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62

General comments on the shelf-, fridge-, and freezer-life of foods The shelf-life is the amount of time a food can be stored before it is considered unsuitable for use. It may be unsuitable due to quality degradation (no longer tasty) or food safety (risk of food poisoning). [1] As far as food safety goes, food stored frozen at 0°F (-18°C) or below is ...


58

Not safe enough for me to try it. Potatoes actually contain a very dangerous toxin called solanine. This toxin is concentrated enough in the green parts in the plant to cause solanine poisoning. This includes the sprouts/eyes, and the potato itself if it's green. This article from the New York Times health guide indicates that it is something to be taken ...


53

Back in the 70's, the folks at Mother Earth News performed an egg storage experiment. They stored them in a variety of ways, both refrigerated and unrefrigerated, to see how long they could keep. They concluded that unwashed eggs (aka, "hen fruit" or "cackleberries") stored in a sealed container, and kept at 35° to 40°F, were still perfectly edible after ...


39

I've always understood the problem to be that you're heating up the refrigerator, which may be unsafe for the other food in the fridge. For the food you're cooling, it's not a problem.


38

First, do not eat that. Regardless what color the beef is, two weeks is entirely too long to refrigerate ground beef. It is unsafe and should be thrown out. Raw ground beef only keeps in the refrigerator for 1-2 days. Ignoring storage time, regarding color, brown meat is as safe to eat as red meat. As others have indicated it is simply oxidation occurring. ...


38

It's perfectly safe to cook it, as long as you don't plan to eat it. The exception is if the water was at or below fridge temperature to begin with. When food temperature enters the "danger zone" of 40-140F/4-60C, there's a lag time of 2 hours before bacteria go into exponential replication. Any longer, and the bacteria counts start to increase ...


37

I might disagree a little with rumtscho - traditionally cured bacon is one thing, what you get in packets from the supermarket is another. It looks similar and it tastes similar, but commercial products are processed rapidly and not tested for immediate consumption without cooking. Products like Parma ham and Schwartzwaldschinken are proven to be adequately ...


36

Time to apply a bit of healthy skepticism here: The blog post: Is (so far) the first and only one I've ever seen stating mold to be a practical problem in coffee - in the sense of being present in a high enough quantity to matter (mold grows everywhere). Uses all kinds of weasel words to describe symptoms ("edgy", "cranky", "useless mentally"). Describes ...


34

Yep. Rotten eggs float, fresh eggs sink. This is because eggshells are porous, so over time water vapour and gases leak out, reducing the egg's mass. A fresh egg will lie on its side on the bottom of a glass of water. The older the egg, the more it sits up, until it's floating.


34

Chicken juices contain a soupy mix of proteins including haemoglobin (which gives blood its red colour when mixed with oxygen), and some myoglobin (which gives red meat its red colour when mixed with oxygen). Up to about 140F, they are unchanged, but heat them to between 140F and 160F and they lose their ability to bind oxygen and so their colours change. So ...


32

I think it would depend on the cheese. For a reasonably hard cheese, like cheddar, I have done it, and never gotten sick (your results may vary). If it's pre-grated, then I would not touch it anymore. For a softer cheese, like a brie, I would not risk it.


32

hobodave's answer is most of the way there but I think it understates the importance of protein toxins. With the vast majority of foodborne illnesses, the bacteria aren't particularly harmful at all; what you need to worry about is the protein toxins they produce. E.Coli - probably the most well-known form of food poisoning along with Salmonella - is ...


31

Two problems Hot or warm food will briefly warm up the air and therefore to some degree the food already in fridge, especially items immediately near it. Cycling temperatures does not help fresh food quality or life. Modern fan forced fridges may suffer this problem less It is very power inefficient to do this, just let it cool on the bench until it ...


30

A lot of bacteria grows in the range of 40-100F (i.e. room temperature). It's definitely not recommended to defrost meat at room temperature. In fact, you are not supposed to leave meat at room temperature for more than an hour. However, defrosting in the refrigerator can take a long time and require you to plan at least one day ahead of time. I'm not so ...


30

Steps to put out a grease fire Turn off source of heat (burner / element) Do NOT pour water on it let me say that again, Do NOT pour water on it Attempt to remove all oxygen from the flame. You can cover with another pot, or baking pan If you can't cover it, dump baking soda on it. (lots of it) Secret step number 6, if all else fails, use a fire ...


29

I'm not going to comment on whether or not it is safe, because that could be any number of issues other than the brown coloring of the meat. However, the brown in and of itself is not an issue. When meat is exposed to air it turns a brown color. This does not effect the falvor of the meat, but the color turns a lot of people off. Grocery stores will actually ...


29

If you're at all like me, you are reassured by hard numbers and measurables. This should help. In this situation one of the likely pathogens would be one of the Salmonella species. Salmonella is killed by temperatures in excess of 130 F (55 C). However, it's not an instant death. The time to kill Salmonella decreases exponentially as the temperature ...


29

In such a case, for any food item, ask yourself a question: In a 19th century household, would it have been kept in the cellar, or eaten immediately? For bacon, it is common knowledge (or at least I think everybody knows it) that it was kept in a cellar for long time. So this is definitely not a food which perishes too quickly. You can eat it raw. (In ...


28

It is safe to eat a sprouted potato if it is still firm (source: University of Illinois); however, don't expect it to act the way an unsprouted potato would. Part of the starch will have converted to sugar. Be sure to store potatoes somewhere cool and dry with good air circulation. Also, keep them away from onions.


28

It is absolutely OK to filter and reuse deep-fry oil. It's not uncommon at some short-order restaurants for them to filter the oil daily and only change it once a week. Of course, it does start to taste a little "off" when you reuse it that many times. There's also the matter of impurities lowering the smoke point; even when you filter, the result is ...


28

As a health inspector for over 20 years, I am astounded by the lack of awareness that food safety controls are based on science and not on individual inspectors' personal fears and bad moods. Botulism control is based on some of the following facts: botulinum spores are commonly found in soil and on vegetable surfaces, botulinum grows in low or no oxygen ...


27

You don't really need a lot of tasting spoons, just one. Use your stirring spoon to pour some into your tasting spoon without touching. Or if that's too tricky, serve a bit onto a small plate/bowl. But if you're just cooking for yourself I personally wouldn't really worry about it, because in general you'll be cooking the food at a safe temperature, not ...


27

It is absolutely untrue and very dangerous to think that "if it looks OK, and smells OK, it must be OK." If that were the case, food poisoning would be very rare. Food that we can sense is spoiled rarely causes illness. For one thing what you don't eat can't hurt you and people generally won't eat food that looks or smells spoiled. But less obviously, much ...


26

If you want to cool food down quickly, just use a cold Bain Marie; Put cold water in the sink (for instance), add some ice, then add the pot you are trying to cool down. Stir. You can keep on adding more ice as needed.


25

Capsaicin is oil/fat-soluble so try washing your hands with a little whole milk, or rub with sour cream or vegetable oil and see if that helps. Just as you can get it in your eyes if you rub them with your fingers, I'm sure you can easily transfer it to your baby. I'm just surmising here, not speaking from experience so if you try any of these, be sure to ...


25

I find when cooked, the skin retains a bit of bitterness and toughness, so in desserts, juices or when shaved/julienned , I'm inclined to peel them. In fast salads, quick application, I usually don't bother.


25

Let's call a spade a spade: if you're in one of many areas where people don't eat vegetables raw, it's because nightsoil or unsterilized animal manure is used to fertilize the fields. A quick rinse won't render these vegetables safe to eat, because you need to kill the pathogens. To start out, you should wash all dirt and sand off produce; for this wash ...


25

It is perfectly safe to eat (when produced, transported, and so on under sanitary conditions, just like any other edible meat). In some cultures it is considered a delicacy; in others, it is not considered appropriate to eat, but those issues of cultural norms, not of safety. The news is because it is a violation of trust (truth in labeling) in a ...



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