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0

I wouldn't go much more than a week. When i worked in the restaurant biz that was generally the rule though we always sold out. If its going to be longer than that it needs to be frozen. If you see any darkening or discoloration its gotta go in the can. With chicken always better safe than sorry.


4

I think vacuum sealed raw chicken breasts in the fridge behave like not-vacuum-sealed chicken breast in the fridge because the meat is neither sterile nor less contaminated with bacteria than the non-vacuumed meat and there are surely bacteria that grow under anaerobic conditions. The meat will be safe for 2 days.


0

Most health codes will have concepts of 'high risk' vs. 'low risk' foods. 'Low risk' are the foods that can be held at room temperature for longer periods of times with a low risk of getting people sick. It includes things such as: Really dry things (eg, uncooked grains, pasta or beans, bread, cookies, crackers, jerky, etc.). Specifically preserved ...


3

Simple: Walk your favourite super-market's corridors; some food is in the fridge, some other not. Follow suit and watch out for the expiration dates: they are meant to define expiry under such conditions.


-4

Depends too largely on what is in the fridge and which part of the world you are in to be able to give a general accurate answer. Temepture Extemeophile bacteria are not known to be antibiotic resistant and are generally harmless.


11

@niemiro, in your post does "go bad" mean food quality or food safety? As for safety, you were no where near the "danger zone" either temperature-wise or time-wise. Initially safe, properly stored, frozen food that warms to -6C (or 22 F) for 30 minutes will not render it unsafe to eat. In terms of food quality, freezers (most of which these days are ...


9

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


1

I don't believe corn syrup would ever go bad, or for that matter, real maple syrup. Sugar is one of the best preservatives, hence jellies and jams to preserve fruit. Which reminds me of honey, which is virtually invincible, as it never goes bad, though it will darken with age. I say this now because I just learned that in the past few years and hope to save ...


1

Dairy and meats should be tossed to be safe if they were at 55 degrees for more than a few hours in my opinion. When I have difficulty tossing questionable food, I mentally compare the potential cost of a trip to the ER, lost work, and pain/suffering compared to the cost of the food. The decision to toss or not to toss could be compared to the quandary of ...


3

If the shell is undamaged, and the eggs are not past their expiration/best by date, they are safe to eat. Official source: your government's food safety agency, unless you live in a place with really really lax food regulation. But your profile says Australia - I'm sure things are fine there. If there are problems with salmonella outbreaks, it's not anything ...


4

Below is a direct copy of my reply to a question about expiration dates. Of course, in a sampling of old & new canned goods, they found that they preferred the old ones. (and they discussed a few foods that intentionally fermented in cans) Lucky Peach ran an article by Harold McGee on canned goods that mentions: Standard canned goods aren’t ...


13

Assuming the can was canned properly and has not been damaged, the contents are effectively sterile, because the food is boiled in the can after it's sealed. There might be some degradation in texture and taste, but in terms of food safety, they are effectively safe. Note that the date on your tin is given as Best Before, not Use By. That generally means ...


3

This is quite a common question and the simple answer is yes (within reason). Tinned food has been found that is 100 years old and still edible. For food this old, there would likely be a loss of the original taste. As your tinned food is less than a month old there would be no problem in eating this. So long as food is stored around room temperature then ...


-1

According to a local farmer I spoke with: when you shake an egg and it sloshes, it's rotten. When it floats to the top of a bowl of water its too old and if you feel something moving around inside when you shake it its rotten. If any of those 3, you should not consume the egg. If it has a hairline crack do not eat it because chances are bacteria has already ...


0

I read this question differently, and it may not be the original poster's intent, but I wonder if @mandi porter was asking if bacterial contamination can be transported by odor. Of course, the smell is an indication of bacterial spoilage, but it is not where the bacteria reside.


0

Definitely don't agree about the meat. You should get rid of any raw meat or fish in there no matter what. I would not even trust it after putting ice in there. Milk will likely be spoiled, or it will spoil much sooner than normal, but you can check that yourself. See the FDA's guidelines -"Temporarily" going over 40 degrees F is "okay" but above that, no: ...


6

Anything you store in the freezer needs to be airtight, or odors will propagate. And they'll linger in the freezer itself, not just the other food, so you really want to avoid this. If you're using plastic bags to store things in your freezer (and they're not zip-seal bags), make sure they're thick and tied off airtight. No harm using multiple bags to make ...


3

You seem to be somewhat conflating the destruction of potentially beneficial compounds in oils with the formation of toxic compounds when they're heated past the smoke point. The potentially harmful stuff doesn't necessarily stay behind in the oil - it's largely in the smoke, where it becomes highly mobile and easily inhaled. So the biggest reason to use ...


3

The marks and various labelling quirks might help you but this is something that's going to vary hugely from product to product. Ultimately, I can't see a good solution that doesn't involve talking to the genuine version's creators. They might be able to explain printing errors or recipe changes, They should be able to describe their product so you can ...


-1

Man! Don't even risk it! Toxins, spores, and the like reap peoples lives every day. If any question on a food in fridge throw it out! Your freezer is your freind in barf, sweat, hurt and die prevention, Its easy and safe right? Otherwise don't take anyone's word on refrigerator spoilage made good to eat again tactics.


3

The Food and Drug Administration has approved several waxes for such use, made from shellacs, paraffins, palm oil derivatives and synthetic resins. Those ingredients are also in waxes for your car and kitchen floor, but as far as anyone knows, the waxes used on produce are safe. The caveat is necessary because the FDA has never adequately tested them for ...


2

The lower bound seems to be at 2 to 4 days in the fridge. The upper bound is probably at 7 to 10 days in the fridge at less than 4°C (32 F) 1 1 Source: Swiss journal about poultry farming. This information refers to the storage of whole eggs. Two sentences before, the text says that cracked eggs stored at 4°C must be cooked within 48 hours to be conformable ...


5

Normally, there are no ingredients shared between butter and mayonnaise. The only ingredient in butter is milk, either fresh or cultured. The ingredients of mayonnaise are egg yolks, vegetable oil, mustard, water and acid. As you can see, there is nothing in common between the two. There are two exceptions when they may share something. First, you can ...


5

What is food grade lye Pure lye is by itself always food grade. There is nothing toxic about lye (although it's corrosive even at low-ish concentrations). When a manufacturer sells you food grade lye, they are guaranteeing you that it is not contaminated with anything unpleasant. After all, a chemistry plant will make a lot of different chemicals using ...


1

Even if you don't cook the steak afterwards (that is, assuming it was properly cooked when it hit the floor), keep in mind that the human immune system is more capable than we give it credit for. Moreover, pathogens that do make us ill, such as E. Coli and Streptococcus, prefer moist areas with an easy supply of nutrients; our floors and counter-tops aren't ...


-2

However it's proven false, i still would like to mention the following: In our country we apply the 5 Second Rule, which is very populair. It basicly comes down to this: Whatever kind of food you drop on the floor, if you pick it up in 5 seconds, it's ready to go! Never had any complaints ;-)


3

The short and clear answer is: it is absolutely not safe. As with any cooked food, the official safe period is 4 hours outside of the fridge. That's it, no matter if you have eggs, or anything else inside. I'm aware that many people don't care for the official guidelines, and go by feeling and food type, and that's their right. But there is no way to give ...


3

5 seconds under the tap, then back on the grill. If you have any organisms on the floor / ground etc. capable of surviving proper cooking of meat within 30 seconds of being exposed to said meat, your guests are doomed. ("The Salmon Mousse!") They won't be on warm meat long enough - E.Coli (the bad one) needs 20 minutes to divide, and that's after a ...


5

The accepted answer from the linked question is just as accurate in this situation. Assuming you're talking about "stew meat" sized pieces (about 2cm per side or so) by the time smaller pieces brown sufficiently, they should be nearly if not completely cooked through. By similar logic, when you refrigerate them they should cool down more quickly than a ...


4

No because: The environment you describe is not oxygen deficient and therefore not favorable to botulism growth. Simply being under a tray doesn't make an oxygen-free environment. Plain oil provides almost no nutrients to support bacterial growth. You need another food source for bacteria to grow in significant number. But let's take the worst case ...


3

A caveat to the washing off suggested by others, I would add: Do not wash so thoroughly that the flavor is lost - you may as well throw it away then. Just pour water for 3-4 seconds. After that, if you feel it is still dirty, then take a serrated knife and thinly scrape off the part that touched the ground.


9

It depends on what it is likely to pick up. If it's an interior floor surface that is usually kept clean, you're unlikely to suffer any ill effects. If it's outside on the ground next to the gas grill and you regularly fertilize/pesticide/herbicide the lawn, or sealed/stained your deck/concrete recently, or have a number of animals that use the space as a ...


3

Since it is a custard, you should probably refrigerate it as soon as it is cool. A very sugary or acidic custard may be able to resist bacteria for a couple days (see Bismark donuts), but unless the recipe was specifically developed to be stable at room temperature, then there is some risk of it going bad. If you have a fridge, there's no reason not to use ...


5

It's extremely common for professional chefs to have fans: most of the time these are mandated by regulations for the safety of those in and out of the kitchen. If you producing so much smoke to be considering protective gear my advice would be to change your method because as it stands you are at risk of fire and you aren't doing your lungs (or those of the ...


1

It is safe if you take some measures to clean the dust and other particles that might have sticked to the meat. Rinse the meat with lots of water, no soap. If you have some sauce to spare, after rinsing the meat, set apart some sauce (throw away that sauce afterwards) and use it to season the meat throughly. This will remove almost all the particles and ...


13

This depends completely on the context. Are you at a grill in let's say.. Outback Steakhouse? If so, please throw it away. Are you at a social event or home cooking for yourself/others? clean it off with water and you're good, maybe even feed it to someone you don't like afterwards (unless it's the biggest and best steak, then you gotta eat it.)


0

I believe that the process that you use in brewing and storing your coffee can make a difference. I have a coffee maker that you load with whole bean coffee and clear, cold water. Press a button and the coffee is ground and water drips through it and a filter into a vacuum bottle type container. It stays warm for hours, and when it is no longer hot enough ...


29

Sure it's safe. You are about to char the outside at very high temperatures, nothing's going to survive that, so cleaning it is more about flavor than safety. I wouldn't just wipe it though, clean it with water or you might get a dirtier steak flavor than you'd like.


0

Anything stored in olive oil is subject to bacterial growth, even in the fridge. If it is in an air tight container, such as a mason jar, it should last about 1 week. :)


0

I think that they'd be safe, presuming they're free of mold. However, I'd imagine that the flavor of the roots have likely diminished. Give them a try, let us know how the flavor was after four years in a cardboard box.


7

As I have noted in a couple of other answers, I have worked in the CPG (Consumer Packaged Goods) industry for almost 30 years. It is safe to say that there is not a simple answer to this question. There are so many variables that it would be difficult to even go into all of them. Before I go further, let me say that common sense goes a long way. Most food ...


2

"Best by" or "Best Before" usually applies to something that's going to go off in a yucky but not dangerous way. Sour Cream is a good example...It's already off. Off is what you're paying for. It's not going to get more off in a way that doesn't include some pretty disgusting looking mold. Ketchup. It's good for about two years unrefrigerated...You'll know ...


2

Throw them away. I would not expect potatoes to go black in the dehydration process, and although they may be safe to eat I would not expect them to be palatable, or inviting in any way. You cannot be sure they aren't toxic, and you wouldn't put them on a guest's plate, so chuck them.


2

Discard the contents of the pan in the trash. Wash the pan with hot water and soap. All will be well once you've done this. There is no reason to be concerned about which particular pathogens you tossed in the trash and washed down the drain. You can safely assume it was a few of all of them.


1

Your risk is likely lower than that of Americans, as your user info lists you being in the Netherlands. European chickens are often innoculated against salmonella, which brings down the risk significantly. I would ask your mother-in-law to be certain if this is the case, especially if she's in another country (eg, if you're near the Netherlands / Belgium ...


-2

There is very little chance of bacteria with it being in the fridge. Yes, reheating the pan to a temperature over 175 will kill any bacteria that may exist.


2

The color on the potatoes is attributable to the oxidation that's a natural degradation process. The main cause is the direct exposure with open air but other factors can accelerate it (even the metal on the knife or the food processor's blades in your case). Some vegetables are more susceptible than others (for example, avocados turn black in a matter of ...


3

The recommendations (in the US at least) are based on a risk model, which takes into account a number of factors: frequency of outbreaks and occurrence of illnesses severity of illness, taking into account illness duration, hospitalization and mortality likelihood of contamination growth potential/shelf life manufacturing process contamination ...


1

The real goal is for the lid to turn concave. They're manufactured to be convex (sticking up in the middle). If they're concave on the jar, that means there's a difference in pressure between the inside and outside of the jar causing the lid to be sucked downward. If the jar has cooled significantly, and the lid is still convex, you could try pushing down ...


2

There's no real exact time it happens (at least in my kitchen). I've had some jars that come out of the water with the lid depressed and others that take many hours. By the next morning, they should be cooled with the lids depressed. If they aren't, then they should be reprocessed or refrigerated to be eaten right away. :)



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