New answers tagged

1

I am not aware of any official guideline on storing drinking water, probably because people just don't do it usually. But for other purposes of water storage (humidifiers etc.) the rule of thumb is that water which will sit around for more than a week has to be treated. If anything, the rules for drinking water should be shorter (because you can have ...


0

Actually it dependence from various others factors. For example water the chlorination of water. How much chorion are in. Then from the area that is bottled. What kind of microorganism are in the air and or the bottle. From the time of the year. Winter or summer. Summer is hotter so more and faster growing microorganism. From the type of the bottle. If it ...


-1

There are equal concerns with fresh and now apparently even frozen vegies in the US. I have not seen food packaged this way although each food has an equal concern. I will address only the vegetables, but note that given current concerns, just tossing out the pretty greens that have touched the meat would not address the issue, if the meat is not going to ...


-1

No, feta does not last that long. Once it is out of the brine, you have to treat it as a perishable food.


-4

The other answers seem to focus on the cross-contamination issue, with the raw beef being unsafe. Let me point out that beef cuts are often served rare, as it is in your illustration of the dish, and that is considered fine. So I really don't think there is much of an issue here. (Raw ground meat, from a factory setting, and undercooked pork are far more ...


-1

Should be fine. You have seen no sign of change in the cheese. Remember, making cheese is a way of preserving milk. And feta is cured in brine -- salt is a further preservative.


29

What you're looking at is called (in the US) "cross contamination". You have a food generally considered "unsafe" (beef) that is coming into contact with a food generally considered "safe" (salad greens). This contact makes the greens "unsafe" to consume raw. Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting ...


15

No, it's not safe to eat those greens without cooking, for exactly the same reason it's unsafe to eat the meat that's touching them without cooking it. If you have to cook the meat before eating to make it safe, you would have to cook anything it's touched to make it safe. Maybe it's not quite as risky as eating the meat, but it's still risky. They could ...


0

Listeria can be present and does not die when frozen. http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2016/06/update-producer-others-recall-frozen-vegetables-for-listeria/#.V2ilB9UrLnB


4

A major reason produce can be sold loose without tongs is that you're supposed to wash it just before preparing it anyway. You couldn't wash your baked goods. How effective this washing is, is of course another matter now we don't have to wash the mud off and a token rinse is probably typical. Some produce, including mushrooms but also strawberries etc., ...


2

There isn't anything special, there is no reason they should be treated any differently than other exposed and handled foods. It's not the food that is dangerous, it's the human based disease that is spread by food handling that is the issue. I don't advocate gloves in food handling, I advocate good hand washing. Gloves make people sloppy and I think it ...


1

If you ever spent time in a hospital setting, you would have been instructed to place cups/glassware right-side up in cupboards to prevent contamination from germs. It makes sense. You put your lips against the rim, but never ever lick the bottom of a cup or glass.


0

This is normal as the salt and sugar are Hydroscopic i.e. the absorb moisture the preserving of gravlax is by removing moisture if you find the texture is tough or dry try adding more sugar I found the best combination for Buried Salmon I.E. Grave ( no explanation Needed ) Lax (Swedish for Salmon ) 2 parts salt 1 part sugar


1

Yes it is normal. The salt (and sugar) will "extract" the water from the fish meat. [...]On a technical level, what both the salt and sugar do is draw moisture out of the fish through osmosis. This decreases the moisture level of the fish, which in turn makes it less hospitable to microbial life. The salt, meanwhile, also helps ward off bacteria that would ...


4

I agree with the comment by Richard ten Brink: you can't really do this in a home freezer and expect good results. Even with a large home chest freezer, it will take way too long for a whole carcass to freeze all the way through. Freezing requires a lot more energy than maintaining something that's already frozen, and the process for a pig carcass would ...


2

It is safe to drink the tea made from tea leaves and it's safe if you eat the tea leaves themselves at the bottom of the cup. People avoid eating the leaves because they aren't pleasant tasting, the consistency isn't very nice, and they aren't that easy to digest.


0

After further searching, I eventually found some answers, which was the following Google search string matcha with white tea https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=matcha&oq=matcha&aqs=chrome..69i57.489j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=matcha+with+white+tea Since this comes back with valid results I feel this is safe enough to assume it's ...


1

The answer is related to a similar issue appearing in this question. Basically, that residue is mostly water, along with denatured proteins from the meat. When meat is cooked and the cells expel moisture, there are a lot of dissolved proteins which sometimes make the liquid light-colored and thick. People tend to notice it more with certain meats than ...


2

I think it may often just be fat/protein slime. Unfortunately, that's going to be hard to distinguish safe fat/protein slime from bad bacterial slime, so this is probably yet another time where you'll have to use your best judgment. If it's well before the sell-by date and has been handled properly, it shouldn't have dangerous spoilage. There should ...


0

I strongly believe the sliminess of otherwise healthful sliced luncheon meats results from water added during processing. The food processor/manufacturer endeavors to inject as much water in the product as possible ... because selling water to their customers adds to their bottom line, and quite nicely. Here's some info, to consider when looking for ...


0

Yes it is indeed possible. The available starches that have dissolved in the water are a super convenient place for the bacteria that is naturally found on foods to grow. I'd say for grits 2 days soak is the limit, they can start to fall apart after that. The ultimate test is the smell test, if it smells sour then it has started to turn. This is how I ...


0

Food grade CO2 is not meant for human consumption. For that, you should use Beverage Grade, which is more pure than Medical Grade. Both major soft drink companies have Beverage Grade as their minimum guideline. Food Grade CO2 is a dirty gas that isn't tested for several carcinogens...because it isn't meant to be ingested. You need to go to CO2 providers ...


0

I've been told that lead or tin, used to solder/seal the side seam of a can, would oxidize when exposed to air and lead to (mild) lead poisoning. But cans are no longer sealed with lead these days, so: an old tale but not an old wives tale....


0

from the Vermont dept of Health: Salmonella organisms have been found in the stools of sick and apparently healthy people and animals. Most domestic animals, including ducks, cattle, swine, dogs, cats, pet turtles and chicks have been found to carry and transmit salmonella. The bacteria also has been found in a variety of wild animals. Thorough hand ...


2

No, definitely not. It's not possible to safely preserve meat by boiling alone. The only way to do this kind of thing at home is with a pressure canner, which lets you reach higher temperatures to properly kill everything dangerous. See for example the NCHFP advice on canning meats.



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