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16

Do as others do and use a camping stove. They come as gas stoves like this one or even as wood- or charcoal-fired versions (see here). Perhaps an avid camper among your friends could even lend you one, means you'd only have to buy the fuel. But before you do this check with the local authorities / people responsible for the event whether they are ok with ...


9

You need a Thermette (Kelly Kettle or Storm Kettle in North America - they're all brand names). This would match the vintage theme. Larger ones have taps near the base, and can boil 10 cups of tea in a few minutes. These were coveted by construction and rail road worker gangs, as they could have a 10 minute break for a cup of tea and a biscuit (cookie in ...


6

Use a Vacuum Flask An every-day thermos is not big enough for this task, but food service professionals have provided hot coffee and tea with larger purpose built containers. Background In China boiling water is often put in large (maybe about 3 liters) vacuum flasks. These are used at tea conventions, on trains, and at roadside stops. The water stays ...


5

Is it mold? It definitely is. Whatever happened to it, it is bad. Are the batch and mother salvageable? I wouldn't think of that for a second. The mold is everywhere. Just get rid of it.


5

Onions shouldn't degrade that quickly at room temperature anyhow, even if they weren't partially dried. This food safety and preservation site specifically addresses inadequately dried foods: Check containers within seven to 10 days to see if moisture is present. If you see moisture, remove food and redry at 140 to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. If food is ...


4

Safety-wise: If the food is heated at least to 180° F/ 80°C, I'd like to cite Jefromi But if you're just cooking for yourself I personally wouldn't really worry about it, because in general you'll be cooking the food at a safe temperature, not just above the danger zone (140F/60C) but something safe for all meat (180F/80C) so whatever bacteria you ...


3

Turning brown on top is usually a sign of too much oxygen in the jar. The NCHFP FAQ covers this exact topic (search for "dark"). There are a few primary causes: too much headspace, or bubbles left in the jam before processing; not enough liquid to cover bits of food/fruit; or not enough processing time. All of these result in the surface of the jam ...


3

OK, so I left one of the butters (the Kerrygold) out for a little while longer to see if it would affect the taste. I tried it again the day after taking it out of the freezer and the sour notes disappeared! So I guess my freezer isn't the culprit after all. Here are the possibilities as I see them: The first butter (Plugra) was, in fact, a bit rancid. ...


3

Clearly, the Blendtec, "will it blend" videos, are a marketing tool designed to illustrate the power of the product, as opposed to illustrating recipes for delicious smoothies. Is it safe to drink? There is nothing here: http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/ that I have been able to find, which deems the "woody part" inedible or unsafe. So, strictly ...


3

A copyright date isn't a good way to determine the age of the food. It's likely that the copyright date is much older unless the design is very recent. As far as whether it goes bad, StillTasty gives it 1 year past its date, unopened.


3

What you want is something that is listed as NSF rated for food storage. I know both Huskie and Rubbermaid Brute containers (10 gal, 20 gal, 32 gal, 55 gal) that are gray, yellow or white have that rating. If you have a restaurant supply store in your area, you could go look around for "ingredient bins" and commercial garbage cans. Just remember, a white ...


3

If your event is (a) outdoors (b) in a warm climate... you could have some fun with (and attract a fair bit of attention to your booth..) with a solar heating method. There are several videos available online to show you how to do this, one example is from the king of random but a quick google search will reveal many ways boil water.


3

I raise my own pigs and don't feed them any fish. I feed all kinds of fruit, avos, eggs, acacia tree leaves, red apple succulent etc. All past pigs were excellent and not fishy. I never had the fish taste problem before this"girl" pig. It tastes like fish when cooked. It is like fresh fish, not fishy bad fish. It does not smell like fish or good or bad. I ...


2

I always taste food, all the time, all throughout the cooking process. It is the only way to know if you are serving something that is good or not. What I do, is "clean as you go". As you are preparing a meal, you should not end up with a mountain of dirty dishes afterwards. All of that should be cleaned as your cooking. Therefore, if you practice this, ...


2

Very unlikely. Cans are made from either steel (uncritical) or aluminum (dito), covered with a thin layer of tin (dito) or epoxy coating. These materials are explicitly choosen because they are food-safe1, even at higher temperatures than you use with home cooking: Tin cans are sterilized after filling to make the food inside shelf-stable. So the only way ...


2

All plastic is "food safe". The term "food safe" has been much abused in recent years because of a perceived risk of leeching of certain chemical from the plastic into acidic foods, or into hot foods Actual studies have shown this problem to be below the recognised safe levels, and/or to happen at much higher heat than reported What is really of concern, ...


2

To quote from your own source: It’s best to plan ahead for slow, safe thawing in the refrigerator. After defrosting bacon by this method, it will be safe in the refrigerator for 7 days before cooking. If you decide not to use the bacon during this time, you can safely refreeze it without cooking it first. And, further up: It’s not important if a ...


2

Re-freezing is typically referred to in a different context. E.g., you took the something out of the freezer, let it thaw, and then put it back in the freezer in its original state. Technically you are not 're-freezing' the bacon. You took the bacon out of the freezer and used it in your rouladen. Now you are freezing the rouladen. It would be the same if ...


1

Yep, that is safe. If safe food is frozen and kept frozen (at or lower than that 0F, which home freezers typically are), the food will remain safe indefinitely. Some foods take a quality hit being refrozen, but safety is not a concern. Every entry in the Still Tasty database (the FDA, CDC and USDA site) has a comment to that effect. Watch your time in the ...


1

What turns your jam brown is the same substance that turns cut fruit brown: Oxygen. The head space in your jars is filled with air, albeit less than at normal pressure. A jam jar has no genuine vacuum (= nothing there), but low pressure. To decrease the amount of oxygen that can react with your jam, you need to reduce the amount of air in the headspace. ...


1

You can of course try to thaw it in your microwave (if you have one) or in your regular oven on low heat. However, I've never had any problems cooking with frozen ground beef. Just cook it on fairly low-medium heat and scrape off the outer layers as they get thawed. This might be easier and take a shorter amount of time if you manage to split it into smaller ...


1

A floater does not indicate a rotten egg. It only indicates an old egg. When a chicken lays an egg there is no air inside. The shell is porous and over time water will evaporate out of the egg leaving an air pocket at one end. If you're concerned, crack the egg into a small bowl and smell it. If it smalls bad, discard. Remember, cooking will kill salmonella ...



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