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2

I really like Joe's answer. My preferred method for long term storage of any kind of pepper is to freeze it. But, in every case I can think of (that's a lot), the peppers benefit from being roasted and peeled before freezing. Thick walled peppers do well roasting in the oven or charred on the gas stove; then steaming loose the skins by putting the whole, ...


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I grew a lot of scotch bonnet pepoers and my neighbor suggested freezing them whole. When I am ready to use then in a sause, beans, rice etc., I take out what I need, put them in a plastic bag take a hammer and hammer them until they are crushed. Then you can shake the amount you want into the food you are preparing. I made spaghetti sause the other day ...


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~~ Vacuum canning is probably the most practical approach. The jars in the photo below are a half gallon in size. And, of course, the sizes just go down from there. This pretty much limits you to the use of Ball mason jars though. But you could carry some of their lids around for awhile (just the disks) and see if somewhere you can come upon some ...


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I've made a bunch of wasabi for sushi and kept leftover wasabi in the fridge, and I can say: your wasabi will definitely lose some of its pungency as time goes on, and will even develop some off bitter flavours. The question is, how important is it to you to have pungent, fresh wasabi? If you're just looking for a kick in your sushi rolls, I don't think ...


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This is actually quite a good question, and I think one you can only answer it properly if you have actually tried it yourself, so it would be nice if you can post your findings in a months time :-). Here is my take on this, and also some considerations: I would actually try to vacuum pack it rather than using an airtight container. There are always some ...


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I would say you could use it once, and probably just to make refrigerator-type, quick pickles. The problem is that you have no way to determine acidity or salt levels once you remove the previously pickled items. Of course it should look clean and clear. If you were previously doing a lactic acid fermented pickle, some of the liquid could be used to jump ...


1

First suggestion Fill the bottles with clear resin. I used this many, many years ago at a church camp where we made our own keyrings by surrounding a small object with clear resin. I remember it as being reasonably straightforward. Google returns lots of how-to videos for using it. I don't imagine it will keep the food for a long period, as biological ...


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None of the classic food preservation techniques will work for you. They are about having the food stay edible, not stay beautiful. Most fixation solutions will work, but you probably don't want to keep them around your house. For example, if you filled the bottle with formaldehyde, it will not only be a major problem should it break in an accident, but ...


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You will want to freeze them as quickly as possible to prevent large ice crystals from forming in the cells. Let them sit in the refrigerator for several hours so they get really cold, then put them in a disposable cooler with some dry ice for an hour or so. Male sure to put the lid of the cooler on loosely to prevent explosion. When completely frozen, move ...


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Okay. You don't want them to lose their shape or flavor when thawed. I don't know of any way that is possible. Fruits that contain a lot of water are going to be mushy when thawed. No matter how you do it. No exceptions. The only suggestion I have for you is to maybe dehdrydate them for future use and then they can be rehydrated. That's not a great ...


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Being an elderly man who has frequented a bar or two in his day I must say that I have never seen pickled eggs, pickled pig's feet, pickled bologna, or any of the other pickled delights that beer drinkers are prone to nibbling on kept refrigerated. In days of yore many bars advertised free lunches of such goods with the purchase of a beer or two. The ...


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Don't lose sight of fermentation as a preservation process. It is the method used to make Tabasco sauce, for example.


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I think freezing is the option . I have tried it and it doesn't affect the texture and taste when added to food.


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The big problem is touching the bread with your fingers after it is baked. Your finger will put mold spores on your bread. I have made bread that will last 3 weeks in my tropical climate by the following procedure: Add 1 gram of calcium propionate to one kilo of flour. Your bread might rise a little slower but you can not taste it. When the bread is ...


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Freezing You can freeze hot peppers. Scotch Bonnet and other thin-walled varieties freeze particularly well, although thick-walled ones can be frozen as well. I think the recommended storage time is 6 months, but I know I've had ones that were fine after a year or so. So long as you're going to be using them in slow cooked applications, you can just drop ...


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Does the quality degrade? Yes, yes, a thousand times yes. Garlic (like onions and other members of the allium family) begins to undergo chemical changes the moment you cut into it. It's the same phenomenon that causes you to tear up when you cut into an onion. Quoting liberally from Wikipedia's article here... The phytochemicals responsible for the ...


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Preservatives traditionally have been Salt, Acid (vinegar, etc), Salt Peter (Potassium Nitrate, KNo3, never look up how this stuff is produced) Vegetetable preservation usually relies on first 2, but meat usually involves all 3 for a real long term storage solution. You can use the first 2 to cure pork belly, but it won't last as long as bacon. The ...


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Personally I would think that it would lose a bit of it's bite after a week. A day or two I would not be worried about it. This is totally a personal preference for fresh garlic though, I have not done any sort of tests. To be honest I don't really cook things that require just garlic sauteed so I would always want to do it then with whatever should be ...


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Meat spoils because it is packed with water and all the nutrients microorganisms crave. To make meat not need refrigeration you have to make those things unavailable. Dehydration is essential. Salt is also helpful. Salt the meat heavily and dehydrate it on a fan or in the oven. You end up with jerky which, if sealed from humidity, will stay good ...



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