foams, particularly whipped cream, but both Khymos and Texturas advise using an immersion blender or electric eggbeaters in a broad vessel (so there is room for the bubbles to pile up without interfering with your making more). Besides, xanthan is shear-thinning, meaning that it is ...


3

I've had success with making milk foam using a mason jar. Put a cup of milk (whole, skim, 2%, whichever you prefer) in the jar and close it tightly. Shake the jar vigorously until you have the amount of foam you want. Immediately place the jar in a microwave (removing the metal cap) and cook for 30 seconds on high. Now you can scoop the foam out with a spoon ...


2

A little late answer but one time I experimented with using the foam from cooked chickpeas. I mixed it with a little sugar, put it on a pan and popped it in the oven. It hardened up, browned and came out somewhat similar to a meringue with a nice sweet taste, but I waited a bit too long, so the foam wasn't quite as fluffy as beaten egg whites. I'm not sure ...


2

It's not exactly what people mean by culinary foam, but you can make maple whipped cream. (It seems kinda like the original recipe you found was trying to do this, except it forgot that you can't really make whipped milk.) There are a lot of recipes you can find for this online. They probably won't be as concentrated maple flavor as a more pure maple foam, ...


2

Tannins produce foam in tea, and also streams and rivers.


2

The mixture does indeed set in the fridge. It remains airier than the average tiramisu I've eaten (but I don't know what commercial tiramisu contains, probably not a foam based on raw yolks), but it is firm enough to hold its shape when served. If a piece is forgotten outside overnight, it becomes softer again and runs slightly, but properly stored, it is ...


2

I don't think there is any thing wrong with what you've made. Tiramisu is a relatively recent dessert (forget about the 'Tuscan trifle' which did not even include mascarpone) created at Harry's Bar in Venice. As such there are many variations: some drier, some boozier, some creamier and some wetter and your recipe may just produce a wetter variety. Take in ...


2

I think you could have got away with the 55°C if you had let the yolks cool down before adding the cheese. I usually heat the yolks+sugar in a bain-marie, rather than directly; I never really measured the temperature, but I doubt it would be much higher than that. I think the further addition of cream probably did more harm than good... next time put only ...


2

Your recipe doesn't specify 55°C, and I'd be surprised if 5–8 minutes over barely simmering water only gets that hot. Indeed, checking for sources: McGee, in On Food and Cooking, says: When the temperature reaches 120°F/50°C, high enough to unfold some of the yolk proteins, the mix thickens, traps air more efficiently, and begins to expand. As the ...


2

Just an idea... I've had problems making foam because of hard/basic tap water (a lot of chalk in the water) - making frape though, not garlic foam:) Foam will more easily form in soft water as you can easily test with a piece of soap. If you have hard tap water you could try using boiled water (some of the chalk in the water will react and leave a residue on ...


2

A few weeks ago, I tried this for the first time with a friend. We were making kiwi foam and it seemed to be a disaster even after adding >2% of lecithin. There was a little bit of foam and it was thicker than the liquid we started out with, but it wouldn't stick. We finally gave up and said "it tastes good, so we'll serve it as is and call it something ...


2

First of all you are better off with Xanthan Gum instead of gelatin. Xanthan gum is relatively heat stable whereas gelatin is renowned for its inability to withstand any heat above 35 °C. 200g parmesan grated (including rind). 400ml full fat milk. 1 tbsp soy lecithin. Bring to simmer 5 min, then blend and pass through fine sieve. Taste for seasoning ...


2

You need something to froth the milk. You can't really do it without some sort of specialist tools but there are some cheap handheld things (e.g. battery-powered whisks - which don't work very well; hand-pumped frothers which look rather like a cafetiere - I've never tried one). "Milk frother" looks like a good search term. You're not going to get an ...


2

You can, somewhat surprisingly, froth milk with a (clean) French press (aka Cafetière) too (OP says he/she has a French press). So much so that some friends who drink milk in coffee (I don't) have miniature French presses for this purpose. Simply heat a small amount of milk (if you can remove the glass from your French press, microwave it in that), ...


1

The main point is: do not let the coffee boil. When foam starts to form, remove it with a spoon and pour into your coffee cup.



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