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56

What most people don't get when it comes to food safety: Spoiled food has a chance of making you sick. When food is visibly spoiled, it has large bacterial colonies growing in it. This means that it has been exposed to conditions which were promoting bacterial growth. Anything which was present on your food will have grown, unless outcompeted by something ...


38

There is one very different issue to be kept in mind - water in a microwave can overheat and "explode" once it is disturbed. Another poster had exactly this problem a short while ago: Water exploded in Microwave So follow the usual precautions, e.g. putting a wooden toothpick or a small, very clean stone (chemists have them in their labs) in your vessel. ...


26

It's safe because freezing greatly slows (if not completely arrests) the growth of the bacteria that would otherwise make the meat spoil. It doesn't kill them, it just puts them in 'stasis'. The expiration date is given based on the meat only being refrigerated. If you intend to store the meat past its expiration date, best practice is to freeze the meat ...


19

Unless he actually canned the sauce (processing the jars in boiling water bath or pressure canner as appropriate) and was working from a trusted recipe, no, this is definitely not safe. It takes processing like this to make canned goods shelf stable. And the recipe is important too; for example if the pH isn't low enough it's not safe to use the boiling ...


16

Still tasty implicitly says that the sauce stays indefinitely technically edible. The expiration date is only for quality purposes. I think the sauce probably doesn't have an expiration date but rather a "Best By" or "Best if Used By" date. Storage time shown is for best quality only — after that, the sauce's texture, color or flavor may change, but ...


16

Do as others do and use a camping stove. They come as gas stoves like this one or even as wood- or charcoal-fired versions (see here). Perhaps an avid camper among your friends could even lend you one, means you'd only have to buy the fuel. But before you do this check with the local authorities / people responsible for the event whether they are ok with ...


13

I don't think much has happened to washing a chicken in itself, rather much more has happened to our knowledge about bacteria, hygiene, and cross contamination. Most likely, with or without washing, nothing bad is going to happen. But then again: It might. Properly cooking the poultry is going to get rid of the bacteria on the chicken, no washing needed. ...


13

I don't see how anything intrinsic about chickens has changed with respect to safety. We know that chickens can carry the salmonella bacteria and that means there's always a risk of a very serious illness when handling/eating raw chicken. Having said that, being too obsessed with these risks is what seems to be happening to the younger generations. The ...


12

Dairy is something of a special case because the natural bacteria in dairy products will tend to outcompete any interlopers...In short you're more likely to end up with a kind of redneck buttermilk (from the action of natural Lactococcus lactis or Lactobacillus bulgaricus) than something that is toxic to you. So unless the milk was already contaminated with ...


11

Unless you're planning to consume a few kilo of each of them in one sitting, I would say you're being too cautious. Tomato, bell peppers, chilis and potatoes are all part of the nightshades family, and are toxic to some degree. But the poison is in the dose. The amount contained with in the vegetables would mean you'll have to consume an inordinate amount of ...


10

Since it was unheated, this is definitely a sign of food contamination. Since this had Italian sausage, it is low pH, and could be in danger of botulism toxin. Here is information from the CDC about botulism. If you ate the sauce, I recommend you see a doctor quickly, as it can lead to paralysis. If it had been heated, it could have just been boiling over. ...


10

I like rumtscho's answer, but feel the need to add to it. Amount ingested is a main factor in if you get sick, so to answer your main question - a TINY bit of bad Ranch Dressing is unlikely to make you sick. A lot of foods are intentionally spoiled - yogurt, buttermilk, cottage cheese, cheese (especially Blue Cheese and the other moldy ones), meat is aged ...


10

You need a Thermette (Kelly Kettle or Storm Kettle in North America - they're all brand names). This would match the vintage theme. Larger ones have taps near the base, and can boil 10 cups of tea in a few minutes. These were coveted by construction and rail road worker gangs, as they could have a 10 minute break for a cup of tea and a biscuit (cookie in ...


10

There is no difference. Whether you boil water in a kettle or in a microwave, it reaches a temperature of 100 °C/212 °F at sea level. Not only that, but no method that doesn't involve pressure will get the water to reach a temperature of over 100 °C/212 °F. Water boiled in a microwave is just as safe as water boiled in a kettle.


10

Simple, the answer is no. Throw them right in the trash.


10

The idea is to brown the outside of the meat in order to develop the flavour via the Maillard Reaction. This flavour will add to the richness and meatiness of the stew as a whole. Go ahead and give it a good crust. Don't overcrowd the pan or you will just end up steaming the meat in its own juices and it will never brown up: fry it in small batches instead. ...


10

The food safety guidelines are based on scientific & mathematical calculations along the lines of: Given an initial bacteria count of X they will under the given conditions mulitply to a number of Y amd have produced Z [unit] of toxins. Now what to do with these values? We use them like seat belts or helmets. Not wearing a seat belt will not ...


9

Perfectly safe. From the Henning's Market FAQ: The shiny, greenish, rainbow like color on sliced ham is a sign of oxidation that occurs when the meat is exposed to the metal on a knife or slicer. The nitrate-modified iron content of the meat undergoes a chemical change that alters the hams pigmentation. This effect can also be seen in sliced beef, such ...


9

Absolutely! Right away if you like. And you may well notice they taste really nice when you do that. "New potatoes" - small, and not stored for long - are delicious.


9

No, it is not safe anymore. The scombridae family of fish (mackerels, tunas, bonitos) decay in a way that does not necessarily cause a bad smell, as the bacteria just convert amino acids of the fish into a harmful version. The bacteria that does this is unfortunately facultative anaerobic, which means it prefers oxygen, but will do without, too. So, the ...


9

I found this very informative article from the Crown Prince company, an anchovy canner and distributor. Apparently the reason for cold storage has to do with the preservation process and product quality: Anchovy Handling Anchovies are a "semi-preserved" product. This means that they are not sterilized by either cooking or pasteurization. Instead, ...


9

When being canned (or jarred as in this case) the ingredients are put into the jar hot before a lid is put on. When the ingredients cool it creates a suction that pulls the lid down. When you open the lid and hear a pop what is happening is that air is coming in to fill the low pressure inside, which indicates that there was a good seal. This is definitely a ...


8

While many pictures show them deep red (perhaps for the dramatic effect?), even orange flesh wih only some red tinge is normal. Even the wikipedia link you gave in the question states: The Moro is a "deep blood orange" meaning that the flesh ranges from orange-veined with ruby coloration, to vermilion, to vivid crimson, to nearly black. The color of ...


8

This is a reasonably common practice in South Asian cuisine. Some reasonably credibly information can be found in the Wikipedia article on vark. Quoting from the section on safety: Gold and silver are approved food foils in the European Union, as E175 and E174 additives respectively. The independent European food-safety certification agency, TÜV ...


8

The biggest concern with fish caught in the wild is the presence of parasites. You'll have to look up which species of parasite are present in the species of fish that you wish to use, and treat it accordingly. Tapeworm is common in salmon, and several other varieties of fish have various parasites capable of infecting a human host. Most sites I've seen ...


8

All anchovies I have ever seen in cans or jars are shelf stable. There is no reason to sell them cold unless there is a consumer preference for them to be sold that way. I have never seen canned or jarred anchovies in the cooler (US). There may be brands sold elsewhere that are not shelf stable, but they should be labeled as such, particularly since canned ...


7

According to research conducted at the University of Idaho and published in 2014 in the journal Food Protection Trends, there are now consumer guidelines to process garlic (and certain herbs) safely through acidification before adding to oil. I would read the first link thoroughly to understand the necessary process. To ensure safety, follow the steps ...


7

I've done it before without problems. Even if they're peanut butter & jelly (something that's typically stored in the fridge), it has so much sugar in it that it's inhospitable to microbes. If you want to play it extra safe, and the sandiwiches won't be easten shortly after you leave, you could place them in the freezer and then let them thaw in your ...


7

The question actually brings up two separate issues: (1) When did the U.S. "start refrigerating eggs on a regular basis," i.e., when did the process of refrigeration become a common practice with eggs? Answer: late 1800s (2) When did refrigerated eggs "become the norm," i.e., when did American consumers expect eggs to be always (or almost always) ...


7

Sprouted onions are perfectly safe to eat. If far advanced the texture may not be ideal; yours does not sound very far advanced at all (not even green.) Considering you can eat green onions, there's nothing to fear from onion sprouts.



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