Hot answers tagged

7

Step 1 should always be to ask which ingredients exactly you need to stay clear of, just in case it's more than nuts. My - possibly naïve - assumption would be that basic recipes that stick to flour, sugar, eggs, butter and possibly dairy should probably be ok. Chocolate could be dangerous as the factories often use nuts as well, so there is a risk of ...


6

Not really. Assuming that the pizza has been cooled down and stored properly (for which see here and here) then it most likely won't have developed a potentially harmful microbial load. Additionally, while reheating might kill off most of the microbes in the food (assuming that you reached and maintained a temperature sufficient for pasteurization, which ...


6

From what I can tell from the picture, most of the white stuff is flour; it was likely like that when you bought it, but only you & your memory know for sure. The non-bread & non-white occasional spots in the picture appear to be the olives. Overall, unless you spot obvious mold, which is more often green than white, I think you are OK to consume ...


6

There's no rule that you have to drink your wine 24 hours after un-corking it, in fact some wines can taste better after 24 hours. 3 or 4 days is fine in many cases, and some wines are still drinkable a week after opening. This can be extended by refrigerating your wine after opening, white or red, you can get 2 weeks out of a bottle of wine if it's stored ...


5

Use the fact that you have two hands*. If you don't want to pre-mix your spices, open all containers you intend to use. Assign one hand to be the "clean" one, one the "contaminated" hand. Use the clean hand to shake or pinch spices or salt from their jars (onto the other hand, the meat or your work surface, depending on your preferred method of ...


4

I am afraid that gloves make things worse. Even with proper training, people who wear gloves seem to be more complacent that those who do not wear gloves. I have seen people handle dollar bills then turn around and touch my food with the same gloves on. Disgusting, and I refuse the food, and when I tell them why, they say the gloves are to protect me...what ...


4

I make kimchi regularly. It sits on a shelf at room temperature for a week or more, and slowly ferments. Some people ferment it for months. Sure, it likes a low oxygen partial pressure, but a few hours on a bus isn't going to hurt it.


3

The standard metric for safety is the cumulative time in the 'danger zone' temperature of 40 to 140°F. Which we really don't know, as that would also include things like bringing it home from the store and stuff like that. From the sounds of things, you left it out for less than an hour. As such, you should serve it ... but serve it immediately or hold it ...


3

The test of a truly great pizza is how it tastes the next day — cold, right out of the refrigerator. Provided the freshly cooked pizza was not left out at room temperature for an extended period of time; and it's been refrigerated for only a day or so; it ought to be safe to eat. It's a different experience eating cold pizza, but if it was made with the ...


3

The difference between cold and frozen where a refrigerator is concerned is actually only a few Kelvin (or "degrees"). The standard refrigerator will have warmer and colder zones, typically the top shelf being warmer, the bottom shelf above the veggie drawer cooler. Likewise the back is usually cooler than the front. The temperature you set it to is an ...


3

I have experience with a few natural options such as Bred-Mate, Bro-Lite and MoisturLok, but I doubt that any of those will get you as much shelf life as calpro will. MoisturLok and Brolite both have formulations for sweet goods, and I did have luck getting yeast breads to have a 7+-day shelf life with Bro-Lite. If you have access to it, I'd recommend just ...


2

Here in Italy it is normal to buy in the stores cold pizza for eating as snack. Pizza is similar to bread so it should be safe if conserved properly.


2

If your fridge has a meat compartment, that often runs at very slightly above freezing - so slight it would take several days to thaw. In the rest of the fridge, meat frozen to -18C (typical) will still take quite a while. Polystyrene tray packaging (used to be common here in the UK, much less so now) is a good insulator and further slows things down. I ...


2

I rub dry spices, pepper and salt into steaks. Just do it All at once and wash your hands once.


2

Kimchi existed long before refrigeration. Infact the sole principle of kimchi is preservation through fermentation. So yes, you can leave it at room temperature for a few hours.


2

I'd salvage the mother, and start over with a fresh batch of water/sugar/apple. How much sugar did you add? I have a video on making vinegar on my youtube channel, 4godliv. And I've taught two vinegar making classes. Before the mold gets this bad, spoon it out and spray some straight vinegar into the batch, to bring the acidity up. And stirring it should ...


2

Actually, aphids are totally edible. Depending on the plants they've been eating, they can range from slightly bitter to sweet. They could cause problems for your friend's remaining produce, though.


2

You have a sensible approach, and for the right reasons. Food-borne illnesses don't die at the temperature your sink is at, to kill them you'd need water so hot you'd burn yourself, and even anti-bacterial soap would not be good enough to make the water safe. If you chlorinated the water it would be a different story but that's overkill when simply doing ...


2

Most freezers are frost-free, which means that they occasionally cycle above freezing to prevent formation of frost on the walls of the freezer. This makes them easier to maintain but it shortens the storage longevity of the food. This makes products stored in them vulnerable to freezer burn, which is a loss of moisture. It can also cause ice and IQF ...


2

It's really easier to do with icing, but if you make a really pale dough such as a sugar cookie dough, you can color it. I once made pie-chart shaped cookies by doing this, then making wedges in various colors & sizes, then squishing them all back together into a log, and slicing it into rounds. I don't know if it was the colors that I was using, but I ...


1

I have a friend who's fatally allergic to nuts (along with many other things), but she loves making chocolate chip cookies (and eats them). There must be a specific brand of chocolate chips that are nut-free, but it is good to watch out for that as well on the labels. I echo all the advice here from everyone else: ask your friend which exact ingredients he ...


1

It won't be viable to leaven bread. Too soon and you'll just be using it in the leuconostoc stage which is bad bacteria and isn't good for anything. I wouldn't use the starter or discard till it becomes viable.


1

Kraft's website says they pasteurize or heat treat all their cheeses to kill bacteria and they are confident they are safe to eat. That includes their Kraft Parmesan grated cheese in the shaker container sold in the unrefrigerated aisle. Some brands I've seen don't say on the bottle "refrigerate after opening." Kraft does for legal protection, just to be ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible