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33

No peeling is needed. A good wash and proper cooking will handle all of your food safety needs.


29

Sure it's safe. You are about to char the outside at very high temperatures, nothing's going to survive that, so cleaning it is more about flavor than safety. I wouldn't just wipe it though, clean it with water or you might get a dirtier steak flavor than you'd like.


13

This depends completely on the context. Are you at a grill in let's say.. Outback Steakhouse? If so, please throw it away. Are you at a social event or home cooking for yourself/others? clean it off with water and you're good, maybe even feed it to someone you don't like afterwards (unless it's the biggest and best steak, then you gotta eat it.)


13

Assuming the can was canned properly and has not been damaged, the contents are effectively sterile, because the food is boiled in the can after it's sealed. There might be some degradation in texture and taste, but in terms of food safety, they are effectively safe. Note that the date on your tin is given as Best Before, not Use By. That generally means ...


11

@niemiro, in your post does "go bad" mean food quality or food safety? As for safety, you were no where near the "danger zone" either temperature-wise or time-wise. Initially safe, properly stored, frozen food that warms to -6C (or 22 F) for 30 minutes will not render it unsafe to eat. In terms of food quality, freezers (most of which these days are ...


11

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


11

Absolutely no peeling necessary. In addition to the above advice, if you (or anyone else) is overly concerned about 'germs' and the like on the skin, use a small plastic-bristled scrub brush to clean the potatoes properly under running water. I usually don't, unless they are really gritty from the field or have huge divots on the surface where water may not ...


9

It depends on what it is likely to pick up. If it's an interior floor surface that is usually kept clean, you're unlikely to suffer any ill effects. If it's outside on the ground next to the gas grill and you regularly fertilize/pesticide/herbicide the lawn, or sealed/stained your deck/concrete recently, or have a number of animals that use the space as a ...


7

I rarely peel my potatoes, I love the flavor and nutritional benefits (and ease) of retaining the peelings. If skin is too old or green, then I'll peel. This discusses the concern of green potatoes: Are Green Potatoes OK? PS: I always wash my potatoes with a vegetable brush under water; I always wash all produce.


6

Anything you store in the freezer needs to be airtight, or odors will propagate. And they'll linger in the freezer itself, not just the other food, so you really want to avoid this. If you're using plastic bags to store things in your freezer (and they're not zip-seal bags), make sure they're thick and tied off airtight. No harm using multiple bags to make ...


6

Not only is peeling not needed for potatoes, but in my educated opinion peeling potatoes is not recommended. As long as you follow proper food etiquette like washing your hands and properly washing the foods before you cook them, as well as cooking at the proper temperature, then you do not need to worry about bacteria. Make sure to wash the potato well, ...


5

The accepted answer from the linked question is just as accurate in this situation. Assuming you're talking about "stew meat" sized pieces (about 2cm per side or so) by the time smaller pieces brown sufficiently, they should be nearly if not completely cooked through. By similar logic, when you refrigerate them they should cool down more quickly than a ...


5

It's extremely common for professional chefs to have fans: most of the time these are mandated by regulations for the safety of those in and out of the kitchen. If you producing so much smoke to be considering protective gear my advice would be to change your method because as it stands you are at risk of fire and you aren't doing your lungs (or those of the ...


5

Normally, there are no ingredients shared between butter and mayonnaise. The only ingredient in butter is milk, either fresh or cultured. The ingredients of mayonnaise are egg yolks, vegetable oil, mustard, water and acid. As you can see, there is nothing in common between the two. There are two exceptions when they may share something. First, you can ...


5

What is food grade lye Pure lye is by itself always food grade. There is nothing toxic about lye (although it's corrosive even at low-ish concentrations). When a manufacturer sells you food grade lye, they are guaranteeing you that it is not contaminated with anything unpleasant. After all, a chemistry plant will make a lot of different chemicals using ...


5

That foam is perfectly natural. The foam is the result of meats natural protein composition. If you've ever poached eggs, or boiled lobster, or cooked a stock, you'll know that the water can become a little scummy. If you leave the pot on, that scum makes a white-ish or grey-ish foam that forms lovely looking rafts. That foam is made of water soluble ...


4

No because: The environment you describe is not oxygen deficient and therefore not favorable to botulism growth. Simply being under a tray doesn't make an oxygen-free environment. Plain oil provides almost no nutrients to support bacterial growth. You need another food source for bacteria to grow in significant number. But let's take the worst case ...


4

I think vacuum sealed raw chicken breasts in the fridge behave like not-vacuum-sealed chicken breast in the fridge because the meat is neither sterile nor less contaminated with bacteria than the non-vacuumed meat and there are surely bacteria that grow under anaerobic conditions. The meat will be safe for 2 days.


4

Below is a direct copy of my reply to a question about expiration dates. Of course, in a sampling of old & new canned goods, they found that they preferred the old ones. (and they discussed a few foods that intentionally fermented in cans) Lucky Peach ran an article by Harold McGee on canned goods that mentions: Standard canned goods aren’t ...


3

They are probably safe to eat, although it's difficult to tell for sure. The basic rule is that food should spend no longer than 2 hours in the danger zone between 4 and 60 Celsius. Assuming that it took them less than 2 hours to go from "warm and unfrozen" to fridge temperature (which is below 4 Celsius), they are officially safe to eat. With small food ...


3

You seem to be somewhat conflating the destruction of potentially beneficial compounds in oils with the formation of toxic compounds when they're heated past the smoke point. The potentially harmful stuff doesn't necessarily stay behind in the oil - it's largely in the smoke, where it becomes highly mobile and easily inhaled. So the biggest reason to use ...


3

The marks and various labelling quirks might help you but this is something that's going to vary hugely from product to product. Ultimately, I can't see a good solution that doesn't involve talking to the genuine version's creators. They might be able to explain printing errors or recipe changes, They should be able to describe their product so you can ...


3

This is quite a common question and the simple answer is yes (within reason). Tinned food has been found that is 100 years old and still edible. For food this old, there would likely be a loss of the original taste. As your tinned food is less than a month old there would be no problem in eating this. So long as food is stored around room temperature then ...


3

If the shell is undamaged, and the eggs are not past their expiration/best by date, they are safe to eat. Official source: your government's food safety agency, unless you live in a place with really really lax food regulation. But your profile says Australia - I'm sure things are fine there. If there are problems with salmonella outbreaks, it's not anything ...


3

5 seconds under the tap, then back on the grill. If you have any organisms on the floor / ground etc. capable of surviving proper cooking of meat within 30 seconds of being exposed to said meat, your guests are doomed. ("The Salmon Mousse!") They won't be on warm meat long enough - E.Coli (the bad one) needs 20 minutes to divide, and that's after a ...


3

A caveat to the washing off suggested by others, I would add: Do not wash so thoroughly that the flavor is lost - you may as well throw it away then. Just pour water for 3-4 seconds. After that, if you feel it is still dirty, then take a serrated knife and thinly scrape off the part that touched the ground.


3

The Food and Drug Administration has approved several waxes for such use, made from shellacs, paraffins, palm oil derivatives and synthetic resins. Those ingredients are also in waxes for your car and kitchen floor, but as far as anyone knows, the waxes used on produce are safe. The caveat is necessary because the FDA has never adequately tested them for ...


3

Simple: Walk your favourite super-market's corridors; some food is in the fridge, some other not. Follow suit and watch out for the expiration dates: they are meant to define expiry under such conditions.


3

The short and clear answer is: it is absolutely not safe. As with any cooked food, the official safe period is 4 hours outside of the fridge. That's it, no matter if you have eggs, or anything else inside. I'm aware that many people don't care for the official guidelines, and go by feeling and food type, and that's their right. But there is no way to give ...


3

Since it is a custard, you should probably refrigerate it as soon as it is cool. A very sugary or acidic custard may be able to resist bacteria for a couple days (see Bismark donuts), but unless the recipe was specifically developed to be stable at room temperature, then there is some risk of it going bad. If you have a fridge, there's no reason not to use ...



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