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30

You don't really need a lot of tasting spoons, just one. Use your stirring spoon to pour some into your tasting spoon without touching. Or if that's too tricky, serve a bit onto a small plate/bowl. But if you're just cooking for yourself I personally wouldn't really worry about it, because in general you'll be cooking the food at a safe temperature, not ...


27

It is absolutely untrue and very dangerous to think that "if it looks OK, and smells OK, it must be OK." If that were the case, food poisoning would be very rare. Food that we can sense is spoiled rarely causes illness. For one thing what you don't eat can't hurt you and people generally won't eat food that looks or smells spoiled. But less obviously, much ...


24

Any halfway competent chef should indeed be tasting. The only way to know whether you're putting up good food is to check it yourself - and you'd better be consistent if you want to continue getting paid for it. That's not to say that all chefs do, nor that there's any one standard for how frequently to taste or what method should be used. It's pretty ...


23

Yes, chefs and cooks taste the food they prepare; even an experienced chef will do this, mostly to check seasoning (salt, pepper, etc.). However, most experienced cooks will taste less and will know how to tweak the preparation without having to constantly taste and re-taste. Cooks usually use spoons - tons of spoons - to taste food when they prepare it. ...


20

This article indicates that it's probably gall bladder bile: The gall bladder [...] sometimes [...] breaks even when you are cleaning the fish very carefully and close to the skin. If the gall bladder is broken, the greenish yellow biliary fluid pours immediately out into the inside of the fish and starts to absorb into the meat. The meat becomes bitter. ...


19

According to The Brewing Network, industrial and food grade CO2 generally come from the same plants: The slight difference between industrial-grade CO2 and food-grade CO2 is the type of tests that are done to qualify CO2 as beverage or beer gas-grade compared to industrial-grade. Currently, the FDA's requirement for food-grade CO2 a 99.90% purity rating. ...


17

I'm interested in the common practice in commercial settings (I have a small home-cooking business, and I want to align myself with the norm in restaurants etc..) Since this hasn't specifically been addressed yet, I'll throw in my experience in industrial kitchens/restaurants. Plastic spoons. Hundreds of them. Thousands of them. Literally. We had a ...


17

Virtually every case of botulism ever recorded in the past 50 years is due to improper home canning. The risk of botulism from a commercial product is so low that you literally have a better chance of being struck by lightning and almost as good a chance as being struck twice in the same year. There are 145 cases reported in the U.S. each year and 65% of ...


15

At a microscopic level metal is malleable, and so the edge tends to bend rather than spall or break off. Still, it is probably technically true to a certain extent, and based on many many years of metal knife usage by millions or billions of people through history, completely irrelevant. Whatever effect it may have is vanishingly small.


15

If the words "Keep Refrigerated" are on the label, and the ham was kept on the shelf for weeks or months, the only answer I can responsibly give is that you should call poison control: 1-800-222-1222 in the USA. If you're not in the USA, Google "Poison Control (your location)" or call a medical professional. Since you've already eaten it and we can't assure ...


13

There are three major properties an edible fat (I am assuming you are not asking about inedible oils like petroleum based products) has that affect how it is best used: Flavor Saturation Smoke point Properties Flavor The flavor of the fat is very important. So called neutral oils (like canola oil or refined grapeseed oil, or refined peanut oil, among ...


12

The University of Ohio extension publishes a clever tip: Place two or three ice cubes in a plastic freezer bag and seal. Keep this in the freezer at all times. In an upright freezer, you can have a test bag on each shelf. If there is a power outage you will know if the interior temperature was above 32°F if the cubes melt. If the cubes are melted, ...


11

When carrots turn black, it is almost always caused by rot. I would definitely not eat them.


11

Microscopic metal particles won't hurt you. The iron in fortified breakfast cereal is just food-grade iron particles. You can collect them with a magnet.


11

Certainly cooks should taste their food as they go, especially if they're making something they haven't made many times before. "Double-dipping" is common (even in commercial kitchens). It's the kind of thing a lot of people do, but no one wants to get caught doing it. This question is related: Food safety when tasting from dish, and you might find the ...


10

I fully endorse the "when in doubt, throw it out" doctrine, although I personally wouldn't consider a sweet taste to be doubt. As rfusca wisely points out, you can't taste or smell several kinds of contamination, and the ones that you can taste or smell, are usually sour, bitter, or generally pungent. I suggest you have a look at the following question: Is ...


9

The risks of eating under-cooked steak vary based on the the region, the risk status of the person involved (are they a child, elderly, or immuno-compromised in any way). For normal healthy adults, the risks of eating a single bit of under cooked steak in any of the industrialized nations are fairly small. Nothing might happen You might suffer from ...


9

The only thing that is even remotely possible in my mind is to use it akin to buttermilk or sour cream (which are intentionally fermented products) in baking. However, since the culture that fermented the milk was uncontrolled, I would not do so. I recommend discarding.


9

There are two different issues, which have separate drivers. There are no specific rules, just consequences of the thaw and freezing cycles on each food--but it is always better to minimize the number of cycles to maintain quality. Safety From a safety point of view, the rule is any perishable food (one that is not fairly stable at room temperature such ...


8

Capsaicin, the active ingredient that makes chili peppers hot, is not soluble in water, but it does dissolve in fat or alcohol. BTW, it is not an acid, but is a complex chemical similar to the main flavoring in vanilla; it directly stimulates the nerves. While washing your hands in vodka might be a little extravagant, you might try vegetable oil, and then ...


8

Most sauces do freeze solid, but it is the temperature, not the solidity, that matters for food safety. The hardiest bacteria, temperature-wise, are psychrophiles and can grow in temperatures as low as -15° C. Since they can't grow in temperatures above 10° C, they are very rarely found in food, but if your freezer is actually at -18° C (and you've verified ...


8

You can use the same board (I often do), but you must wash it in hot, soapy water in-between. Usually there is plenty of time to do this while the meat is cooking. Because bacteria grows exponentially, I'd recommend washing the board soon, even if you aren't going to reuse it, to prevent accidental cross-contamination. If you're using one meat board, you ...


8

Soured milk stays good for a long time (similarly to cheeses) - pretty much until mold starts forming. It is a common drink in Eastern Europe, and production is very simple - essentially "happens by itself": if you leave fresh, non-boiled, non-pasteurized milk in room temperature for a couple days, it turns into soured milk. It's used as ingredient for a few ...


8

I think that washing pre-washed greens is an issue of emotional security, if you don't trust the purveyor. As the FDA indicates: Many pre-cut, bagged, or packaged produce items like lettuce are pre-washed and ready-to-eat. If so, it will be stated on the packaging. If the package indicates that the contents are pre-washed and ready-to-eat, you can use ...


7

You cannot view the full study, but the summary already tells you the results: http://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/1988/12000/Epidemiologic_Study_of_Workers_Exposed_to_Titanium.11.aspx The objective of this study was to determine whether workers exposed to titanium dioxide (TiO2) had significantly higher risks of lung cancer, chronic respiratory ...


7

Meh, How Bad Could it Be? Been eating peaches with these things for as long as I can remember. I seem perfectly fine and nothing every happend to ... OMG ALIENS!! AHHH!!! Harmless Callus Tissue Anyways, more seriously, they're absolutely harmless and are just extra tissue called callus tissue, as sourced from these: ...


7

There are four methods for thawing frozen foods which are recognized as safe: In a refrigerator In the microwave Under cool running water As part of the cooking process These four methods all meet the criteria that they minimize the amount of time the food spends in the danger zone (40-140 F, 4-60 C) where bacteria can grow. The pros and cons of the ...


7

I did this in my restaurant for years, it really does work great. Make your rice in a huge batch, cook it as if you're planning to eat it then, but then let it cool until handlable. Once it is cool enough, bag it in individual servings and freeze it. Refrigerating cooked rice quickly ruins it, freezing it, however, works great. If your servings are fairly ...


7

If the ambient temperature outside (and thus in the car) was below 40 F / 4 C the entire time the meat was left out, then yes, it is still safe just as if it had been in the refrigerator (or freezer as the case may be). If that is not true, discard.


7

If the honey has always had a water content below ~18% and is continuously stored in a sealed container (for instance a glass jar), it is perfectly safe to eat as long as you are over 1 year old. In fact, pasteurized honey is inferior in quality. The pollen and spores will remain in there either way, even if they're dead and can only be removed by ...



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