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3

The easiest and best solution for the problem is to not dissolve it into water in the first place. Powdered sweetener keeps indefinitely. Dissolved sweetener falls smack in the middle of FAT TOM, so you have converted a shelf stable food into an unstable one. Assuming that you want to keep it at room temperature, there is not that much you can do. You can ...


2

Basic answer: it's generally recommended to sterilize jars before storing low-acid foods at room temperature. (Many canning procedures effectively sterilize the jars during processing.) In your case, you should be certain the jars are clean and thoroughly dry as well. Regarding your overall proposal: I'd only give away food gifts like this if I had ...


0

I recommend pasteurizing the sauce first. Read about it online. You need to get the temperature right for a moment and then put the sauce in glass jars to cool. (Like good old jam containers) Pasteurized sauces would have a shelf life of about three months if refrigerated. Also it depends on how sterile the jars are. Also you need to treat the jars with ...


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I think that the best way to remove seeds when you prepare berries jelly is to use a sieve. But be aware that metallic sieves can alter the acidity of berries, so use a nylon sieve... for more info: http://italianscookitbetter.com/tip/the-right-sieve


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An additional note: The cooking process is pretty much the same for jam, jelly, marmalade, preserves & conserves. It is the preparation of the fruit which makes the difference in the final product.


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From Gregory McNamee's article VQR: Jelly is mostly made up of gelatin, pectin, or some other gelling agent that is added to fruit that has been cooked until it is soft and its solids have been strained out, often to transparency. Jam is cooked like jelly, but the fruit solids are pureed or mashed and kept in the mixture. Preserves similarly ...


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The bacteria that cause spoilage can tolerate salt concentrations up to 7%, while the desired lactobacillus strains prefer a 2 to 3% range. Therefore the correct amount should be used. Above 7% the food would simply be preserved, without pickling. When it comes to pickling the purpose of the salt is to draw carbohydrates from the vegetables in order to ...


-2

I believe adding a little rosemary would preserve this longer. Rosemary if put in slightly spoiled egg or potato salad can actually reverse the spoilage.


6

This is generally referred to as "lacto-fermented" mayonnaise. The whey is assumed to have active bacteria, and most recipes insist on a room temperature rest for at least several hours. During this time, I suppose the assumption is that the bacteria from the whey will ferment and produce sufficient acidity to act as a preservative (as in sauerkraut or ...


3

I haven't seen proof but this isn't plausible to me. The way to make mayo last longer is to make it more acidic- per this question. Notice that many recipes call for mayo to rest at room temp for an hour or two to let the high acid kill salmonella before it is refrigerated. Vinegar or lemon juice are usually used in Mayo and they have pH levels of around ...


1

This is wrong. There is no food safety rule saying that mixing yogurt into mayonnaise will make it magically shelf stable. Even though there might be some factual reduction in bacterial growth, it is not enough to assume any change to the usual holding time. I can imagine two sources for the confusion. First, if you add acid to mayonnaise, you can prevent ...


0

I know they say fresh pineapple is better for you, but when I make my fruit salad, which I do everyday and keep for 2-3 days, I open a large can of pineapple chunks in juice, pour into a container, add my apples and oranges, put the lid on, give a little shake to coat my fruit and just use when I want. If I then decide to add some fresh pineapple, I can.


2

Yes, you can freeze cooked chicken, no problem. As long as you follow safe food handling techniques, it is perfectly safe to defrost it for eating later. Since it has already been cooked, you do not need to bring it back up to 165 deg F. Just get it to the temperature at which you want to eat it, and enjoy! Do keep in mind that when you defrost your ...



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