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18

It seems to be an edible lichen. It looks very like one described online as (black) stone flower in English and dagad phool in Hindi, which seems to be a not uncommon ingredient in various spice mixes; e.g. on the left in this photo from an Indian food blog: [Edit: photo removed as I’ve just realised the author of that blog specifically requests not ...


14

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


10

That's not batter, that's yeast dough. It is called Мекица (transliteration: mekitza) in Bulgarian, Google Translate says the Serbian word is Колачи (transliteration: kolachi), which I find somewhat strange, as in Bulgarian, колачета is a different food. Maybe somebody can supply the correct Serbian word (or affirm that kolachi is correct). In itself, it is ...


10

That is Classic Series Guava Candy made by HongYuan. You can buy a 14oz bag on Amazon, here.


10

"高麗" is the ancient name of Korea. However, "高麗菜" (where "菜" means vegetable) has nothing to do with Korea, but just how people call cabbage in Taiwan and Fujian. (It's unclear why people use this phrase.) The making process involve drying the cabbage leaves in the sun, so it's called "乾" (in simplified Chinese "干"), which is the name of the Sky in the ...


9

The bone structure is an excellent clue -- each of these three cuts have completely different bones -- and you should be able to learn to distinguish the muscle structures easily as well. (There's almost certainly a price difference, too -- I'd expect a shoulder steak to be the cheapest, followed by leg, then loin and rib.) I've made some quick structural ...


9

I'm serbian and KOLACI means cake in Serbian. What you are looking for iz MEKIKE in balkan countries and it is called USHTIPAK plural: USHTIPCI in SERBIA


9

Those are the chicken oysters -- muscle meat, not organ meat. I'm glad you've learnt to enjoy them by intuition, as they are indeed a prized portion of the chicken. Wikipedia tells me the French call this portion sot-l'y-laisse: "(only) a fool leaves it there", because it is little known, easily missed, and much prized.


8

This spice is called "Kalpaasi" in Tamilian cuisine. I use it in my chicken gravy, mutton gravy and for few vegetarian recipes too. I use kalpasi when I season some of my chutney varieties. It releases a strong curry smell the moment you add it in hot oil. This spice grows inside water wells absorbing pure air (from what I heard from my aunt when I was ...


8

This is definitely a rapa whelk. These are indigenous to the seas in the far East, but got somehow imported into the Black Sea and overtook the ecosystem. First, people around the Black sea didn't have much use for them. The waves washed the shells of dead whelks ashore and these got crafted into souvenirs for tourists. Then, people started fishing them ...


8

Bamboo isn't a tree, it's a grass ;) A bamboo shoot is just the budding new bamboo that's harvested before it grows and becomes hard and stringy. Bamboo shoots are generally available in 2 forms, fresh and canned. Fresh ones are sold whole and generally used in stir fries. Canned bamboo shoots are precooked and packed in water. You can find canned bamboo ...


7

They look like a species of whelk, which is a catch-all term for sea-snails. See the Wikipedia article here.


7

Are you sure it was not in fact a puffball fungus? There are some varieties that are edible and can be found in grocery stores. Depending on how fresh, and when they were picked, they could easily be mistaken for a root vegetable. Look for pear shaped puffball here for an example. http://www.wildernesscollege.com/edible-wild-mushrooms.html


7

Just found out from a friend..its also called Kalpasi or Kallupachi (literally Stone Flower / Moss) in Telugu and is a not so commonly used spice in Chettinad cuisine. So, probably it is not the very generic garam masala (which is more common in the Northern part of India than the South) but something very specific to use in certain dishes, say like the ...


7

Pretty sure it is pigs blood. its commonly used in south east asia countries and hong kong.


7

It sounds like you are looking for Pisang Ambon, a banana liqeur, which is seethrough and green. It is popularly served over ice, mixed with orange juice for a Tutti Frutti kind of drink. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisang_Ambon


6

I've now found them on sale in a posh supermarket in Skopje, Macedonia. This time labelled: потекло скопско пиперки везени благи / кг Which Google Translate massages into: origin Skopje peppers embroidered mild / kg So an answer is "пиперки везени" or "embroidered peppers", for at least one name used in at least one ...


6

Those look like jujubes (not to be confused with the candy). They're also known as Chinese dates, and are frequently found dried.


6

It's probably a Cottage Loaf. It used to be common in England when there were independent bakeries. It's not seen so much now.


6

From what you describe it sounds like čvarci. In the U.S., especially in the south we call them cracklings (or cracklin's). Basically it is what is left from cubing pork fat and rendering the lard out. Makes a quite tasty snack and from what I read was/is a popular delicatessen snack in some areas of Canada. We often make this with fat from a ham or salt ...


5

I was able to track down the dish. It is called Lahuhe. There is a picture of it here: http://pickuptheforkbuenosaires.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/mg_5093.jpg?w=640&h=426 Thank you to everyone for trying to help me out.


5

I think it is a fruit called Chambakka. There are a few recipes for chambakka achaar, which means pickled chambakka. But I would try this chambakka jelly recipe. It looks delicious!


5

This is an edible lichen which is commonly used in Indian spice mixture especially curry masala. I am using this everyday in my kitchen. it gives a very pleasant smell to the curry. About 100gm of this lichen is added to make 750 gm of curry masala powder. Around 10gm of curry masala powder is added to one liter of curry (this is apporximate quantity but it ...


5

It sounds like it could be a Nashi pear. It is something between an apple and a pear and is crunchy and rather dry.


5

I'm from the garden/landscape section of the site, but post your question there anyway, regardless of my answer - you may get a better/different one! Navel oranges, technically, are parthenocopic, which means they produce fruit without fertilisation, and that's why they are seedless. However, if the blossom is pollinated by a suitable donor, then seeds may ...


5

To me, it looks a bit like a birdhouse gourd, albeit a different variegation. Or perhaps a kabocha squash, which to me has a rather mild and mediocre taste and texture. I guess you've ended up with some wacky gourd hybrid, resulting from open pollination of your desirable (F1?) hybrid. As is the nature of hybrids, the result could be caused by pollination ...


4

The Serbian term is mekika (singular) or mekike (plural). This simple food is made from yeast dough - you just deep-fry pieces of it in a pan. The size and shape depends on the person who makes them. As mentioned above, there is another, very similar dish called uštipak (pronounced as "ushtipak") . The only difference between the two that I can think of is ...


4

My best guess would be wampee fruit - has roughly the same size, shape, and stem colour, and obviously comes from the same region, although I'm not sure about the interior: It's hard to tell from the low contrast in the photo but it could also be loquat, AKA "Japanese Plum". Only problem with the second choice is that loquat usually has full-on brown ...


4

The fruit from the Cucurbit family (pumpkins, squash, zucchini, melons, gourds etc) are all very good at cross pollinating. This will create some very strange fruits. I have accidentally grown all kinds of odd things. I would imagine that they are more common at markets & places where people sell produce grown on smaller (than commercial scale ...


4

That's a cue ball zucchini. It's similar to a one ball zucchini (yellow), and an eight ball zucchini (dark green, almost black). All of them are round and great squashes to stuff and roast. Hope you enjoyed it!



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