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According to USDA National Center for Home Food Preservation, no: Caution: Do not add noodles or other pasta, rice, flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents to home canned soups. If dried beans or peas are used, they must be fully rehydrated first. From Penn State Extension: ...there are some commercially prepared foods that just cannot be ...


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If the stew is already prepared, you should be able to freeze it with very little problem. I freeze cream sauces all of the time. Individual portions are ideal because they freeze more quickly with less/smaller water crystals. If the stew is not cold already, chill it in the refrigerator before before moving it to the freezer. Breaking, or separation of ...


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We have a coffee tree we have been growing in our sun-room for 10 years. This year after we harvested the coffee cherries and hulled the beans, I decided to try making coffee cherry jelly. I didn't find any good recipes on the internet, so I decided to "wing it" and it turned out fantastic. This is what I did: I had about 2 cups of coffee cherries. I put ...


1

I just dehydrated things for the first time yesterday, mainly russets. I saw something in the instructions about preparing potatoes but neglected to follow through. They were reeeeaaally black. I mean, they brought to mind black mold. But I knew it couldn't be that. They taste fine, but aren't attractive. I'm going to use them as snacks over the coming week. ...


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Traditionally, meats preserved in this fashion were cooked with lots of fat, then the entire dish was cooled quickly to allow the fat to rise to the top and solidify, creating a seal that kept out pathogens. The entire dish, pot and all were then buried in a hole in the yard. Although it is certainly possible to do something similar today, I would ...


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Use lettuce leaf as a bed for each one and could used as part of the presentation, especially if you want to drizzle or serve a dip/sauce.



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