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0

Puffed Rice treats can be stored at room temperature in air tight containment (zip-top bag with no air in it), for 1 to 2 days without any ill effect. They keep longer than they last, if you get my drift.


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You can refrigerate them. They turn to bricks, but if take them out of the fridge an hour before eating, they go back to a normal texture. They haven't lasted more than two days for me so I don't know how they will be for longer than that.


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It is safe to consume the guts. Many people do. More Info: After digging deeper into the above article I spotted it contains the answer. http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/oct/07/features.food7 They're so small (only up to 12cm long) that they're often cooked whole - head, guts and all. If you prefer, however, you can open up the belly with ...


-2

In my opinion, it is dangerous. I won't try.


3

Yes and no; in smaller quantities; no problem. If you sit down in the morning and eat bowl daily; you will cause some serious long term issues. Raw flour is full of lectins and phytates; which can pose a danger in higher amounts; damage the lower GI and cause IBS; other issues Nutrient problems can develop from the raw flour intake at higher amounts ...


0

One should only defrost once. Refreezing defrosted proteins results in loss of texture and flavor (regardless of the marinade.) The acidic component of your marinade is not enough to stave off the possibility of bacterial contamination. Why not just defrost your chicken breasts, place them in the marinade, and cook them off after several hours. You could ...


2

Nobody is telling you "or you'll get sick" What they are telling you that it's unsafe. This is a completely different thing. You can eat unsafe food if you like. The people who publish unsafe recipes do it too. They just count on not getting sick. 2 hours vs 4 hours The actual "danger zone" time is 4 hours. For foods you buy in their final, perishable ...


-3

I have bin a chef for 35 years & have never seen slime like this on any of the thousands of green onion i have prepared until today .& anyone that tells me this is normal is lying,slime has bin & always will be a sign that the food is not eatable . In my opinion this is another product of food engineering (AKA: G.M.O) & that is something that ...


8

The biggest concern with fish caught in the wild is the presence of parasites. You'll have to look up which species of parasite are present in the species of fish that you wish to use, and treat it accordingly. Tapeworm is common in salmon, and several other varieties of fish have various parasites capable of infecting a human host. Most sites I've seen ...


0

According to my knowledge, to avoid risk of catching some nasty virus (e.g. anisakis) it's better to put in the freezer and then defrost. This procedure will kill them.


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a farmer in Michigan told me to choose an acorn squash that is green with some orange on the bottom. He said this is the perfect ripeness


2

1) A "market" size pig, i.e. one they cut up and sell in pieces at the grocery store is much bigger---(250 lbs or so) than a 90 lb. "roaster." Cooking time depends on the largest cut, so a shoulder from a market pig will be larger than the shoulder from a roaster, thus taking longer to cook; 2) 25 degrees does make a very big difference in cooking--yes, ...


0

soak it water for 1 hour then blanch to pull some of the surface starches away rinse - they wont turn black


0

Whether or not food has mold visually is a different story than if the food should be thrown away anyway for health reasons - just because you can't see anything, doesn't mean it isn't there. 4 days sounds about right - you should throw away leftovers around this timeframe even if mold is not visible unless the food is stored in the freezer. Mold grows ...


-2

All the time. Hand sanitizer on fast food sandwiches especially. Just opened Gorton's new Parmesan crusted frozen cod and couldn't even stay in the room the filets smelled so much like soap - strong detergent. Even the outer sleeve box I had to throw in other room it was so off gassing.


2

The radioactivity from bananas comes from Potassium and it's not possible to die from eating a particular dose. It may actually be possible to die from being in contact with bananas over a prolonged period of time, but you would need to spend decades around thousands of them. Your body already contains a certain amount of potassium and when you eat ...


2

Wikipedia's article on the Sievert, a unit used to measure radiation, tells us a banana's output measures about 0.098 μSv. The lowest fatal dose listed is 4.5 Sv. So we know the radiation from forty-six million bananas would be enough to kill. Annual world production of bananas is around 18 million tonnes, and at 125g per banana, that's enough to kill ...


0

It looks like a popular solution is a good ice chest with heated bricks. I found several variations of this technique on various sites. It's an improvement over simply insulating since you have a lot of additional thermal mass and it's starting out at a much higher temperature. You wrap the bricks in foil and heat them in the oven (e.g. 30 minutes at 450F) ...


0

And then there is this one, out of Dutch antiquity. It really, really works. http://www.rootsimple.com/2011/12/hay-boxes-or-fireless-cookers


1

At least in the UK bivalves are treated with uv light which takes care of nasty hepatitis a etc. Logically a bivalve has to contract it's muscle to close therefore an open one before cooking is dead but not necessarily bad - we serve most other meats dead. I had a batch once where half were open on arrival and they tasted just fine ...I couldn't bear ...


0

According to eatbydate.com Feta Cheese should last a week past its printed date in the refrigerator unopened. The site suggests that soft cheeses do not have a long shelf life.


0

I was taught that keeping opened canned food in the fridge leads to botulism.


1

I wouldn't claim to be an expert, nor would I want to give bad health advice. But generally, it's easy to tell if a cheese is still safe to eat - if, as you said, it doesn't have mold that isn't supposed to be there, and doesn't smell. If it were me, I'd eat it as long as it still has the same texture, color, and smell as it started with.


2

You are correct in saying using color to determine doneness is less reliable in older meat. As the meat is exposed to air, it oxidizes giving it a brownish color. When checking for doneness, people sometimes see this oxidized brown color and mistaken it for being fully cooked through. However, this can occur for fresher meats also. According to the USDA ...


-2

No egg is safer when it’s raw. It will give you SALMONELLA POISONING AND THE INFECTION which is in the ENTEROBACTERIACEAE family and in the GAMMAPROTEOBACTERIA class Your friend may have gotten it but he just did not know because it does not affect you right away after you consume it. Please be safe: he runs the risk of contracting it while drinking it raw. ...


5

Before steaming the clams, they should all be closed. If any of your clams are open, give them a tap and if they stay open, then it is bad and you should take it out of your batch to prevent it from ruining the other clams. After you have steamed the clams, most of them should be open. The few clams that stay closed doesn't necessarily mean they are bad. ...


1

The long drive is easy. There are 12 volt cooler/warmers available that would cover that need. But you have to do your homework. I found several that say they heat to 140° F or above, but I did see a couple that don't go over 135° F. There are also reusable hot and cold packs that can be used in an insulated cooler or carrier that will keep food safe for 4 - ...


1

I'd recommend using ABS for food tools, as well as cleaning in the dishwasher. The heat from the dishwasher will kill whatever contaminants you might encounter and the ABS plastic has a high enough melting point to avoid being ruined. PLA will just melt in the dishwasher and some cookie cutters have details you won't be able to clean properly by hand without ...


4

Jerky does not need to be pre-cooked, in fact the process of making jerky probably predates the invention of cooking. The process of salting and drying (and additionally adding sugar, acid, and/or smoke) inherently kills or inhibits growth of bacteria and mold. As long as your meat is cut thin, evenly salted, and well dried you do not need to pre-cook it. ...


-2

you'll be fine. cheese is mold after all.


1

I would chunk it, better to waste it than risk illness. Fresh garlic and olive oil left at room temperature for a significant amount of time (not like the 10 minutes it might sit during prep for addition to soup, pasta, etc.) makes a prime breeding ground for botulism. Potentially dangerous things like this shouldn't sit out longer than 2 hours at room ...


-1

Any food product with a pH higher (less acidic) than 4.0 must be pressure canned to guard against botulism, which can be odorless, tasteless and deadly. Botulism can grow at pH 4.6. I bought pH strips (they're very cheap insurance) and test each batch of food prior to bottling. Foods that are sufficiently high acid (pH 4.0 or less) and therefore not a ...



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