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Much of it has to do with how you store it, and what the issues are in your area with that storage method in the given season (is it going to go stale before it goes moldy?) I find that the bread that's least likely to go off before I get to the end of the loaf is sourdough ... but I get my sourdough from a place that uses a real starter, and isn't just ...


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Because of time considerations ? I made a 1 and 1/3 recipe last night which seemed to work well even though I accidentally made a couple mistakes (like I forgot to put in the last 2/3 cup of sugar & mixed half a pkg of 1 brand pectin with an eyeballed "half" of different brand that I had just bought...etc.) Larger scaling, like double, I have never ...


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There are microwavable (non metallic) retort pouches designed to withstand 130 degrees C which exceeds the required temperature for full sterilization in an autoclave / pressure canner or perhaps even a pressure cooker. These effectively become MRE's once they've been processed properly. You will need to ensure thet the cold point within the pouch reached ...


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I agree with Jay. If you live in a hot city (with temperatures above 30°C), I wouldn´t keep it out of the fridge more than a couple hours. Otherwise they should last at least five hours at room temperature.


10

Here, check this out. This is an article explaining at length how to make perfect French fries. How to make perfect McDonald's style French Fries So basically, you have to cut your fries so that they are 1/4 inch thick an then blanch them in boiling vinegared water (1 tablespoon per quart of water) for about 10 minutes. This has to be done to keep the ...


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(disclaimer: I've only heard of people doing this, not done it myself.) Yes, it can be done. You're looking for retort pouch canning. Various places will sell you the bags, and you can vacuum seal them with a chamber vac, though you may need an upgraded heat bar. Then you can process them in a pressure canner (or preferably autoclave). I'd definitely ...


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Note that in pressure canning (and regular canning) the material in the jar BOILS, and the lids vent excess pressure, then seal as the jar cools. A sealed vacuum bag would presumably burst, as it has no relief mechanism (which the properly tightened canning lid does, even if many are blissfully unaware of it.) As such, I don't think this it at all ...


2

I'll add to what Jefromi said. I think you're going to have a hard time finding a heat sealable bag that can handle 252F in a pressure canning process. A quick look at mylar bags and HDPE shows a melting point of right around 250F. I'd be afraid they would leak or leach unpleasantness into the food. There should be a process for this because you can ...


1

The safety of pressure canning depends on reaching a sufficiently high temperature (generally 240-250F), holding it for long enough, and having a good vacuum seal in the end, and using a trusted recipe that's actually safe to can with that process. The jars typically used aren't magic, they're just something that can take those temperatures and reliably ...


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It is impossible to answer this. Normally, food is quite clearly divided into the categories of "perishable" and "shelf stable", with perishable food being safe for 3-5 days in the refrigerator and shelf stable food being safe indefinitely prior to opening. Refrigerator pickles are one of the very rare cases in the middle. They are not shelf stable (else ...


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The recipe you describe is a "wild fermentation" recipe. So, as @Sobachatina said, the bubbles are a good sign, not a bad sign. The strategy with "wild fermentation" is to create an environment that gives "good microbes" an edge over "bad" ones, in such a way that their advantage continues to increase over time. Salt gives the good ones an initial edge--...



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