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29

What you're looking at is called (in the US) "cross contamination". You have a food generally considered "unsafe" (beef) that is coming into contact with a food generally considered "safe" (salad greens). This contact makes the greens "unsafe" to consume raw. Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting ...


15

No, it's not safe to eat those greens without cooking, for exactly the same reason it's unsafe to eat the meat that's touching them without cooking it. If you have to cook the meat before eating to make it safe, you would have to cook anything it's touched to make it safe. Maybe it's not quite as risky as eating the meat, but it's still risky. They could ...


4

I agree with the comment by Richard ten Brink: you can't really do this in a home freezer and expect good results. Even with a large home chest freezer, it will take way too long for a whole carcass to freeze all the way through. Freezing requires a lot more energy than maintaining something that's already frozen, and the process for a pig carcass would ...


3

The main problem I see is humidity - the bench flour can be lumpy, have bits of dough in it and will be partly moist. I would therefore not put it back in the main bag of flour. If you use it like flour, it might leave dry lumps, so it depends on your technique whether it will work or not. But there are techniques in bread baking that use leftover dough or ...


3

A major reason produce can be sold loose without tongs is that you're supposed to wash it just before preparing it anyway. You couldn't wash your baked goods. How effective this washing is, is of course another matter now we don't have to wash the mud off and a token rinse is probably typical. Some produce, including mushrooms but also strawberries etc., ...


2

I think it may often just be fat/protein slime. Unfortunately, that's going to be hard to distinguish safe fat/protein slime from bad bacterial slime, so this is probably yet another time where you'll have to use your best judgment. If it's well before the sell-by date and has been handled properly, it shouldn't have dangerous spoilage. There should ...


2

It is safe to drink the tea made from tea leaves and it's safe if you eat the tea leaves themselves at the bottom of the cup. People avoid eating the leaves because they aren't pleasant tasting, the consistency isn't very nice, and they aren't that easy to digest.


2

No, definitely not. It's not possible to safely preserve meat by boiling alone. The only way to do this kind of thing at home is with a pressure canner, which lets you reach higher temperatures to properly kill everything dangerous. See for example the NCHFP advice on canning meats.


1

There isn't anything special, there is no reason they should be treated any differently than other exposed and handled foods. It's not the food that is dangerous, it's the human based disease that is spread by food handling that is the issue. I don't advocate gloves in food handling, I advocate good hand washing. Gloves make people sloppy and I think it ...


1

Yes it is normal. The salt (and sugar) will "extract" the water from the fish meat. [...]On a technical level, what both the salt and sugar do is draw moisture out of the fish through osmosis. This decreases the moisture level of the fish, which in turn makes it less hospitable to microbial life. The salt, meanwhile, also helps ward off bacteria that would ...


1

A line of approach: You could prove it by finding the actual water content of the Ganache vs. the sugar content. The cream is cooked down somewhat similar to what happens when you do Dulce de Leche; and is turned to syrup. High sugar products (candies, candied fruits) are relatively stable at room temperature (between 15c and 22c, according to wikipedia) ...


1

The answer is related to a similar issue appearing in this question. Basically, that residue is mostly water, along with denatured proteins from the meat. When meat is cooked and the cells expel moisture, there are a lot of dissolved proteins which sometimes make the liquid light-colored and thick. People tend to notice it more with certain meats than ...


1

If you ever spent time in a hospital setting, you would have been instructed to place cups/glassware right-side up in cupboards to prevent contamination from germs. It makes sense. You put your lips against the rim, but never ever lick the bottom of a cup or glass.


1

You did not mention whether the restaurant was committed to serving meat from free-range chickens. The living conditions can have a major effect on the meat produced. I raise my own chickens, and I discovered that there is almost no "white meat" on a very active chicken. White meat is a product of inactivity. The more the muscles are used, the more blood ...



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