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5

In principle, I don't see why you couldn't take the flour to safe temperatures just like any other food. You'd have to reach temperatures which break down proteins, something like 165 F or 75 C should be sufficient (it's good enough for meat). This will break down the proteins in the flour too, so I would expect it to behave like standard browned flour (...


4

You're asking about a few different attributes here: safe/unsafe - food is safe when it's essentially guaranteed not to cause foodborne illness. Nothing is perfect, of course, but if a food safety agency says something's safe, it means there's a sufficiently small chance of illness that they're fine with telling everyone that it's okay to eat. So if ...


3

By the time escargot1 are heated to serve (I presume you had the standard garlic / herb butter gratin version served in the shell?), they have already been cooked for two to three hours in total. Escargot are killed by dumping them in their shells in boiling water, not unlike some cooks prepare lobster.2 The soft body is removed from the shell, inedible ...


3

Ideally you should get airtight containers, but failing that, plastic wrap is indeed a lot better than just covering with a plate. As you say, you'll tend to get more smells mixing around in the fridge if things aren't airtight, and it's something that can kind of build up over time, with the interior of the fridge just taking on a mix of all the smells. (...


2

Does eating raw flour or doughs containing raw flour pose a significant food safety risk (i.e., greater than other dry goods or ingredients in your kitchen)? Yes, as the level of bacteria has not been reduced/killed especially if the dough has been sitting/fermenting and/or contains harmful bacteria. Nb: Most flour isn't washed or treated (irradiated) ...


2

I usually go to CDC for stuff like this: Multistate Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O121 Infections Linked to Flour Case Count: 42 States: 21 Deaths: 0 Hospitalizations: 11 Recall: Yes Recall & Advice to Consumers & Retailers The recall page gives use by dates and UPC of the affected batches.


1

Typically if you suspect that a jar is actually contaminated with botulism the procedure is to leave it sealed and throw it away. This is due to the ability of botulism to become airborne. (see: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/identify_handle_spoiled_canned_food.html ) The washing of old gross jars is usually aimed at high-acid foods that may have popped ...


1

I just dehydrated things for the first time yesterday, mainly russets. I saw something in the instructions about preparing potatoes but neglected to follow through. They were reeeeaaally black. I mean, they brought to mind black mold. But I knew it couldn't be that. They taste fine, but aren't attractive. I'm going to use them as snacks over the coming week. ...



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