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6

In most countries string beans and green beans are exactly the same thing (see wikipedia's entry for green bean). They are both words used to refer to various unripe cultivars of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris. The phrase string bean is older and dates back to when beans had a fibrous string down the pod that you could peal off. The first stringless bean ...


6

This is generally referred to as "lacto-fermented" mayonnaise. The whey is assumed to have active bacteria, and most recipes insist on a room temperature rest for at least several hours. During this time, I suppose the assumption is that the bacteria from the whey will ferment and produce sufficient acidity to act as a preservative (as in sauerkraut or ...


6

Mothballs work by sublimating (evaporating) a toxic substance into the air. That substance, be it para-dichlorobenzene or napthalene, recondenses on whatever else is in the area around them, and makes those objects toxic to moths etc. However, the sublimation takes a long time. You can leave mothballs in a closet for months, and still not see very little ...


6

According to research conducted at the University of Idaho and published in 2014 in the journal Food Protection Trends, there are now consumer guidelines to process garlic (and certain herbs) safely through acidification before adding to oil. I would read the first link thoroughly to understand the necessary process. To ensure safety, follow the steps ...


4

What you're describing sounds normal to me. It's the result of overcooking them. The eggs themselves were fine. At a guess, you unknowingly messed up the timing for the particular batch described here (alternatively, the eggs may have been smaller than usual). Over cooking hard boiled eggs will result in the smell you identified (and also cause the ...


4

The whole point of canning is to produce food that won't spoil. The only reason to boil canned food is if you think it was improperly canned, and if that's true, it may not be safe to eat even if boiled. Botulism bacteria, for example, will grow in many improperly canned foods, and it will not be completely destroyed by boiling, though most of the botulism ...


4

Where did this urban myth start? Storing a cup upside down has few real advantages. The usual story is that it prevents cockroaches from crawling all over the cups. If this is the problem, then why don't people store their plates and bowls upside down, which roaches etc would definitely crawl over. I might be wrong, but, my experience is that roaches that ...


4

It is safe to eat? Almost certainly, especially if you bake it. Your dough doesn't contain anything that will "go bad" in 15 hours at room temperature. Many bread dough recipes containing only flour, water, salt, and yeast are left to proof at room temperature for 12-24 hours, though they generally start with a much smaller amount of yeast. Could it "go ...


3

I haven't seen proof but this isn't plausible to me. The way to make mayo last longer is to make it more acidic- per this question. Notice that many recipes call for mayo to rest at room temp for an hour or two to let the high acid kill salmonella before it is refrigerated. Vinegar or lemon juice are usually used in Mayo and they have pH levels of around ...


3

This article indicates that the elevated temperature would retard staling, It has been shown that changes in the starch contributes about 93, 50 and 20 percent of the total crumb firmness at 20°C, 30°C and 36°C, respectively, during five days of storage. The results imply that changes in the starch in the crumb are about one-half and one-fourth ...


3

The StillTasty link you give for the sausages is for all types of fresh, raw sausages, not just pork. That's why it's labeled "SAUSAGES (INCLUDING PORK, BEEF, CHICKEN OR TURKEY) — FRESH, RAW". Most likely, they're getting the 1–2-day limit from the chicken sausages (which are likely to have a higher initial bacteria load than pork or beef). Note that they ...


3

You have to wash cleaners off, there's no other way to remove the dirt. The gunk is not going to magically evaporate, you will have to wipe. If your fridge is really dirty then I suggest a tub of soapy (dish soap) water, a sponge to clean and wipe, and a towel to dry. If it's not that bad then a kitchen safe spray cleaner and a sponge or paper towels will do ...


2

I've cooked lots of meat in my President's Choice rice maker, which comes equipped with a steaming tray. The rice cooks for about 50 minutes, and if it senses there's extra water or moisture in there, it will keep extending the time by 1 minute. I have literally thrown entire 1.5" thick pork chops in there, chicken leg quarters, a small sirloin roast, all ...


2

Yes, you can freeze cooked chicken, no problem. As long as you follow safe food handling techniques, it is perfectly safe to defrost it for eating later. Since it has already been cooked, you do not need to bring it back up to 165 deg F. Just get it to the temperature at which you want to eat it, and enjoy! Do keep in mind that when you defrost your ...


2

You know I attended the BBQ Camp at Texas A&M, which was sponsored by Foodways Texas and conducted by the faculty of the Meat Science Department, and the first module of the workshop was food safety. One of the faculty discussed an experience he had when he was invited to a friends house for dinner. His host made steaks on the grill and carried the ...


2

Basic answer: it's generally recommended to sterilize jars before storing low-acid foods at room temperature. (Many canning procedures effectively sterilize the jars during processing.) In your case, you should be certain the jars are clean and thoroughly dry as well. Regarding your overall proposal: I'd only give away food gifts like this if I had ...


2

I would assume that it's for safety reasons. Not yours only, but the manufacturers' as well. At the plant the manufacturer can control the environment and make sure that the product leaves in a condition that should last for a certain time under specific conditions ( e.g. when refrigerated). Subtract a bit for safety and you have the manufacturers ...


2

Summary: If the loaf is kept at an elevated temperature in a plastic bag for a period of 6-12 hours I believe you will see little to no difference compared to storing at room temperature. Stored at an elevated temperature in a paper bag the loaf will start to dry out to a noticeable extent. Note that the answer below does not address possible food safety ...


2

Poke the dough with a floured finger. If the indentation stays behind with no spring back, it's over proofed. With that much yeast, probably about 4 or 5 hours. Contrary to popular belief, a long, slow, cold prove is actually better in terms of flavour and texture than a fast one. You control the speed of the prove with the amount of yeast and the ...


1

I can't advise on any of these, so I'd normally put this in a comment, but it's a bit long. Searching on 'how to cook avocado seeds' found a few articles on the topic: http://www.livestrong.com/article/31737-eat-avocado-seeds-nutrition/ : calls for grinding it in a 'powerful food processor' and warns that it might damage lesser ones. ...


1

This is wrong. There is no food safety rule saying that mixing yogurt into mayonnaise will make it magically shelf stable. Even though there might be some factual reduction in bacterial growth, it is not enough to assume any change to the usual holding time. I can imagine two sources for the confusion. First, if you add acid to mayonnaise, you can prevent ...


1

Most things probably just fine. Some have a fairly strong odor that could be transferred to some foods. Would probably throw out bread. Would also throw out moths. Even a few hours exposure might damage them to the point where they won't have that fresh moth flavor.


1

There are specialized "fridge cleaners" in the drugstore, but if you take a look at the ingredients list, you'll find out that you are paying lots of money for a small amount of alcohol and tensides. You can follow GdD's advice and use soap, then wash it off, then wipe it dry Other cleaners such as window cleaner can also be used, they are safe enough - ...


1

Assuming food-safe seeds (are there basil seeds that aren't?), yes it is safe, both to drink the water and to eat the seeds. That's the point. Just now I have been experimenting with different ways to drink soaked Sacred Basil seeds. Other types of basil seeds seem to work just the same way, as evidenced by the results of an Amazon search for "basil seeds ...


1

If the basil seeds are safe, the water should be also safe. If you have food-grade basil seeds (i.e. non-teated seeds) and didn't soak them for too long (so pathogens had enough time to grow), this should be safe. I think soaked basil seed last as long as soaked chia seeds, 2 weeks. There are even desserts / drinks with basil seeds and the water in which ...


1

Some people don't want to put the part of the glass your mouth touches on the possibly dirty cupboard bottom. Let's assume that the insides of your cupboards are clean enough (you have no mice, rodents etc) that this is not an issue. Further, let's assume that you have cupboard doors and the aforementioned lack of vermin, so worrying about dust and pests ...


1

Flavored oils are a low-acid anaerobic (no air) environment. Herbs add a moisture source and can allow botulism bacteria to grow. Even if herbs are removed from the oil after infusing for a brief period, they may have already contaminated the remaining oil with botulism toxin and/or allow small pieces of herbs to remain where the bacteria can grow. ...



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