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24

Any halfway competent chef should indeed be tasting. The only way to know whether you're putting up good food is to check it yourself - and you'd better be consistent if you want to continue getting paid for it. That's not to say that all chefs do, nor that there's any one standard for how frequently to taste or what method should be used. It's pretty ...


23

Yes, chefs and cooks taste the food they prepare; even an experienced chef will do this, mostly to check seasoning (salt, pepper, etc.). However, most experienced cooks will taste less and will know how to tweak the preparation without having to constantly taste and re-taste. Cooks usually use spoons - tons of spoons - to taste food when they prepare it. ...


11

Certainly cooks should taste their food as they go, especially if they're making something they haven't made many times before. "Double-dipping" is common (even in commercial kitchens). It's the kind of thing a lot of people do, but no one wants to get caught doing it. This question is related: Food safety when tasting from dish, and you might find the ...


5

As I have noted in a couple of other answers, I have worked in the CPG (Consumer Packaged Goods) industry for almost 30 years. It is safe to say that there is not a simple answer to this question. There are so many variables that it would be difficult to even go into all of them. Before I go further, let me say that common sense goes a long way. Most food ...


4

No, your reasoning is incorrect. Food safety rules are dumbed down because they have to be taken literally without any reasoning. if the temperature is very high all the time during that time, I think the maximum time is shorter. The maximum holding time isn't shorter for higher temperatures. It is the time at which food is legally safe, and it is ...


4

Sorry that I can't comment as a guest, since this does not truly answer the question of whether to taste test or not. One can reduce the number of spoons used to taste test by using a system of two spoons; one spoon goes into the dish while the other is tasted from. This way, after spooning from the first spoon to the second, the first can be put in the ...


3

Your assumption that there is nothing living inside the package is incorrect. Food irradiation does not sterilise the food. It is very, but not totally effective. Therefore, given enough time, the meat will still spoil. Irradiation does effect the quality of the food, so I imagine a balance needs to be struck between safety and quality.


3

The recommendations (in the US at least) are based on a risk model, which takes into account a number of factors: frequency of outbreaks and occurrence of illnesses severity of illness, taking into account illness duration, hospitalization and mortality likelihood of contamination growth potential/shelf life manufacturing process contamination ...


2

If you have sanitary concerns about taste-testing, you could do what I do: Use the main spoon/utensil to transfer a small amount to a bowl/plate. Use a second utensil (like a small spoon or fork) to taste from this bowl or plate. This allows you to reuse your secondary tasting utensil without it ever touching your main utensil. If you're really concerned ...


2

According to NRAEF food safety standards, it should be thrown out. Anything that can potentially grow bacteria should be thrown out if it has been left in what's called the Temperature Danger Zone (40-140F) for more than 6 hours. The dairy added to the coffee in question was an ideal culture for bacterial development at room temperature. All things ...


2

"Best by" or "Best Before" usually applies to something that's going to go off in a yucky but not dangerous way. Sour Cream is a good example...It's already off. Off is what you're paying for. It's not going to get more off in a way that doesn't include some pretty disgusting looking mold. Ketchup. It's good for about two years unrefrigerated...You'll know ...


2

Throw them away. I would not expect potatoes to go black in the dehydration process, and although they may be safe to eat I would not expect them to be palatable, or inviting in any way. You cannot be sure they aren't toxic, and you wouldn't put them on a guest's plate, so chuck them.


2

There's no real exact time it happens (at least in my kitchen). I've had some jars that come out of the water with the lid depressed and others that take many hours. By the next morning, they should be cooled with the lids depressed. If they aren't, then they should be reprocessed or refrigerated to be eaten right away. :)


2

Discard the contents of the pan in the trash. Wash the pan with hot water and soap. All will be well once you've done this. There is no reason to be concerned about which particular pathogens you tossed in the trash and washed down the drain. You can safely assume it was a few of all of them.


1

The real goal is for the lid to turn concave. They're manufactured to be convex (sticking up in the middle). If they're concave on the jar, that means there's a difference in pressure between the inside and outside of the jar causing the lid to be sucked downward. If the jar has cooled significantly, and the lid is still convex, you could try pushing down ...


1

The color on the potatoes is attributable to the oxidation that's a natural degradation process. The main cause is the direct exposure with open air but other factors can accelerate it (even the metal on the knife or the food processor's blades in your case). Some vegetables are more susceptible than others (for example, avocados turn black in a matter of ...


1

It depends on how long it's been out. I've seen mold form the second day to "plain" unflavored coffee (no milk, no sugar). I've kept refrigerated brewed flavored coffee in an air-tight container for a week or more without problems. (I add a bit to unflavored hot coffee so the flavor isn't overwhelming).


1

Aaronut's answer is fine, I'm just coming at it from a slightly different assumption. Sandwiches like these are common in gas stations and convenience stores in the US. You can buy them in multi-packs at grocery stores or places like Costco. In multi-packs they are sold frozen, in convenience stores they have often been defrosted. They're perfectly ...


1

Freezing extends the safe storage lifetime of any food. I would have to assume that a frozen sandwich may have been frozen for a long time and therefore probably isn't the best quality, but it isn't any less safe than a refrigerated, "fresh" sandwich - in fact it's probably safer, although the operative word is "probably" - that's not necessarily true unless ...


1

(This probably should be a comment but it's too long) If you don't taste you can end up with something very wrong without knowing it: My mother had allergy issues that kept her from tasting what she was preparing, she was also blind which meant the only labels she could read were the ones she put on things. One day she baked some oatmeal cookies. My ...


1

Working in a professional kitchen where we cooked eggs in various styles. I would say from my experience: Hard boiled eggs will keep for 4 days refrigerated in the shell, before they become unpalatable. Soft boiled eggs(hard whites, creamy yolks) will keep in the shell, refrigerated for 2 days. Poached eggs, properly cooled in ice water and drained, ...


1

Only for your information. The spanish ham can get moldy every time, because the curing process will not stop. And for sure you can eat after cleaning with oil. All this ham have mould but before it is sold they also clean it with oil or fat. Mostly the customer don't see it, but sometimes because of the humidity or if it is hot it can appear again, but it ...



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