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2

I always taste food, all the time, all throughout the cooking process. It is the only way to know if you are serving something that is good or not. What I do, is "clean as you go". As you are preparing a meal, you should not end up with a mountain of dirty dishes afterwards. All of that should be cleaned as your cooking. Therefore, if you practice this, ...


3

Clearly, the Blendtec, "will it blend" videos, are a marketing tool designed to illustrate the power of the product, as opposed to illustrating recipes for delicious smoothies. Is it safe to drink? There is nothing here: http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/ that I have been able to find, which deems the "woody part" inedible or unsafe. So, strictly ...


0

People have been storing food in tins for generations with no negative effect. I remember crackers being sold in tins when I was a kid. Have at it. You'll be fine. You may not want to store moist food in it once you start seeing rust though.


3

I raise my own pigs and don't feed them any fish. I feed all kinds of fruit, avos, eggs, acacia tree leaves, red apple succulent etc. All past pigs were excellent and not fishy. I never had the fish taste problem before this"girl" pig. It tastes like fish when cooked. It is like fresh fish, not fishy bad fish. It does not smell like fish or good or bad. I ...


0

Defrosting haggis is no different to defrosting any other perishable food. It shouldn't be at room temperature for more than 2 hours. That means: Defrosting in the fridge for 24 hours Defrosting by running it under cold water for no more than 2 hours, then cooking it straight away. There really is no problem with cooking haggis from frozen (or after ...


2

Re-freezing is typically referred to in a different context. E.g., you took the something out of the freezer, let it thaw, and then put it back in the freezer in its original state. Technically you are not 're-freezing' the bacon. You took the bacon out of the freezer and used it in your rouladen. Now you are freezing the rouladen. It would be the same if ...


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Plant matter + heat + moisture = potential bacterial growth in only a few hours. Don't reheat tea, unsafe and pretty gross. If you can't afford the tea you use, buy cheaper tea. Single caveat, if it's continuously steeping and being drunk then no biggie. But if you're talking about leaving it out, don't do that.


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I agree with Jolenealaska. Bacon is a salted meat and mustard contains vinegar which helps in the preservation of meat and foods. Therefore; I believe you should be fine.


1

Yep, that is safe. If safe food is frozen and kept frozen (at or lower than that 0F, which home freezers typically are), the food will remain safe indefinitely. Some foods take a quality hit being refrozen, but safety is not a concern. Every entry in the Still Tasty database (the FDA, CDC and USDA site) has a comment to that effect. Watch your time in the ...


3

What you want is something that is listed as NSF rated for food storage. I know both Huskie and Rubbermaid Brute containers (10 gal, 20 gal, 32 gal, 55 gal) that are gray, yellow or white have that rating. If you have a restaurant supply store in your area, you could go look around for "ingredient bins" and commercial garbage cans. Just remember, a white ...


-1

I would place those used tea bags in the freezer until you are ready to reuse.


2

All plastic is "food safe". The term "food safe" has been much abused in recent years because of a perceived risk of leeching of certain chemical from the plastic into acidic foods, or into hot foods Actual studies have shown this problem to be below the recognised safe levels, and/or to happen at much higher heat than reported What is really of concern, ...


2

To quote from your own source: It’s best to plan ahead for slow, safe thawing in the refrigerator. After defrosting bacon by this method, it will be safe in the refrigerator for 7 days before cooking. If you decide not to use the bacon during this time, you can safely refreeze it without cooking it first. And, further up: It’s not important if a ...


0

If I left food out of the refrigerator for some period of time, is it still safe? It all depends on measures you have taken to prevent spoiling. There a fair few types of charcuterie that is aged for anywhere from a week to several months. So in a general sense yes CERTAIN foods can be safe to eat even when not refrigerated. The thing is these foods ...


5

Onions shouldn't degrade that quickly at room temperature anyhow, even if they weren't partially dried. This food safety and preservation site specifically addresses inadequately dried foods: Check containers within seven to 10 days to see if moisture is present. If you see moisture, remove food and redry at 140 to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. If food is ...


0

Darkening could be caused by several factors including: Stored too warm, too little sugar in the recipe & improper sealing. More details here Canning Questions Open kettle canning (filling hot jars with hot ingredients) is no longer recommended due to a higher likelihood of spoilage. While your jam may not spoil, you may not be removing enough air to ...


1

What turns your jam brown is the same substance that turns cut fruit brown: Oxygen. The head space in your jars is filled with air, albeit less than at normal pressure. A jam jar has no genuine vacuum (= nothing there), but low pressure. To decrease the amount of oxygen that can react with your jam, you need to reduce the amount of air in the headspace. ...


3

Turning brown on top is usually a sign of too much oxygen in the jar. The NCHFP FAQ covers this exact topic (search for "dark"). There are a few primary causes: too much headspace, or bubbles left in the jam before processing; not enough liquid to cover bits of food/fruit; or not enough processing time. All of these result in the surface of the jam ...


0

Sterilization of the jars is of the utmost importance. This sounds like some sort of bug has been let loose on your concoctions and has ruined everything. Some people think that you can sterilize the jars in a dish washer but I would not chance it. I boil my glass jars in a big 5 liter pot of water to ensure everything is sterile. Also you need to close ...


3

OK, so I left one of the butters (the Kerrygold) out for a little while longer to see if it would affect the taste. I tried it again the day after taking it out of the freezer and the sour notes disappeared! So I guess my freezer isn't the culprit after all. Here are the possibilities as I see them: The first butter (Plugra) was, in fact, a bit rancid. ...


0

I have grown potatoes in my garden for years. In my experience, soft potatoes aren't necessarily bad, it merely means they will be bad soon. They should be used as quickly as possible. I read in several posts that green potatoes have gone bad. I'm not certain if they were speaking about a green mold or some other green substance that has appeared on the ...


4

Safety-wise: If the food is heated at least to 180° F/ 80°C, I'd like to cite Jefromi But if you're just cooking for yourself I personally wouldn't really worry about it, because in general you'll be cooking the food at a safe temperature, not just above the danger zone (140F/60C) but something safe for all meat (180F/80C) so whatever bacteria you ...


-1

Yes I would say there is a problem with sampling food and then putting the spoon back in the food. The food would now be contaminated with any bacteria this person was carrying around in their mouth. Not to mention the germ factor. As to spoiling faster I don't think that would make a difference. Maybe you should talk to your guest about doing this.


0

There are many health concerns with sampling food with a spoon and putting it back in the food. Saliva contains microorganisms/bacteria that may be harmful to us especially high risk individuals(pregnant persons,the elderly,those who are Ill) Pathogens can cause food borne illnesses or infections. Therefore it is better to practise safe food handling ...


1

A floater does not indicate a rotten egg. It only indicates an old egg. When a chicken lays an egg there is no air inside. The shell is porous and over time water will evaporate out of the egg leaving an air pocket at one end. If you're concerned, crack the egg into a small bowl and smell it. If it smalls bad, discard. Remember, cooking will kill salmonella ...


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-3

Salmonella is a bacteria only found in the intestinal tract of chickens. No other birds contain this bacteria; if they do it is from cross contamination with chicken feces. Also, duck is not poultry, it is fowl. Fowl flies, poultry does not.


-1

never try to thaw it in microwave or a regular oven. It will change the taste of the beef in a bad way as the protein would get denatured due to sudden change in temperatures. You might actually thaw it just by keeping it under running water, it would hardly take 10-15 min.


1

You can of course try to thaw it in your microwave (if you have one) or in your regular oven on low heat. However, I've never had any problems cooking with frozen ground beef. Just cook it on fairly low-medium heat and scrape off the outer layers as they get thawed. This might be easier and take a shorter amount of time if you manage to split it into smaller ...


-2

At home, If the ham was left out, I would be more concerned with its environment given these timeframes. Was it covered, human/pet/insect Traffic, was it handled/sliced, served or whole, etc. If it was fully cooked, uncut/unserved, covered, and at room temps, I would eat it and even serve it to family. There are other risks that exceed the risk of ...


3

A copyright date isn't a good way to determine the age of the food. It's likely that the copyright date is much older unless the design is very recent. As far as whether it goes bad, StillTasty gives it 1 year past its date, unopened.


0

Simply, anything is possible. When you introduce a foreign object into a recipe, you don't know for sure what you are bringing into the fold. Regardless of whether these tins are made to be sterile themselves, there is no telling what was resting against the lid in question. I won't enumerate the possibilities of contagions. To put it another way, if ...


6

Use a Vacuum Flask An every-day thermos is not big enough for this task, but food service professionals have provided hot coffee and tea with larger purpose built containers. Background In China boiling water is often put in large (maybe about 3 liters) vacuum flasks. These are used at tea conventions, on trains, and at roadside stops. The water stays ...


5

Is it mold? It definitely is. Whatever happened to it, it is bad. Are the batch and mother salvageable? I wouldn't think of that for a second. The mold is everywhere. Just get rid of it.


9

You need a Thermette (Kelly Kettle or Storm Kettle in North America - they're all brand names). This would match the vintage theme. Larger ones have taps near the base, and can boil 10 cups of tea in a few minutes. These were coveted by construction and rail road worker gangs, as they could have a 10 minute break for a cup of tea and a biscuit (cookie in ...


3

If your event is (a) outdoors (b) in a warm climate... you could have some fun with (and attract a fair bit of attention to your booth..) with a solar heating method. There are several videos available online to show you how to do this, one example is from the king of random but a quick google search will reveal many ways boil water.


16

Do as others do and use a camping stove. They come as gas stoves like this one or even as wood- or charcoal-fired versions (see here). Perhaps an avid camper among your friends could even lend you one, means you'd only have to buy the fuel. But before you do this check with the local authorities / people responsible for the event whether they are ok with ...


0

Modern "tin cans" are made from rolled steel covered with epoxy plastic Epoxy plastic may release potential carcinogens when heated somewhat above 100°C, and it is not recommended by their manufactures to do so for food purposes In this case it will be fine assuming a water (tomatoes?) based liquid sauce


2

Very unlikely. Cans are made from either steel (uncritical) or aluminum (dito), covered with a thin layer of tin (dito) or epoxy coating. These materials are explicitly choosen because they are food-safe1, even at higher temperatures than you use with home cooking: Tin cans are sterilized after filling to make the food inside shelf-stable. So the only way ...


0

That's just the air in the package expanding, as it goes from freezer temperature to room temperature. It sounds like you're thinking of the fact that water expands when it freezes (and shrinks when it melts) but that's not what's happening here. The air warms up long before the ice starts melting. Some freezer packaging has small holes in it (or not so ...


-1

In my marinades i use soy sauce lime or lemon and rice wine vinegar with sesame oil and Korean sweet and spicy sauce and sesame ginger mix in a heafty zipper locking bag and drain out as much air as possible and it holds up to a good week before the meat gets a off putting color


0

as far as I know, Lactic acid (byproduct of fermenting yeast or bacteria) this is a natural preservative that inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria. In my case I know a person that actually make cheese in the same way you accidentally did. So to my knowledge once the milk doesn't smell bad you are good to go.



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