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67

In Germany we have an old (joking) saying that roughly translates to "head off, tail off - bunny", so your question is legitimate. But first things first: There is no health risk involved if you ate the latest shipment of "meowling rabbit". (To cat lovers everywhere: This is no endorsement, I have a much loved and pampered cat, too!) Obviouly the most ...


35

In the textbook Text-book of meat hygiene: with special consideration to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection of food-producing animals (Edelmann & Eichorn, 1908), pages 64-65 concern determining the difference between a cat and rabbit: The following differences in the skeleton are especially to be mentioned: The lateral processes of the lumbar ...


27

The simplest way to tell the difference is to look at the ribs. Cats have one pair of floating ribs, but rabbits have three pairs. The floating ribs are the ones at the bottom (i.e. towards the tail), that are not attached to anything at their outer end. All the other ribs are either attached directly to the breastbone, or to the cartilage that extends from ...


18

It seems to be an edible lichen. It looks very like one described online as (black) stone flower in English and dagad phool in Hindi, which seems to be a not uncommon ingredient in various spice mixes; e.g. on the left in this photo from an Indian food blog: [Edit: photo removed as I’ve just realised the author of that blog specifically requests not ...


15

This is actually the Turkish method for making coffee, or a variant of it. Coffee grounds, cold water and sugar are brought just to a boil several times before being poured into small cups. For this method one typically uses the finest possible grind of coffee. The sand is used to control heat. The pots (called cezve) on top of the sand keep warm, and when ...


14

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


11

This is definitely a rapa whelk. These are indigenous to the seas in the far East, but got somehow imported into the Black Sea and overtook the ecosystem. First, people around the Black sea didn't have much use for them. The waves washed the shells of dead whelks ashore and these got crafted into souvenirs for tourists. Then, people started fishing them ...


10

That is Classic Series Guava Candy made by HongYuan. You can buy a 14oz bag on Amazon, here.


10

That's not batter, that's yeast dough. It is called Мекица (transliteration: mekitza) in Bulgarian, Google Translate says the Serbian word is Колачи (transliteration: kolachi), which I find somewhat strange, as in Bulgarian, колачета is a different food. Maybe somebody can supply the correct Serbian word (or affirm that kolachi is correct). In itself, it is ...


10

"高麗" is the ancient name of Korea. However, "高麗菜" (where "菜" means vegetable) has nothing to do with Korea, but just how people call cabbage in Taiwan and Fujian. (It's unclear why people use this phrase.) The making process involve drying the cabbage leaves in the sun, so it's called "乾" (in simplified Chinese "干"), which is the name of the Sky in the ...


9

I'm serbian and KOLACI means cake in Serbian. What you are looking for iz MEKIKE in balkan countries and it is called USHTIPAK plural: USHTIPCI in SERBIA


9

The bone structure is an excellent clue -- each of these three cuts have completely different bones -- and you should be able to learn to distinguish the muscle structures easily as well. (There's almost certainly a price difference, too -- I'd expect a shoulder steak to be the cheapest, followed by leg, then loin and rib.) I've made some quick structural ...


9

Those are the chicken oysters -- muscle meat, not organ meat. I'm glad you've learnt to enjoy them by intuition, as they are indeed a prized portion of the chicken. Wikipedia tells me the French call this portion sot-l'y-laisse: "(only) a fool leaves it there", because it is little known, easily missed, and much prized.


8

This spice is called "Kalpaasi" in Tamilian cuisine. I use it in my chicken gravy, mutton gravy and for few vegetarian recipes too. I use kalpasi when I season some of my chutney varieties. It releases a strong curry smell the moment you add it in hot oil. This spice grows inside water wells absorbing pure air (from what I heard from my aunt when I was ...


8

Pretty sure it is congealed pig's blood. It's commonly seen in SEA (South East Asian) countries and Hong Kong. It is used as an ingredient in some dishes and in Malaysia, I have seen it been used in soup as well as soup based noodles. One way to identify them is that they are always sold in cubed form. update: sometimes, chicken blood is sold/used in the ...


8

Bamboo isn't a tree, it's a grass ;) A bamboo shoot is just the budding new bamboo that's harvested before it grows and becomes hard and stringy. Bamboo shoots are generally available in 2 forms, fresh and canned. Fresh ones are sold whole and generally used in stir fries. Canned bamboo shoots are precooked and packed in water. You can find canned bamboo ...


8

The easy way is to look at skull, paws, and tail - but these are normally removed! Cat have short paws, long tails, and a sleeker skull Hares have very long rear legs, easy to spot Rabbit have curved lower leg bones (tibia and radius?), shaped like this () Cats generally have quite straight lower leg bones, shaped like this V. The are nearly touching ...


8

The main differences I see in the skeletons of the two animals is that the cat's humerus (large single bone in the front legs) and its radius/ulna (smaller dual bones in the front legs) seem to be very close in length, or the single bone is slightly longer. The same goes for the hind legs, where the femur (single bone) and the tibia/fibula (dual bones) are ...


7

Just found out from a friend..its also called Kalpasi or Kallupachi (literally Stone Flower / Moss) in Telugu and is a not so commonly used spice in Chettinad cuisine. So, probably it is not the very generic garam masala (which is more common in the Northern part of India than the South) but something very specific to use in certain dishes, say like the ...


7

They look like a species of whelk, which is a catch-all term for sea-snails. See the Wikipedia article here.


7

Are you sure it was not in fact a puffball fungus? There are some varieties that are edible and can be found in grocery stores. Depending on how fresh, and when they were picked, they could easily be mistaken for a root vegetable. Look for pear shaped puffball here for an example. http://www.wildernesscollege.com/edible-wild-mushrooms.html


7

I've now found them on sale in a posh supermarket in Skopje, Macedonia. This time labelled: потекло скопско пиперки везени благи / кг Which Google Translate massages into: origin Skopje peppers embroidered mild / kg So an answer is "пиперки везени" or "embroidered peppers", for at least one name used in at least one ...


7

Those look like jujubes (not to be confused with the candy). They're also known as Chinese dates, and are frequently found dried.


7

It sounds like you are looking for Pisang Ambon, a banana liqeur, which is seethrough and green. It is popularly served over ice, mixed with orange juice for a Tutti Frutti kind of drink. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisang_Ambon


6

I was able to track down the dish. It is called Lahuhe. There is a picture of it here: http://pickuptheforkbuenosaires.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/mg_5093.jpg?w=640&h=426 Thank you to everyone for trying to help me out.


6

It's probably a Cottage Loaf. It used to be common in England when there were independent bakeries. It's not seen so much now.


6

From what you describe it sounds like čvarci. In the U.S., especially in the south we call them cracklings (or cracklin's). Basically it is what is left from cubing pork fat and rendering the lard out. Makes a quite tasty snack and from what I read was/is a popular delicatessen snack in some areas of Canada. We often make this with fat from a ham or salt ...


5

I think it is a fruit called Chambakka. There are a few recipes for chambakka achaar, which means pickled chambakka. But I would try this chambakka jelly recipe. It looks delicious!


5

This is an edible lichen which is commonly used in Indian spice mixture especially curry masala. I am using this everyday in my kitchen. it gives a very pleasant smell to the curry. About 100gm of this lichen is added to make 750 gm of curry masala powder. Around 10gm of curry masala powder is added to one liter of curry (this is apporximate quantity but it ...


5

It sounds like it could be a Nashi pear. It is something between an apple and a pear and is crunchy and rather dry.



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