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46

What most people don't get when it comes to food safety: Spoiled food has a chance of making you sick. When food is visibly spoiled, it has large bacterial colonies growing in it. This means that it has been exposed to conditions which were promoting bacterial growth. Anything which was present on your food will have grown, unless outcompeted by something ...


19

Unless he actually canned the sauce (processing the jars in boiling water bath or pressure canner as appropriate) and was working from a trusted recipe, no, this is definitely not safe. It takes processing like this to make canned goods shelf stable. And the recipe is important too; for example if the pH isn't low enough it's not safe to use the boiling ...


9

I like rumtscho's answer, but feel the need to add to it. Amount ingested is a main factor in if you get sick, so to answer your main question - a TINY bit of bad Ranch Dressing is unlikely to make you sick. A lot of foods are intentionally spoiled - yogurt, buttermilk, cottage cheese, cheese (especially Blue Cheese and the other moldy ones), meat is aged ...


8

This is a reasonably common practice in South Asian cuisine. Some reasonably credibly information can be found in the Wikipedia article on vark. Quoting from the section on safety: Gold and silver are approved food foils in the European Union, as E175 and E174 additives respectively. The independent European food-safety certification agency, TÜV ...


7

I've done it before without problems. Even if they're peanut butter & jelly (something that's typically stored in the fridge), it has so much sugar in it that it's inhospitable to microbes. If you want to play it extra safe, and the sandiwiches won't be easten shortly after you leave, you could place them in the freezer and then let them thaw in your ...


6

Yes, it is safe. It is really more a question of quality. I would suggest that, in your specific situation you get a browning dish. (It would be something that you could still use after your move, if you like.) Please see the excerpt below from this page . There is nothing like a charbroiled steak straight off the grill. But for the times when you don't ...


5

While many pictures show them deep red (perhaps for the dramatic effect?), even orange flesh wih only some red tinge is normal. Even the wikipedia link you gave in the question states: The Moro is a "deep blood orange" meaning that the flesh ranges from orange-veined with ruby coloration, to vermilion, to vivid crimson, to nearly black. The color of ...


5

Yes, you can do that. Simply make sure that the duck isn't at room temperature for too long. 2 hours is the strict limit: you may wish to be more... sensible about it. I'd suggest slicing straight from the fridge, as it will not only be easier to get thin slices when the meat is firmer, but it will also de-chill quicker.


4

While I agree that these types of warnings are conservative and partially CYA, I would suggest that they not be dismissed. What needs to be understood is that there are other factors involved past the production method. Even if a mfr./producer observes and maintains the highest quality standards in their production facility, they have no control over how ...


4

As the comments already cover, thou shalt not trifle with the sanitation department rules if you want to stay in the business. You might try tighter gloves or gloves of different (but still acceptable to the sanitation department) plastics/rubbers, or with different surface textures. Many "food service gloves" seem to the purchased on the one size fits none ...


3

There are also things which can happen to your food which won't cause any immediate symptoms, but which are quite bad for you in the long run. For instance, some molds produce mycotoxins (the most famous being aflatoxins) which can increase the risk of cancer. Apart from this, I believe rumtscho covered the reasons you shouldn't eat spoiled food pretty well ...


3

It depends what's in there; in most cases it's the toxins that make you sick, rather than the organisms themselves, but that's a generalization. Moldy cheese is bad - unless, of course, it's supposed to be moldy, in which case it's good (well, not to me, but to folks that like blue cheese it is...) Bacteria are bad - unless, of course, they happen to be ...


3

I cut it off also. Don't tell your friends you do it. I have heard you can freeze some cheeses, but I think it looses flavor with freezing. flavor is after all why you buy and eat cheese. have more cheese tasting parties.


2

I have read a couple of experiments (in Dutch so I will not link them here) where people cooked the same dish from the same shrooms, with one batch brushed and the other washed. The washed batch did need higher temparature to actually fry, instead of just boiling in their own moisture and the texture in the finished dish remained different. There does seem ...


2

There are some kinds of mold which are safe to consume (blue cheese is a common example) but in general they are not. While you might often be fine eating a bit, there's no guarantee, so to be safe you should throw out moldy food like your jerky. See the FDA's advice, for example.


1

There's a lot of good answers here, so let me focus on the part that's mostly omitted. A huge chunk of the food we eat is spoiled. Intentionally. The reasoning for each is very wide, from preventing harmful spoilage (food preservation), to improving taste, texture etc. The most obvious of those foods are of course cheeses and yoghurts. Even the simplest ...


1

I suppose dropping the bags in liquid nitrogen for a few minutes, and then storing in the freezer might suffice. mostly fish, but not a bad read: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/UCM252416.pdf Edit post clarification of the question: Liquid nitrogen is still fun if you can find an excuse, and highly effective. In a less drastic ...


1

I'd be fine with it. Salt is a preservative, and it was still cold to the touch - not the same as if it had spent 24 hours in a 70 degree F environment, or a 40 degree C environment. The default mantra for this site is to throw everything away. If you or someone you are feeding actually is immune compromised, this makes sense - if not, it's a rather ...


1

What you got is more properly characterized as buttermilk (in the current usage of the term) than yogurt. Pasteurization does not sterilize milk, and it can have been any kind of bacteria which can survive in milk. The process was the same as in any other cultured dairy: bacteria started multiplying, producing lactic acid which curdled and soured the milk. ...


1

Because oxygen is still carried through the packaging, but it doesn't travel very far in the meat. This is normal.


1

The vegetables might be fine, since vegetables can be stored in the fridge for up to a few weeks, depending on the kind. The meat should be thrown out. If you don't know at what temperature it has been kept, and for how long, there is no way to tell if it is still safe, and food poisoning is unpleasant. I would throw everything out, but I strongly recommend ...


1

You will never achieve the same texture and doneness after two hours that you will when your shrimp come out of the fryer...unless, of course, you have access to a CVap oven. The CVap was invented (I believe by Col. Saunders for Kentucky Fried Chicken) to solve the problem you identify. Shrimp cook very quickly, but without access to a commercial ...


1

Yes, according to the common food-handling procedures, having food in the 'danger zone' for some time is bad ... however, you've likely pasteurized your meat, as you only need to hold it at 140°F for 12 minutes to pasteurize pork against its normal pathogens. Mind you, it's more than 12 minutes to get the middle up to 140°F, so it's not simply 'it needs to ...


1

Exactly. No harm will be done and if it was off, the smell would knock you over so you wouldn't dare drink it anyway. This coconut was picked too early, or in the wrong season and so had developed no flesh to speak of. Its very frustrating when this happens as you have usually paid good money for it. In Far North Queensland, Aus, they sell them in the ...


1

I thought everyone peeled mushroom caps with a pairing knife. That's how I was taught to clean them. It's a bit labor intensive, but usually the number of mushrooms used is not that large. Holding the stem with a paper towel usually cleans it, or simply cut the stem and do not use it.


1

Honestly, I would wash them. I don't care if that affects the taste slightly. Eating unwashed fruits and vegetables (especially raw) is a risk factor for many diseases such as listeria, salmonella and toxoplasmosis. Don't soak the mushrooms to wash them, give them a quick rinse under warm water, and use your fingers to clean the dirt off them. Then pat dry ...



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