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4

The whole point of canning is to produce food that won't spoil. The only reason to boil canned food is if you think it was improperly canned, and if that's true, it may not be safe to eat even if boiled. Botulism bacteria, for example, will grow in many improperly canned foods, and it will not be completely destroyed by boiling, though most of the botulism ...


3

You have to wash cleaners off, there's no other way to remove the dirt. The gunk is not going to magically evaporate, you will have to wipe. If your fridge is really dirty then I suggest a tub of soapy (dish soap) water, a sponge to clean and wipe, and a towel to dry. If it's not that bad then a kitchen safe spray cleaner and a sponge or paper towels will do ...


3

This shouldn't be a safety concern. Bacteria could certainly be introduced (if you use your hands to add the pepper or a cross-contaminated utensil), however, the acidic environment of the pickling liquid should keep any possible bacterial growth in check. The other contaminant to consider would be botulism, but again, in a pickling environment (high ...


3

The reason to not reuse marinade is not because "it has been sitting around", it's because it would be cross-contamination, as Chef_Code said. It doesn't matter how long you have used it. The moment the chicken touched it, the bacteria on the chicken surface - and there are lots of them - were also in the marinade. If you now dump fish pieces in it, you'll ...


2

I've cooked lots of meat in my President's Choice rice maker, which comes equipped with a steaming tray. The rice cooks for about 50 minutes, and if it senses there's extra water or moisture in there, it will keep extending the time by 1 minute. I have literally thrown entire 1.5" thick pork chops in there, chicken leg quarters, a small sirloin roast, all ...


2

Yes, you can freeze cooked chicken, no problem. As long as you follow safe food handling techniques, it is perfectly safe to defrost it for eating later. Since it has already been cooked, you do not need to bring it back up to 165 deg F. Just get it to the temperature at which you want to eat it, and enjoy! Do keep in mind that when you defrost your ...


2

The StillTasty link you give for the sausages is for all types of fresh, raw sausages, not just pork. That's why it's labeled "SAUSAGES (INCLUDING PORK, BEEF, CHICKEN OR TURKEY) — FRESH, RAW". Most likely, they're getting the 1–2-day limit from the chicken sausages (which are likely to have a higher initial bacteria load than pork or beef). Note that they ...


1

There are specialized "fridge cleaners" in the drugstore, but if you take a look at the ingredients list, you'll find out that you are paying lots of money for a small amount of alcohol and tensides. You can follow GdD's advice and use soap, then wash it off, then wipe it dry Other cleaners such as window cleaner can also be used, they are safe enough - ...


1

Assuming food-safe seeds (are there basil seeds that aren't?), yes it is safe, both to drink the water and to eat the seeds. That's the point. Just now I have been experimenting with different ways to drink soaked Sacred Basil seeds. Other types of basil seeds seem to work just the same way, as evidenced by the results of an Amazon search for "basil seeds ...


1

If the basil seeds are safe, the water should be also safe. If you have food-grade basil seeds (i.e. non-teated seeds) and didn't soak them for too long (so pathogens had enough time to grow), this should be safe. I think soaked basil seed last as long as soaked chia seeds, 2 weeks. There are even desserts / drinks with basil seeds and the water in which ...



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