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48

What most people don't get when it comes to food safety: Spoiled food has a chance of making you sick. When food is visibly spoiled, it has large bacterial colonies growing in it. This means that it has been exposed to conditions which were promoting bacterial growth. Anything which was present on your food will have grown, unless outcompeted by something ...


19

Unless he actually canned the sauce (processing the jars in boiling water bath or pressure canner as appropriate) and was working from a trusted recipe, no, this is definitely not safe. It takes processing like this to make canned goods shelf stable. And the recipe is important too; for example if the pH isn't low enough it's not safe to use the boiling ...


9

I like rumtscho's answer, but feel the need to add to it. Amount ingested is a main factor in if you get sick, so to answer your main question - a TINY bit of bad Ranch Dressing is unlikely to make you sick. A lot of foods are intentionally spoiled - yogurt, buttermilk, cottage cheese, cheese (especially Blue Cheese and the other moldy ones), meat is aged ...


4

While I agree that these types of warnings are conservative and partially CYA, I would suggest that they not be dismissed. What needs to be understood is that there are other factors involved past the production method. Even if a mfr./producer observes and maintains the highest quality standards in their production facility, they have no control over how ...


4

As the comments already cover, thou shalt not trifle with the sanitation department rules if you want to stay in the business. You might try tighter gloves or gloves of different (but still acceptable to the sanitation department) plastics/rubbers, or with different surface textures. Many "food service gloves" seem to the purchased on the one size fits none ...


3

There are also things which can happen to your food which won't cause any immediate symptoms, but which are quite bad for you in the long run. For instance, some molds produce mycotoxins (the most famous being aflatoxins) which can increase the risk of cancer. Apart from this, I believe rumtscho covered the reasons you shouldn't eat spoiled food pretty well ...


3

It depends what's in there; in most cases it's the toxins that make you sick, rather than the organisms themselves, but that's a generalization. Moldy cheese is bad - unless, of course, it's supposed to be moldy, in which case it's good (well, not to me, but to folks that like blue cheese it is...) Bacteria are bad - unless, of course, they happen to be ...


3

I cut it off also. Don't tell your friends you do it. I have heard you can freeze some cheeses, but I think it looses flavor with freezing. flavor is after all why you buy and eat cheese. have more cheese tasting parties.


2

There are some kinds of mold which are safe to consume (blue cheese is a common example) but in general they are not. While you might often be fine eating a bit, there's no guarantee, so to be safe you should throw out moldy food like your jerky. See the FDA's advice, for example.


1

There's a lot of good answers here, so let me focus on the part that's mostly omitted. A huge chunk of the food we eat is spoiled. Intentionally. The reasoning for each is very wide, from preventing harmful spoilage (food preservation), to improving taste, texture etc. The most obvious of those foods are of course cheeses and yoghurts. Even the simplest ...


1

I suppose dropping the bags in liquid nitrogen for a few minutes, and then storing in the freezer might suffice. mostly fish, but not a bad read: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/UCM252416.pdf Edit post clarification of the question: Liquid nitrogen is still fun if you can find an excuse, and highly effective. In a less drastic ...



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