Hot answers tagged

40

There is one very different issue to be kept in mind - water in a microwave can overheat and "explode" once it is disturbed. Another poster had exactly this problem a short while ago: Water exploded in Microwave So follow the usual precautions, e.g. putting a wooden toothpick or a small, very clean stone (chemists have them in their labs) in your vessel. ...


19

It sounds like it's fermented, and more harmful bacteria or mold could definitely have grown without being visible. So it's not safe, in that there's definitely some risk. It's hard to evaluate exactly how risky it is. It sounds like you're already routinely taking risks by eating iffy food that's not obviously rotten or moldy, so you certainly could choose ...


16

Still tasty implicitly says that the sauce stays indefinitely technically edible. The expiration date is only for quality purposes. I think the sauce probably doesn't have an expiration date but rather a "Best By" or "Best if Used By" date. Storage time shown is for best quality only — after that, the sauce's texture, color or flavor may change, but ...


16

Do as others do and use a camping stove. They come as gas stoves like this one or even as wood- or charcoal-fired versions (see here). Perhaps an avid camper among your friends could even lend you one, means you'd only have to buy the fuel. But before you do this check with the local authorities / people responsible for the event whether they are ok with ...


13

I don't think much has happened to washing a chicken in itself, rather much more has happened to our knowledge about bacteria, hygiene, and cross contamination. Most likely, with or without washing, nothing bad is going to happen. But then again: It might. Properly cooking the poultry is going to get rid of the bacteria on the chicken, no washing needed. ...


13

I don't see how anything intrinsic about chickens has changed with respect to safety. We know that chickens can carry the salmonella bacteria and that means there's always a risk of a very serious illness when handling/eating raw chicken. Having said that, being too obsessed with these risks is what seems to be happening to the younger generations. The ...


11

Unless you're planning to consume a few kilo of each of them in one sitting, I would say you're being too cautious. Tomato, bell peppers, chilis and potatoes are all part of the nightshades family, and are toxic to some degree. But the poison is in the dose. The amount contained with in the vegetables would mean you'll have to consume an inordinate amount of ...


11

There is no difference. Whether you boil water in a kettle or in a microwave, it reaches a temperature of 100 °C/212 °F at sea level. Not only that, but no method that doesn't involve pressure will get the water to reach a temperature of over 100 °C/212 °F. Water boiled in a microwave is just as safe as water boiled in a kettle.


11

The food safety guidelines are based on scientific & mathematical calculations along the lines of: Given an initial bacteria count of X they will under the given conditions mulitply to a number of Y amd have produced Z [unit] of toxins. Now what to do with these values? We use them like seat belts or helmets. Not wearing a seat belt will not ...


10

You need a Thermette (Kelly Kettle or Storm Kettle in North America - they're all brand names). This would match the vintage theme. Larger ones have taps near the base, and can boil 10 cups of tea in a few minutes. These were coveted by construction and rail road worker gangs, as they could have a 10 minute break for a cup of tea and a biscuit (cookie in ...


10

Simple, the answer is no. Throw them right in the trash.


10

The idea is to brown the outside of the meat in order to develop the flavour via the Maillard Reaction. This flavour will add to the richness and meatiness of the stew as a whole. Go ahead and give it a good crust. Don't overcrowd the pan or you will just end up steaming the meat in its own juices and it will never brown up: fry it in small batches instead. ...


10

The short answer is "No," it's definitely not a US-only problem. Since the question makes comparisons between the US and Europe, I will focus mainly on those two areas. Unfortunately, it's hard to estimate illnesses from eggs only, because frequently Salmonella outbreaks from eggs are due to how they are handled in the kitchen and what other foods they ...


9

Perfectly safe. From the Henning's Market FAQ: The shiny, greenish, rainbow like color on sliced ham is a sign of oxidation that occurs when the meat is exposed to the metal on a knife or slicer. The nitrate-modified iron content of the meat undergoes a chemical change that alters the hams pigmentation. This effect can also be seen in sliced beef, such ...


9

Absolutely! Right away if you like. And you may well notice they taste really nice when you do that. "New potatoes" - small, and not stored for long - are delicious.


9

No, it is not safe anymore. The scombridae family of fish (mackerels, tunas, bonitos) decay in a way that does not necessarily cause a bad smell, as the bacteria just convert amino acids of the fish into a harmful version. The bacteria that does this is unfortunately facultative anaerobic, which means it prefers oxygen, but will do without, too. So, the ...


9

I found this very informative article from the Crown Prince company, an anchovy canner and distributor. Apparently the reason for cold storage has to do with the preservation process and product quality: Anchovy Handling Anchovies are a "semi-preserved" product. This means that they are not sterilized by either cooking or pasteurization. Instead, ...


9

When being canned (or jarred as in this case) the ingredients are put into the jar hot before a lid is put on. When the ingredients cool it creates a suction that pulls the lid down. When you open the lid and hear a pop what is happening is that air is coming in to fill the low pressure inside, which indicates that there was a good seal. This is definitely a ...


9

Summary: It's impossible to give a good statistical answer to this question, since historically botulism was associated with only certain foods, and diagnosis was mostly based on symptoms occurring after consumption of those foods. Thus, old statistics include a small subset of actual cases. Actual medical testing for botulism in an ambiguous case was not ...


8

The biggest concern with fish caught in the wild is the presence of parasites. You'll have to look up which species of parasite are present in the species of fish that you wish to use, and treat it accordingly. Tapeworm is common in salmon, and several other varieties of fish have various parasites capable of infecting a human host. Most sites I've seen ...


8

There is definitely no food safety concern here. While the report you cite makes a big deal out of this, implying that there's some kind of serious problem being detected here, in their FAQ they say: The most likely cause is hair, skin, or fingernail that was accidentally mixed in during the manufacturing process. It is unlikely that human DNA is ...


8

All anchovies I have ever seen in cans or jars are shelf stable. There is no reason to sell them cold unless there is a consumer preference for them to be sold that way. I have never seen canned or jarred anchovies in the cooler (US). There may be brands sold elsewhere that are not shelf stable, but they should be labeled as such, particularly since canned ...


7

According to research conducted at the University of Idaho and published in 2014 in the journal Food Protection Trends, there are now consumer guidelines to process garlic (and certain herbs) safely through acidification before adding to oil. I would read the first link thoroughly to understand the necessary process. To ensure safety, follow the steps ...


7

The question actually brings up two separate issues: (1) When did the U.S. "start refrigerating eggs on a regular basis," i.e., when did the process of refrigeration become a common practice with eggs? Answer: late 1800s (2) When did refrigerated eggs "become the norm," i.e., when did American consumers expect eggs to be always (or almost always) ...


7

What you want is something that is listed as NSF rated for food storage. I know both Huskie and Rubbermaid Brute containers (10 gal, 20 gal, 32 gal, 55 gal) that are gray, yellow or white have that rating. If you have a restaurant supply store in your area, you could go look around for "ingredient bins" and commercial garbage cans. Just remember, a white ...


7

Even If i put on the tin foil beanie and assert that microwaves are dangerous to food, the microwave remains an ideal way to boil and heat water. Leaving aside the steam dangers which are mostly common to steam regardless of heat source (steam is dangerous) the most dangerous chemical reactions possible from high energy ionization is to produce mild base (HO ...


7

You should be fine. I couldn't find your particular recipe, but many canning recipes for peppers (and salsas, pickles & relishes) contain garlic. As long as there is sufficient vinegar, which the name of your recipe suggests, and you processed correctly there shouldn't be a problem. This recipe for Pickled Peppers may be similar to yours and contains ...


7

As I explained in another question recently, there is no meaningful answer to this. There is no way to make the prediction "you have a X percent chance of infection per parasite infested meal". Instead of predicting it mathematically, we could feed people infected fish and measure it, but as far as I am aware, no ethical board will approve that experiment. ...


7

As a starting point, I found this article, which says: The suggested temperature specification for refrigeration of foods has been revisited from time to time as knowledge and technology have advanced. Initially 7°C (45°F) was considered the optimal temperature; however, technological improvements have made it economical to have domestic refrigeration ...


7

The FDA recommends 160°F (71°C) for dishes containing eggs. If you're scrambling eggs or making an omelette, as long as they're coagulated/solidified, they'll be safe. The easiest way to confirm this is with sous vide eggs. For example, this Food Lab sous vide egg guide has 155°F, 160°F, and 165°F eggs: which clearly show that the white won't be ...



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