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10

I have a similarly hairy hand/arm issue. I scrub my hands and arms quite roughly with soap, hot water and scouring pad prior to any prep. In an effort to remove any lose hairs before giving them a chance to get in any food. Suffice to say I've never noticed any hair in any of my food. Gloves may help stop any hand hair's getting in there but I can't see how ...


9

Reusing deep frying oil is fine (up to a point - you can't refry indefinitely), and in fact the flavour often improves with use. You should be absolutely fine frying two turkeys one after the other for Thanksgiving. Have a good one!


8

To add in to @Doug's answer, Chef garbs may also help, with the long, loose sleeves. The fabric is usually a bit rough which may help catch some of the hairs. Here is an article about it: http://www.primeskills.com.au/blog/a-clean-chefs-uniform-a-clean-professional-kitchen/


8

Great question. First off, the mold. This is nothing to worry about, you should be skimming it off but as far as Vinegar creation it's normal and to be expected. These "worms" have a name :-) Turbatrix Aceti (a.k.a Vinegar Worm) you can read more about them here -> wiki/Turbatrix_aceti Why is that mold there? Well if you think about the fermentation ...


7

This is a basic fact of food safety. It doesn't matter how long each of the ingredients take to go bad separately. Prepared food will go bad soon unless you do something special to preserve it. In your case, you had hazelnuts, which don't go bad because 1) they have too little water, and 2) bacteria cannot enter their tissue, which is made of intact cell ...


6

This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


5

Generally speaking you can serve pheasant a little pink, but not as rare as you can duck. This is more a textural thing than a safety thing though, I believe. Pheasant is quite lean so cooking it completely makes it very dry. Cooking any meat anything less than well done is technically 'risky'; you have to weigh the risk with having an enjoyable meal. ...


5

There is no conclusive reason to say about safe or not either way. When an egg is frozen, the yolk changes irreversibly. Even after thawing, its consistency is very different, much thicker than normal. On the other hand, it may never have been frozen, but have been contaminated by something instead. Or it may have been frozen first and contaminated ...


5

Phew, too long for a comment. The liquid of (young?) coconuts is sterile and can even be used for transfusions. The abstract of the linked article doesn't say anything about the sterility of older coconuts. I assume that the older coconuts (esperically the peeled ones) are not sterile anymore. This not very trustworthy looking website (this article is ...


4

Foil is the way to go, combined with not too fierce a heat. You want to cook at about 160C until the centre of the pie is piping hot. To lower the chances of burning, portion the pie prior to reheating. That way the centre will get hot more quickly. Reheating more than once is generally not a good idea for safety reasons. You can however portion one ...


4

There are basically three primary concerns when cooking your turkey: bacteria, spores, and toxins. Bacteria: As you point out, since your turkey eventually reaches at least 165 degrees, all the live bacteria will be killed. Spores: Some of the bacterial spores will not be killed, which means that as the meat cools, they will have a chance to grow again. ...


3

I cannot comment directly on the broccoli, but I want to point out that this part How big a risk am I taking by just blending frozen broccoli into my smoothies without cooking at all? How likely is it that I get sick and what might be the symptoms? is impossible to answer. This is not how food safety works. Creating a prediction for such a risk is ...


3

You could totally just grate courgette (zucchini) the morning of your lesson. It will be fine, you don't even have to put it in water. Just put it in a baggie. It would be fine at room temperature for several hours, it's not even going to notice two. If you want to grate it the day before, just put the baggie in the refrigerator overnight.


2

Temperature isn't the only factor in bacterial growth. According to Wikipedia: A number of wood smoke compounds act as preservatives. Phenol and other phenolic compounds in wood smoke are both antioxidants, which slow rancidification of animal fats, and antimicrobials, which slow bacterial growth. Other antimicrobials in wood smoke include formaldehyde, ...


2

Play it safe. It has been said: You probably will be ok, but the safer method is just to cook it the night before and refrigerate it. Toss the whole thing in an insulated lunch container, and you should have no problems. Even if the temperature creeps up into the danger zone, it shouldn't be there more than an hour or two before lunch time, and should ...


2

Well, if you don't want to spend a fortune on a Commercial Butcher Shop Band Saw, your best bet is a bone saw. Image from Philly.com Here's one on Amazon. Here's a less expensive one from Cabela's. Here's a fairly reasonably priced Band Saw with Grinder. If I was going to do a lot of butchery, I'd consider that.


1

Last time I tried to re-heat a pie in the oven, even with foil over it, the crust burned and the insides of the pie were still only lukewarm after 10 minutes plus. It sounds like your heat might've been too high, or you put it on grill instead of regular oven elements? Anyway, what I would do is microwave it for part of the reheating time. It helps to ...


1

They are little blood spots, perfectly safe to eat but often a sign of cheap and/or poor welfare birds. As long as you cook it properly (take it to at least 140f) its fine to eat.


1

Cooked food becomes potentially hazardous when it cools and also when it is re-heated from cold. Why one brand would have a food safety warning and another would not, I cannot say. Sometimes manufacturers treat food in other ways (like irradiation) to control possible contamination issues. The temperature at which the broccoli would have been ...


1

I think almost everything that has been cooked previously carries the warning of reheat to 73-76c or 167f. Not just broccoli, it is just the accepted reheat temperature. However if your not heating it at all and it'll stay below 7c you should be perfectly safe :-) Who probes vegetables anyway? 😉


1

It has been said: Better safe than sorry. You haven't measured the absolute sugar or acidity levels. Freezing it will do no harm. – SAJ14SAJ Jan 29 at 1:47 I'm definitely not an expert with baking, but I've worked with fruits in other contexts. The only time I would be worried about freezing would be if I added oil, like for a marinade or such. In ...


1

There is nothing wrong with eating rare meat, assuming the meat is fresh and was handled and refrigerated properly. I have been eating blue rare meat my whole life, and often eat raw beef in sushi or tartar. There is no need to worry. Rare hamburger, on the other hand, can be risky due to the surface area of the meat and the fact that portions of the meat ...


1

What happens if you brine something for a long time depends on the concentration of your brine, much like temperature affects what happens when you cook something for long. Thus, you can apply equilibrium brining and brine your meat for a longer time in a less concentrated solution. I haven't tried it, but according to linked source you'll get desired ...


1

It struck me that THEE one important piece of information that's forever left out of the equation IS that we just do NOT have any perfect way of knowing ENOUGH about any one particular egg. Let's name our RAW egg "Henry-in-the-RAW". (1) How many days was it until Henry-in-the-RAW even got from the "farm" to the market; and (2) How much poop was on him; (3) ...


1

Trichinella only infects about 8 people a year in the U.S., and almost all cases are from people eating under cooked wild boar. Farm raised pork in the U.S. is virtually trichinella free, which is why the FDA has lowered the temperature from pork cooking recommendation from 160 degrees to 145, or medium, with a three-minute rest. Pork no longer needs to be ...



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