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9

I found this very informative article from the Crown Prince company, an anchovy canner and distributor. Apparently the reason for cold storage has to do with the preservation process and product quality: Anchovy Handling Anchovies are a "semi-preserved" product. This means that they are not sterilized by either cooking or pasteurization. Instead, ...


8

All anchovies I have ever seen in cans or jars are shelf stable. There is no reason to sell them cold unless there is a consumer preference for them to be sold that way. I have never seen canned or jarred anchovies in the cooler (US). There may be brands sold elsewhere that are not shelf stable, but they should be labeled as such, particularly since canned ...


7

As I explained in another question recently, there is no meaningful answer to this. There is no way to make the prediction "you have a X percent chance of infection per parasite infested meal". Instead of predicting it mathematically, we could feed people infected fish and measure it, but as far as I am aware, no ethical board will approve that experiment. ...


6

As a starting point, I found this article, which says: The suggested temperature specification for refrigeration of foods has been revisited from time to time as knowledge and technology have advanced. Initially 7°C (45°F) was considered the optimal temperature; however, technological improvements have made it economical to have domestic refrigeration ...


6

It's a tradition in Scotland as well. A boiled suet fruit cake Clootie Dumpling is when eaten at Christmas especially has small coins and charms included in the mixture. The mixture is put in a clean muslin cloth and boiled. Although traditionally eaten at Christmas the pudding is also eaten at other times but the coins/charms are only used at Christmas. ...


5

Yes, this is definitely a Greek tradition, a New Year's bread called vasilopita Vasilopita (Greek: Βασιλόπιτα, Vasilópita, lit. '(St.) Basil-pie' or 'king pie', see below) is a New Year's Day bread or cake in Greece and many other areas in eastern Europe and the Balkans which contains a hidden coin or trinket which gives good luck to the receiver, like ...


5

If I eat 1,000 raw chicken breasts, how many terrible nights will I have? Impossible to say. You will ingest many pathogenic bacteria, but nobody in the world can predict how many times they will cause an illness, and in how many of these times the symptoms will be noticeable, and how many nights each case will take until you heal. What is easy to ...


5

I think the times you did it with no troubles you used smaller portions, right? These big portions simply do not cool down quickly enough, and the temperature stays too long in the danger zone, say between thirty and sixty celsius. Bacteria grow very quickly around these temps, and so they spoiled your curries. Their waste is lactic acid or alcohol and ...


4

It would depend on how quickly you use the butter, how thoroughly the pan was cleaned, and how long the pan was stored between uses/washes, and how clean your hands were when rubbing the butter in the pan. The more contaminates you introduce the butter and the longer you store it, the more likely the butter will spoil. Refrigerated butter is good for about ...


4

As long as the eggs aren't expired you should be fine. I've made creme brulee many times with both fresh eggs and not so fresh with similar results.


3

Vacuum sealing food does not make it safe at all. You have to treat it like any other cooked food, only with the added risk of botulism. I was looking into whether your lemons might be acidic enough to be treated as a refrigerator pickle. I could not however find anything to confirm that. Worse, newer studies recommend against previously used "tried and ...


3

There is a similar tradition in Bulgaria. On the Christmas Eve is served Christmas bread with a coin inside it. Then everyone takes a piece of the bread. The one who finds the coin inside his piece will be very lucky and happy during the next year. The Christmas bread can be in different shape with variety of ornaments and symbols. According to the old ...


3

Just to add another element to Jefromi's excellent answer, have a look at the table on page 16 of this source. (It's from the same website that one of Jefromi's sources comes from, which is a great resource for food safety information in general, with documents mostly written by an expert with numerous citations to the food safety literature.) Anyhow, that ...


3

In summary, it's complicated, as rumstcho's answer indicates. And the number of infected chickens/eggs is only the beginning, since chances of illness depend on how high the bacteria count is. There need to be enough to survive ingestion and partial digestion before they can incubate in your body and then cause illness. Thus, to predict chances of illness ...


3

There is a difference between cleaning and sanitizing. Cleaning If you have something greasy on the counter then you need some sort of detergent to solubilize the grease. (You might want to then use a vinegar solution to be sure and get all the detergent off the counter.) If you were doing something like kneading bread, then you need something a bit more ...


2

White vinegar will very effectively clean and sanitize your countertop, and it's completely non-toxic! I keep a decanter on my counter, making it easy to splash some out, and wash down the counter with a paper towel. In addition, baking soda is an excellent scouring powder, and also completely non-toxic. (Baking soda can also extinguish a grease fire, which ...


2

You routinely prepare food on cutting boards which have been cleaned just with soap and hot water, even after being heavily contaminated with raw meat. So thorough cleaning with diluted soap and water should be sufficient here as well. Just make sure that you use the same standards you would for your cutting boards, namely, that you've removed anything that ...


2

Bromine, lead or mercury - all of which you can find in some or the other wood treatment - will still be bromine, lead or mercury no matter how much you burn them, they will just be in different chemical compounds, and a lot of them might get expelled from the oven with the exhaust - but certainly not all, especially in that kind of oven design. And most of ...


2

Last night I accidentally left dinner on "warm" overnight and when I woke up it was at 147F (still with a fair amount of moisture). That was with a 6.5qt "SmartPot" model. Mushy but safe, IMHO.


2

No, it won't melt to the point where it becomes liquid and mixes evenly with the soup. You cannot have consumed a melted top without knowing it. There are very few "everyday" metals which melt at below 500 C. Even tin (which I doubt is actually used for food packaging any longer) needs 231 C, while soup is at 100 C max (boiling point of water). If your top ...


2

cut it they way you want, it does not matter at all, and produce and meat together woud be a mortal sin in the kitchen, but if you have a small batch, store one night, and you will cook them together anyway for hours, I dont see any problem with that either. But why wouldnt you store them separetely? If you cook your produce for six hours with the meat you ...


2

Shiitake mushrooms are certainly not poisonous, either raw, cooked or as you posit in your question, after being cooked, stored in the refrigerator and consumed later. If you enjoy eating them cold, go for it. Just keep in mind that like any other cooked food, they can spoil if not stored properly (I have some leftover Chinese mustard greens stir-fried ...


1

It really depends on how warm the warm setting keeps the food. If it's over 60 degrees Celsius, you should be fine, but for something like pork I would want it to be considerably over that temperature to be on the safe side, and then you're into cooking territory rather than 'keeping warm' territory. You are probably better off cooking the patties, storing ...


1

As far as food safety goes, you are fine: Neither was the fish in the danger zone for the thawing, nor did you store it in the fridge for too long, even considering the second thaw in the future. However, the food quality suffers from each freeze/thaw cycle: Ice crystals damage cell walls and causes loss of liquid, which you then find in the freezer bag or ...


1

I would assume there is enough salt content to render these fairly stable in the fridge. I would just avoid fingers in the jar to avoid any potential surface contamination. In the long run, I would go with whole, salted anchovy, which have an indefinite shelf life. I keep an 800 gram can (opened, but covered with foil) in the fridge, using one or two ...


1

I guess that you heard about the advice not to reheat mushrooms of any kind and thus, to toss the dish if it is not eaten right after cooking (at least I read this advice in a book along with the advice not to reheat spinach and this advice is/was quite popular in Germany). This statement is true if the food will be stored at a place which is not ...


1

Shiitakes are not poisonous and are fine eaten cooked, uncooked, cold, or as leftovers. Poison's mushrooms contain toxins which cause their effects. Some of these toxins will break down when cooked, but there is nothing I can find about the opposite happening (toxins activating when cooked) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushroom_poisoning


1

The reason for keeping meat and veg separate is INDEED to prevent cross-contamination. This is to avoid uncooked Meat juices from spoiling in veg that you are serving fresh or not to meat temps. Further, you can store veg for weeks in a reefer, but if it's been contaminated with meat juice, that's far far too long and unsafe. You are however cooking the ...


1

Would you wash your hands after handing chicken poop? How about if you were digging around in the straw or dirt where chickens live? That's where your eggs come from. Contrary to popular belief, chicken eggs generally aren't contaminated by feces before they exit the chicken -- the two pathways by which feces and eggs come out do intersect near the ...


1

In the UK it's illegal to wash eggs. In the USA, the USDA requires all eggs be washed. So who's right? The incidence of salmonella poisoning due to eggs is actually lower in the UK. Vaccination of the chicken may prevent salmonella inside the egg but the egg will eventually be exposed to the outside world...and salmonella. Currently the US does not require ...



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