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16

Still tasty implicitly says that the sauce stays indefinitely technically edible. The expiration date is only for quality purposes. I think the sauce probably doesn't have an expiration date but rather a "Best By" or "Best if Used By" date. Storage time shown is for best quality only — after that, the sauce's texture, color or flavor may change, but ...


11

Do as others do and use a camping stove. They come as gas stoves like this one or even as wood- or charcoal-fired versions (see here). Perhaps an avid camper among your friends could even lend you one, means you'd only have to buy the fuel. But before you do this check with the local authorities / people responsible for the event whether they are ok with ...


11

Unless you're planning to consume a few kilo of each of them in one sitting, I would say you're being too cautious. Tomato, bell peppers, chilis and potatoes are all part of the nightshades family, and are toxic to some degree. But the poison is in the dose. The amount contained with in the vegetables would mean you'll have to consume an inordinate amount of ...


6

Doesn't seem like it to me. I have a bottle in my cupboard from 1997 and it's still fine on the (very) rare occasion when I actually put any on my rice.


5

It depends. Are you talking tamari, shoyu or western soy sauce? Good tamari will improve with age (which is why I buy it in 5gal quantities even though I use far less than a gal/year). The same is probably true of shoyu as well, but westeren soy sauce has additional ingredients which may affect shelf life.


5

You need a Thermete (Storm Kettle in North America). This would match the vintage theme Larger ones have taps near base, and can boil 10 cups of tea in a few minutes These were coveted by construction and rail road worker gangs, as they could have a 10 minute break for a cup of tea and a biscuit (cookie in North America), including the time to boil the ...


3

In general I agree with the excellent answer by Willem, but when it comes to potatoes it does make sense to cut off any green parts. There have been quite a few stories about people eating green potatoes, and it's not pleasant. When it comes to tomatoes, though, it looks like the green bits are safe to eat. Harold McGee pronounces the tomato leaves safe to ...


3

I seriously doubt it. The expense and complexity of making sure there are NO pathogens in a random sample of food would be significant. And then that would be all you'd have; a statement that the tested sample had no pathogens, but who knows about the rest of the food. Testing food in a manufacturing plant depends on the commonality of how the food has been ...


3

While legal specifics vary from place to place, the "best before" on a product is often a requirement, but exactly what it is is left up to the manufacturer. In other words, they have to provide one, but it can be anything they want (there may be rules about guaranteeing nutritional content for the duration, if that is subject to degradation). So ...


2

According to this article, button mushrooms may turn a pink color if bruised while being stored or handled. This sounds very much like what has happened to you, as you've stated that the mushrooms were old and not stored properly. This is not poisonous or bad to eat by any means, but I understand that one would not want to take the risk, especially when it ...


2

Bread is a shelf stable food. lasts indefinitely food safety wise, and this has nothing to do with preservatives. It is simply dry enough to last. So the date on it doesn't matter. We throw out bread when it's too hard to bite into, or repurpose it for something else (breadcrumbs). The exception is when it's stored under somewhat humid conditions. Then it ...


2

Very unlikely. Cans are made from either steel (uncritical) or aluminum (dito), covered with a thin layer of tin (dito) or epoxy coating. These materials are explicitly choosen because they are food-safe1, even at higher temperatures than you use with home cooking: Tin cans are sterilized after filling to make the food inside shelf-stable. So the only way ...


2

If your event is (a) outdoors (b) in a warm climate... you could have some fun with (and attract a fair bit of attention to your booth..) with a solar heating method. There are several videos available online to show you how to do this, one example is from the king of random but a quick google search will reveal many ways boil water.


1

Is it mold? It definitely is. Whatever happened to it, it is bad. Are the batch and mother salvageable? I wouldn't think of that for a second. The mold is everywhere. Just get rid of it.


1

With all cooked, perishable food the total time in the so-called "danger zone" 40-140 °F / 4-60 °C must be minimized to avoid growing bacteria and thus food-borne illnesses. (Your transporting plans place your dishes flatly in the danger zone, so not a good idea.) If your kitchen is on site, this is typically done by keeping food hot between cooking and ...


1

I wouldn't eat it if I were you. I don't think it is safe to eat if it is 6 years out of date. I recommend you to throw it and make another one with new ingredients.


1

Duck eggs have a heavier, more waxy coating on them than chicken eggs do. Duck eggs must be more resistant to bacteria in moist environments since they are much more likely to be exposed to it than a chicken egg is since, in nature, the duck spends much more time in the water. A heavier, more waxy coating means less evaporation and less chance for bacteria ...



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