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12

Chocolate fondue is well known but not really an alternative, more like a dessert (if there is any appetite left!) There are other dishes which involve having the guests dip some solid food in a mostly liquid component themselves and immediately eat the result: Chinese hot pot (incidentally called “fondue chinoise” in French) Fondue bourguignonne (beef) ...


9

It's not a true Fondue but I've done something very similar by taking a white sauce base made with 50 / 50 wine and milk. You then melt in lots and lots of cheese and you get something very nice and similar to a fondue. You can pretty much use any reasonably melting cheese you like although a strong cheddar is very nice. For something really interesting add ...


8

Assuming this is a meat fondue (AKA fondue bourguignonne), using oil instead of cheese: There is no best or correct oil to use - each type of oil has its own characteristic flavour. However, a meat fondue generally involves heating the oil to 350-400° F (175-200° C), so you'll want to treat this more or less like deep-frying and use an oil with a ...


7

We made a Zesty Cheddar Fondue from The Melting Pot cookbook "Dip into Something Special". It is wonderful and a nice change of pace. 11 0z shredded Cheddar cheese 3 tbsp all-purpose flour 1 cup beer (light beer recommended) 4 tsp prepared horseradish 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce 4 tsp dry mustard 2 tbsp chopped cooked bacon 2 tsp freshly ground pepper 1 ...


7

We usually end up sautéing the garlic for 15-30 seconds and then proceeding as normal. If you like the results, keep doing it. That's how we do it - I've never been able to taste even a hint of garlic in a fondue done the traditional way.


7

Normally, you start adding the cheese when the wine is simmering and stir regularly as you add it. If necessary, you can add a tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in some white wine to homogenize the mixture.


6

There are many ways to fondue. I like Escoce's chocolate answer. Really, you just need any liquid in which people can dunk their food. Cheese is a popular choice because it goes well with so many foods, but you have a whole world of other options. I went to a fondue restaurant once and they had pots of oil, broth, wine, etc. available for guests to cook ...


6

The magic is from Sodium Citrate Most mass produced cheese it based on "cheddar blends". Basically large (50 Kg to 1 Mg) blocks of cheese are made in a milk factory. When a consumer product is to be made from it, the cheddar is shredded, flavour and/or culture is added, and then using heat and pressure it is re-packed into consumer sized packages In some ...


5

The advertised reason is that the alcohol will cut some of the protein chains resulting in a fondue that is dippable and not so stringy. Obviously the alcoholic beverage of choice will also add a lot of cheese-compatible flavor as well. Fondue recipes that don't include alcohol universally call for acid to achieve a similar effect.


5

Any white with a sufficiently high acid content. The canonical fondue wine is Fendant, which is made in the valais region out of chasselas grapes, so any chasselas (see Wikipedia for a long list of alternative names) will work well. One notable alternative is a dry champagne. This will make your fondue very light and fluffy, due to the carbonation.


5

Vacherin, Comté or Emmental, I wouldn't go for Gouda, it's not cheese from the fondue regions. But it's maybe worth an experiment ;) Don't forget you can mix cheeses, 1/2 Gruyere and 1/2 Emmental for example,


5

I would use this broth to make soups. It would make a great base for a number of soups such as scotch broth, but also for using for the stock for making other soups such as lentil or whatever you fancy. Good luck!


4

In New Zealand we made fondue moitié-moitié with mild white Cheddar and Gouda. Very creamy. I think you can make fondue with almost any meltable pure and good cheese, if the original ingredients are unobtainable. More important is the dry wine, a little starch, garlic and pepper. A shot of a good hard liquor also adds flavor. Kirsch (cherry schnapps) is ...


4

The short answer is: you cannot get the butter out. The milk solids from the butter will be throughout the mixture, and the sheen on top may not be just milk fat from butter, but some cocoa butter as well. Even if you do try to skim the butter off the top, the remaining chocolate will never have the same quality as it did before. Some options: Reheat ...


4

Unlike the other answers, I'd completely skip the part where it has to work like fondue. It's more important that it matches the food you already have. You already have bread and white wine. Have some slices of bread ready, add some grapes and nuts, something to put on the bread (thinly sliced smoked bacon?) and self serve salads which some of the other ...


3

IMO, Unless you have extra fondue "setup", it will be hard to accommodate your friend. You could do a Chinese "hot pot" (hot broth) with thinly sliced meat (beef, chicken...) You could do a fondue "Bourguignone" (with oil) with cubed meat (mostly beef).


3

Two more tips for good fondue's I've made without gruyere: Spicy fondue with ginger Blue cheese fondue (generally made a but softer with mascarpone) & white wine. Excellent for dipping dark brown bread and grapes.


2

Try fontina and truffles for an Italian Alpine fondue.


2

You could try making Vietnamese Pho, a meal which is basically Noodles, Spring Onion and Meat of some sort (perhaps what you have left over from the Fondue) and Stock.


2

Your family will notice if you try to "Pull it back to edible" (that sounds disgusting). Maybe use something a little more acidic next time, like a dry wine, or just a touch of lemon (not much!) if you insist on using beer. It does sound like the heat was a little too high though if you're getting the infamous ball-o-cheese fondue, so turn the fire down, ...


2

I suspect that your cheese curdled. This happens to me if I overheat the mixture- especially in the presence of acid. (I don't have any experience with using beer.) The cornstarch is there as a safety net to prevent this but obviously it is not infallible. Turn down the heat and try adding a little more corn starch- it may not get back to perfect fondue ...


2

White wine has a pH of 3 to 4 and is acidic enough to curdle milk and the milk proteins in cheese. The key to success is to choose a wine that is not too "dry", heat it first to drive off the volatile acids and then gradually add the grated cheeses while stirring constantly. If the cheese curdles you're done. I've never been able to reverse it. Start over.


2

Cheese sauces will curdle more easily if they are not acid enough. I struggled with homemade mac-n-cheese until someone pointed this out to me. The wine that Zippy suggests is one solution to adding acid without undesirable taste.


2

Chocolate fondue would be great to offer AND many of your other guests may end up on the chocolate fountain instead of the cheese.


2

In my experience, the lowest setting of my induction cooker - 120 watts - is too high and results in scorched chocolate and will also burn dairy products like a cheese sauce. I wouldn't use it for a fondue - I would use a candle. It's possible this restaurant had specialty induction cookers that could reach lower temperatures. My single-burner el cheapo ...


1

You can either maintain the heat level through a heat source served with the food at the table or you can add a neutral-tasting oil to the chocolate mixture such as canola(rape seed) or vegetable oil. Adding another fat will also help in preventing scorching of the chocolate. Also the addition of some dairy to create a chocolate "sauce" can be a solution ...


1

While I am not certain if any of these ingredients were in the brand of cheese you bought, I figured you may be interested to hear that according to Heston Blumenthal there is two ingredients, in addition to cheese, you need to make a good fondue. One is acid, which will keep the protein from "clumping together", in the recipe I saw he used a bit of white ...


1

You can use it like normal bouillon. For example you could put it in the water for boiling pasta or rice.



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