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9

I don't see how anything intrinsic about chickens has changed with respect to safety. We know that chickens can carry the salmonella bacteria and that means there's always a risk of a very serious illness when handling/eating raw chicken. Having said that, being too obsessed with these risks is what seems to be happening to the younger generations. The ...


9

I don't think much has happened to washing a chicken in itself, rather much more has happened to our knowledge about bacteria, hygiene, and cross contamination. Most likely, with or without washing, nothing bad is going to happen. But then again: It might. Properly cooking the poultry is going to get rid of the bacteria on the chicken, no washing needed. ...


7

The question actually brings up two separate issues: (1) When did the U.S. "start refrigerating eggs on a regular basis," i.e., when did the process of refrigeration become a common practice with eggs? Answer: late 1800s (2) When did refrigerated eggs "become the norm," i.e., when did American consumers expect eggs to be always (or almost always) ...


5

In catering, you do not use your home fridge because your family opens and closes it so many times that the temperature drops and the food in it that is cooked does not stay at a steady temperature. For example, you said she may prepare seafood. That is a Big NO NO. The seafood should be prepared and served within hours. Think about it like this: ...


3

The easiest and best solution for the problem is to not dissolve it into water in the first place. Powdered sweetener keeps indefinitely. Dissolved sweetener falls smack in the middle of FAT TOM, so you have converted a shelf stable food into an unstable one. Assuming that you want to keep it at room temperature, there is not that much you can do. You can ...


2

That's ridiculous. Throwing out everything the chicken touches is just plain wasteful. Just don't cross contaminate. You can wash away bacteria, and its dies without a host. Also consider the fact that foodborne illness cannot go through your skin. Exposure to bacteria actually increases your immunity. Poultry might be prone to bacteria, but proper cooking ...


2

Today's fryers spend their entire short lives on antibiotics, increasing the likelihood that whatever germs their little corpses carry may be antibiotic resistant. Today's fryers are raised in environments harsh and dirty enough that feeding them antibiotics all their lives is a good business investment. Food paranoia is becoming the norm. Many adults have ...


1

Grease makes an anaerobic environment —that is, that it lacks oxygen— and while that may prevent many types of bacteria from growing in it (Staph.,E. coli,etc.), Clostridia species (including the kind that causes botulism) are obligate anaerobes— they need to have an oxygen poor environment in which to live. Now, will all that scalding ...


1

I have no personal experience, so I can only say what I've found on the web: There's a guide to pickling fish on the University of Minnesota website: Pickling is an easy method of preserving fish. Pickled fish must be stored in the refrigerator at no higher than 40° F (refrigerator temperature), and for best flavor must be used within four to six weeks. ...


1

Most milk is pasteurised by bringing it to between 71 and 74C for 15 to 30 seconds. This is called High Temperature Short Time pasteurisation. Boiling milk means just that: bringing the milk to its boiling point, which is 100C. That should naturally should make it as safe as the HTST pasteurised variety as it will spend plenty of time at well over the ...



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