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The recipe you describe is a "wild fermentation" recipe. So, as @Sobachatina said, the bubbles are a good sign, not a bad sign. The strategy with "wild fermentation" is to create an environment that gives "good microbes" an edge over "bad" ones, in such a way that their advantage continues to increase over time. Salt gives the good ones an initial ...


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The stickiness was, regrettably, probably sodium nitrite or a similar preservative. When applied in amounts that don't result in liquid "run-off," it tends to be sticky. I always rinse it off with cold water for aesthetic purposes, but no real precautions are needed.


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There is no expiration date. At most, it would be a 'best buy' or 'sell by date'. See http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/food-labeling/food-product-dating/food-product-dating


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This isn't at all exclusive to eggs, searing off a really cold (fresh, not frozen) steak will get you a tough steak. Unless the recipe depends on the behavior of a protein as refrigerated, proteins are better to work with at room temperature. Think of the egg yolk and white sort of like ice cream; the warmer it becomes, the more distinctly the viscosity ...


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"Denaturing" is when something makes a protein unwind from it's normally stable, coiled state. The unzipped proteins are then able to tangle up with each other. In milk this action makes them precipitate out as the curd. http://www.thekitchn.com/the-science-behind-why-acid-curdles-milk-222962 There are a few things that make milk proteins denature: Heat, ...


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Protein doesn't get denatured by adding citric acid during cheese making, however it makes them "clump" together, hence forming what is known generaly as lactic curd (or in this case it would be "citric" curd I guess). For example in a Crottin style cheese (lactic goat cheese), that's what makes the texture all crumbly by letting the bacteria produce a good ...


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From my experience, sugar syrups don't last too long (a month tops in the refrigerator). You may be able to prolong their shelf life by adding something acidic, or anti-microbial (I think some spices may work) but not by much. As for jams, I don't think it's the sugar that preserves them so much as the acidity or heat from canning/preserving. Sucrose is ...


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Actually, it's a matter of physics. More heat = more energy = all actions and reactions happen more quickly. Freezing slows down but does not stop chemical processes. Those would not stop unless your freezer could chill things to absolute zero. If your food is in the refrigerator, processes take place in a matter of days, because the food is relatively ...


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Most freezers are frost-free, which means that they occasionally cycle above freezing to prevent formation of frost on the walls of the freezer. This makes them easier to maintain but it shortens the storage longevity of the food. This makes products stored in them vulnerable to freezer burn, which is a loss of moisture. It can also cause ice and IQF ...



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