New answers tagged

5

From a production standpoint, you might actually be better off asking this question on the gardening site. In general, however, for canning purposes you'll want to select a 'determinate' variety -- they tend to have all of their fruit ripen around the same time, rather than having it be spread out across many weeks. Indeterminate tend to be better for ...


1

San Marzano and Viva Italia make very tasty sauces if you grow your own, and boil down the seed-strained mash using only the ripe fruit. It doesn't take many green ones to make the taste too sharp.


2

Simple: you can freeze it. Nut milks, especially homemade versions, can be frozen successfully. It doesn't seem to be a recommended practice according to commercial producers, but I would guess that's more to do with the emulsifiers and thickeners (typically lecithin or xanthan gum) used to improve the texture of commercially produced nut milks. Assuming ...


8

If the tea was distilled water, a 5% solution would have been sufficient. That is, you'd need 50 grams of acid to 950 grams of water. The problem is, the impurities of the water and the tea itself buffer it somewhat, so it's impossible to predict the exact amount you need. You'll have to use a pH meter, and an accurate one, not strips, to make a pH solution ...


1

Couple notes: Moisture; biggest enemy; you need to make sure popcorn is dry and cool before packing. Use coconut oil; something in the oil seems to prevent popcorn from going stale. Packaging; I like to use large glass jars for saving popcorn. Air tight is a must.


9

I found this very informative article from the Crown Prince company, an anchovy canner and distributor. Apparently the reason for cold storage has to do with the preservation process and product quality: Anchovy Handling Anchovies are a "semi-preserved" product. This means that they are not sterilized by either cooking or pasteurization. Instead, ...


1

The popcorn's problem is effectively staling -- and a sufficient coating will help to prevent this problem. You may need to add the caramel at a low enough viscosity to get a good coating on the kernels. You can always give them a second coating, if necessary. It's also worth nothing that many of the places that sell packaged pre-popped popcorn tend to ...


8

All anchovies I have ever seen in cans or jars are shelf stable. There is no reason to sell them cold unless there is a consumer preference for them to be sold that way. I have never seen canned or jarred anchovies in the cooler (US). There may be brands sold elsewhere that are not shelf stable, but they should be labeled as such, particularly since canned ...


1

I don't think a spoonful of sugar, honey, etc added to a loaf to encourage the yeast will make much of a difference. Sugar can act as a preservative but only at pretty high concentrations, and the amount you use in bread isn't going to be high enough. My experience is that home-made bread will get stale long before it gets moldy. I've seen supermarket bread ...


1

Ketchup keeps because it is full of sugar (reduces water activity) and vinegar (acid, keeps microbes and especially molds at bay). A boatload of both. Look at a ketchup recipe for reference...


3

Just to add another element to Jefromi's excellent answer, have a look at the table on page 16 of this source. (It's from the same website that one of Jefromi's sources comes from, which is a great resource for food safety information in general, with documents mostly written by an expert with numerous citations to the food safety literature.) Anyhow, that ...


6

As a starting point, I found this article, which says: The suggested temperature specification for refrigeration of foods has been revisited from time to time as knowledge and technology have advanced. Initially 7°C (45°F) was considered the optimal temperature; however, technological improvements have made it economical to have domestic refrigeration ...


0

As sushi rice is marinated it can not be kept for more than few hours regardless of refrigerator. Japanese do not keep sushi rice, and even supermarket sushi has about 4 hours best before.


0

Freezing is a great way to preserve food for many months, but not for any longer than 1 year to prevent freezer burn or moisture and flavor loss. It is a good idea to prevent bacteria growth by only reheating food once, so avoid keeping any leftover reheated soup by refreezing or refrigerating. Freezing in small batches, and reheating for that meal can ...


-3

Let me start with the answer-direction 1) For household purposes (your data), the difference between four and eight degrees is small; 2) That makes it likely that the differences are trivial as well. Any scenario: Germany started at eight, and kept it at that. France started at four. Holland followed france, because they made cheaper fridges etc etc. or ...


1

It works best if you use the tuna first and make a salad which you can store, but what I do and it works very well is to find a bowl that is almost exactly the right size for the amount of tuna, but still large enough for there to be just a touch less tuna than the bowl can hold. Then cover the tuna with plastic wrap and push the wrap down onto the tuna so ...


0

I think four hours out of the fridge is no problem at all. You can always isolate the lunchbox with a towel, to keep it cool, but given that there are millions of japanese that do exactly what you are planning to do, and given that they are alive and kicking, even that seems unnecesary..


2

At the very least, transfer to a food storage container (smallest possible) and cover...for more than a day or two, Ziploc bag, with as much air removed as possible (use water displacement method)...or vacuum seal.


-1

Citric acid is a natural preservative, 1tsp er quart of liquid to preserve the final product. As to allergies listed very little http://www.ehow.com/how_6315775_use-citric-acid-preservative.html


1

If your primary motivation is food safety, then you shouldn't keep rice at room temperature for extended periods of time. There are some people who say that leftover rice shouldn't be kept at all, because there's a risk of Bacillus cereus multiplying between the time that you cooked the rice and got it chilled down. As such, you should cook your rice, cool ...


2

This is something asked very frequently on a canning site I am on and the answer is always a resounding NO. There is NO way to make pickled eggs shelf stable. To preserve eggs however I have heard that dehydrating them can work. Regarding the pickling, the chances of growing and subsequently eating Botulism is rather small but as it is a deadly neurotoxin ...



Top 50 recent answers are included