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Why dont you try to add some alcaline salts to the syrup formulation? That way the sacarose inversion would be impeded.


3

Just to provide an official source, the USDA's National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF) says this: Question 4: What minimum time/temperature parameters for hot holding would ensure food safety? . . . For non-continuous temperature and time monitoring, a minimum hot holding temperature of 130 degrees Fahrenheit ...


0

Boil your jarred chili sauce in the oven with the lids on at 270°C until the liquid boils. Watch it doesn't boil over and make sure you raise the heat gradually to save the jars from breaking. Do this for 4 minutes at 270°C and then place the jars in the fridge immediately. This sucks the tin lids down onto the jar. The chilli sauce lasts 3-4 months. Once ...


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I am trying to think of anything that would refute this notion, but I cannot -- there is no reason you should not be able to hold a liquid at those temperatures for an indefinite period of time. So long as you are reconstituting the mixture with water that is not contaminated, and doing so slowly enough to drop the temperature of the system below 130F, you ...


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I really like Joe's answer. My preferred method for long term storage of any kind of pepper is to freeze it. But, in every case I can think of (that's a lot), the peppers benefit from being roasted and peeled before freezing. Thick walled peppers do well roasting in the oven or charred on the gas stove; then steaming loose the skins by putting the whole, ...


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I grew a lot of scotch bonnet pepoers and my neighbor suggested freezing them whole. When I am ready to use then in a sause, beans, rice etc., I take out what I need, put them in a plastic bag take a hammer and hammer them until they are crushed. Then you can shake the amount you want into the food you are preparing. I made spaghetti sause the other day ...



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