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27

There is almost no food which is guaranteed to be safe. If it has nutritional value for a human, it has nutritional value for many microorganisms too, some of which are human pathogens. So, out of the FATTOM rule, you can already throw out F: you cannot remove the food. A is also not a good candidate - no food is naturally acidic enough, and while there ...


25

It's safe because freezing greatly slows (if not completely arrests) the growth of the bacteria that would otherwise make the meat spoil. It doesn't kill them, it just puts them in 'stasis'. The expiration date is given based on the meat only being refrigerated. If you intend to store the meat past its expiration date, best practice is to freeze the meat ...


12

Dairy is something of a special case because the natural bacteria in dairy products will tend to outcompete any interlopers...In short you're more likely to end up with a kind of redneck buttermilk (from the action of natural Lactococcus lactis or Lactobacillus bulgaricus) than something that is toxic to you. So unless the milk was already contaminated with ...


9

Since it was unheated, this is definitely a sign of food contamination. Since this had Italian sausage, it is low pH, and could be in danger of botulism toxin. Here is information from the CDC about botulism. If you ate the sauce, I recommend you see a doctor quickly, as it can lead to paralysis. If it had been heated, it could have just been boiling over. ...


6

Picture: Spiritus is a Polish vodka that is 98% alcohol by volume. I should think it is as sterile as it is possible to get. Foods that are very high concentration chemicals are typically poor habitats for bacteria and moulds. Items which are high sugar, high salt, or high alcohol would typically be safe. You probably have pure sugar and salt in the house ...


6

I would...with milk you generally can tell the moment it comes near your nose or touches your tongue whether it's gone bad or not. That doesn't mean I would serve it to others, that's risking someone else's health.


5

As MCheng said that is very likely botulism. You will need to watch for symptoms for 10 days. If you develop symptoms then you need to get medical attention immediately. It doesn't take very much to be in danger so unfortunately even the amount you ate can pose a risk. From the CDC's website: If you develop signs or symptoms of botulism, seek medical ...


4

It should be safe - a couple days in the fridge is not generally a problem. I would be tempted to freeze it again before cooking, just so that it's cooked the way the manufacturer expected. At the very least it'll let you use the time on the package, and it's possible it actually matters, because they're expecting something about it staying cold inside for ...


3

Usually only a portion of the needle of a typical meat thermometer reads the temperature. On some models this is indicated with an indentation on the needle. It is usually near the end, though not always exactly at the end. The thermometer reads the temperature the location of this part of the thermometer. You want to know the temperature at the center of ...


3

The sensor in your thermometer is located at the tip of the needle, so you're measuring wherever the tip of the needle ended up. If the tip of the needle it not touching anything (or is touching the pan or cooking surface) your readings will be skewed.


3

What you have done is fine. Not only are you not facing a safety issue, but because you didn't allow the piece that was to be refrozen to completely thaw, you're unlikely to even face the quality issues that refreezing poultry often sees. (Refreezing poultry tends to play a bit of havoc with the texture) One small thing...our grandmothers rinsed chicken. It ...


3

Cook's Illustrated has tested beer cans enough that it would be totally reasonable to assume that Beer Can Chicken is safe, but if you want to avoid the can without spending money on a special pan, I just thought of an alternative to the beer can. If you have one...take the funnel section from angel cake pan, or tube pan...it fits perfectly! You should place ...


3

This issue has come up in our home. We did an experiment with a frozen homemade and a frozen store bought lasagna. We defrosted both of them for 3 days in the refridgerator. We did this to make the process of heating them easier, as it takes a much longer time to heat them up frozen. They were both approximately 10 pounds each and took an oven each. We ...


2

Your grocery store has it down to a science. To get all parts "done" at the same time, they have to be cut to the right size. Your grocery store does that very well. The marinade flavors all parts, but the marinade doesn't carry flavors much (see here, different but similar: How deeply will the flavors in a brine penetrate chicken? (experiment results)) So ...


2

Far be it for me to give medical advice as I am NOT a doctor, but the likelihood that the mold you encountered was toxic is pretty small and I would not be worried. That said, if you were to start developing any kind of symptom, your best place to ask about it would be your doctor and not on the internet ;) The presence of black mold doesn't guarantee that ...


2

Firstly let me note that I have never prepared this breed so I can't speak from personal experience, just what I've come to hear and see. From what I've learned about silkies they're tremendously different to the regular breed of chicken we're used to. They're not well suited for roasting or frying and should rather be braised or prepared sous-vide (I ...


2

A best before date does not specify how long a food item will last. It merely gives a time frame within which an optimum quality can be assumed ( as given by the manufacturer). Food does not automatically spoil after the best before date, so use common sense. My gut feeling with golden syrup would be that it's fine unless a change in smell, consistency, ...


2

Mascarpone cheese is NOT made with a culture. It therefore needs refrigeration, sealed or unsealed. You really should throw it out.


2

Speaking in general about expiry dates, because I haven't seen them posted in other answers to this or other questions... Expiry dates are (in some jurisdictions) entirely optional for most goods, and determined by the manufacturer (one example, anecdotally). Another recent-ish article, which I found enlightening, from National Geographic that suggests ...


1

14 = day 15 = year It's very unlikely that a can bought in late 2014 would expire in 2014 unless your store is carrying some very old stock. I have seen this type of expiration on other cans and it's been clear that the format is Day Month Year (31 DE 14 or 31 Dec 14). Seems like poor labeling on the part of the manufacturer by not including a 4-digit ...


1

This may guide you a bit. Tl;dr - It recommends reusing brines only for fridge pickles. Since you have already heated up yours to make your original batch, heating it again (and processing it) may change the acidity and make it not shelf-stable. Since there were no vegetables placed in it, it may not have changed the acidity that much, but better safe ...


1

It sounds like something is wrong with your slow cooker. On low, it should hit somewhere in the 190s, on high in the low 200s. On high, I'd expect it to get there fairly quickly—within two hours. Both should get you to 140 within an hour. That said, the actual safety temperature (with a good thermometer) is 130 or 131F. 135 or 140F leave some safety margin ...


1

You're fine. Cheese gets moldy when it goes bad. If it looked fine, and tasted fine, you have nothing to worry about. Cheese is often aged for years upon years, and for safety's sake we say to leave a bit of buffer if you cut off mold from a solid chunk of cheese, the rest is still fine to eat. Of course, if shredded cheese gets moldy, you throw it out, but ...


1

Sure you can keep it indefinitely, this is how bread was made before commercial prepackaged yeast became available in the 19th century. Your dough will turn into sourdough. It can under some circumstances grow nontasty bacteria or mold, but as long as you don't see any mold and it doesn't stink after some time (if it stinks within the first 3 days it's ...


1

A mixture of flour and water at room temperature is a very hospitable growth medium for many bacteria, yeasts, and molds; and indefinitely is a long time.... Even if you are extremely vigilant when it comes to kitchen hygiene, the mixture will eventually start to grow some form of microbes. This process could take a week or more to become obvious. If you ...


1

you will need a pan that is metal with a wooden handle it lasts years and years. I have one with a wooden handle and it is great i have been using it for 20 years now.


1

due to the size of the hole it would be quite safe to drink from a cup where the glazing has warn off however without the glazing and through repeated uses liquid will begin to seep into the material causing it to become more brittle and a potential host for unwanted bacteria, however this could take numerous years for this process to form. the glaze on ...


1

If it were just mold, I would say you could just cut the moldy portions off prior to cooking. The smell, however, tells me they have turned bad. The mold may very well be more extensive than just on the exterior, it has probably penetrated through the stem to the center of the beet. If food ever in any way ever looks or smells "off" don't use it. Possibly ...


1

In any food safety situation you really must ultimately ask yourself 3 questions to determine relative safety: How High of a temperature am I sure I achieved? How long did I hold this temperature? How well sealed is the container? If you are pressure canning, there are reasonably good chances you kept VERY high pressure and temperature. As for time, I ...



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