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1

There's no real exact time it happens (at least in my kitchen). I've had some jars that come out of the water with the lid depressed and others that take many hours. By the next morning, they should be cooled with the lids depressed. If they aren't, then they should be reprocessed or refrigerated to be eaten right away. :)


1

Only for your information. The spanish ham can get moldy every time, because the curing process will not stop. And for sure you can eat after cleaning with oil. All this ham have mould but before it is sold they also clean it with oil or fat. Mostly the customer don't see it, but sometimes because of the humidity or if it is hot it can appear again, but it ...


0

I do like the claws and tail but the body is my big love. I adore picking it apart and finding that sweet meat as you break the body apart. It is tedious and only small amounts of meat but so good!!! I also like to take the roe and tomalie or lobster paste and put it with a bit of butter on a piece of fish and bake it, it then tastes like lobster!


0

Silver sulfide, AKA tarnish, has a solubility of 0.14 mg/L (0.14 ppm), and takes a long time to dissolve. EPA action levels are much higher: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that the concentration of silver in public drinking water supplies not exceed one milligram per liter of water — one part per million — because of the skin ...


3

Your assumption that there is nothing living inside the package is incorrect. Food irradiation does not sterilise the food. It is very, but not totally effective. Therefore, given enough time, the meat will still spoil. Irradiation does effect the quality of the food, so I imagine a balance needs to be struck between safety and quality.


4

No, your reasoning is incorrect. Food safety rules are dumbed down because they have to be taken literally without any reasoning. if the temperature is very high all the time during that time, I think the maximum time is shorter. The maximum holding time isn't shorter for higher temperatures. It is the time at which food is legally safe, and it is ...


0

I've been using the inversion method for many years. But when giving them as gifts I tell them to use it right away, and any jars with a failed seal go in the garbage. I make fabulous combinations of jams (peach - raspberry - habanero for example). I do boil & sterilize jars prior to filling as well as the lids. As I'm filling jars, if any seem ...


0

Was the limestone and hay wrapper cracked or the egg shells? Century eggs are really only a few weeks-months old, actually. Though they do keep for long periods at room temperature. They're also damn tasty and have a lot of ammonia i.e. Very high PH (basic) so unlikely to spoil.


1

Working in a professional kitchen where we cooked eggs in various styles. I would say from my experience: Hard boiled eggs will keep for 4 days refrigerated in the shell, before they become unpalatable. Soft boiled eggs(hard whites, creamy yolks) will keep in the shell, refrigerated for 2 days. Poached eggs, properly cooled in ice water and drained, ...


-2

I remember my mother defrosting most meat from the freezer on the counter. She would take it out when she came home from work for lunch, and it would be ready to cook when she got home. We never got sick. But that was almost 50 years ago when bacteria wasn't as prevalent or resistant as it is today. Greed and selfishness in the forms of people not being ...


1

It depends on how long it's been out. I've seen mold form the second day to "plain" unflavored coffee (no milk, no sugar). I've kept refrigerated brewed flavored coffee in an air-tight container for a week or more without problems. (I add a bit to unflavored hot coffee so the flavor isn't overwhelming).


2

According to NRAEF food safety standards, it should be thrown out. Anything that can potentially grow bacteria should be thrown out if it has been left in what's called the Temperature Danger Zone (40-140F) for more than 6 hours. The dairy added to the coffee in question was an ideal culture for bacterial development at room temperature. All things ...


1

Aaronut's answer is fine, I'm just coming at it from a slightly different assumption. Sandwiches like these are common in gas stations and convenience stores in the US. You can buy them in multi-packs at grocery stores or places like Costco. In multi-packs they are sold frozen, in convenience stores they have often been defrosted. They're perfectly ...


1

Freezing extends the safe storage lifetime of any food. I would have to assume that a frozen sandwich may have been frozen for a long time and therefore probably isn't the best quality, but it isn't any less safe than a refrigerated, "fresh" sandwich - in fact it's probably safer, although the operative word is "probably" - that's not necessarily true unless ...


2

If you have sanitary concerns about taste-testing, you could do what I do: Use the main spoon/utensil to transfer a small amount to a bowl/plate. Use a second utensil (like a small spoon or fork) to taste from this bowl or plate. This allows you to reuse your secondary tasting utensil without it ever touching your main utensil. If you're really concerned ...


1

(This probably should be a comment but it's too long) If you don't taste you can end up with something very wrong without knowing it: My mother had allergy issues that kept her from tasting what she was preparing, she was also blind which meant the only labels she could read were the ones she put on things. One day she baked some oatmeal cookies. My ...


4

Sorry that I can't comment as a guest, since this does not truly answer the question of whether to taste test or not. One can reduce the number of spoons used to taste test by using a system of two spoons; one spoon goes into the dish while the other is tasted from. This way, after spooning from the first spoon to the second, the first can be put in the ...


24

Any halfway competent chef should indeed be tasting. The only way to know whether you're putting up good food is to check it yourself - and you'd better be consistent if you want to continue getting paid for it. That's not to say that all chefs do, nor that there's any one standard for how frequently to taste or what method should be used. It's pretty ...


23

Yes, chefs and cooks taste the food they prepare; even an experienced chef will do this, mostly to check seasoning (salt, pepper, etc.). However, most experienced cooks will taste less and will know how to tweak the preparation without having to constantly taste and re-taste. Cooks usually use spoons - tons of spoons - to taste food when they prepare it. ...


11

Certainly cooks should taste their food as they go, especially if they're making something they haven't made many times before. "Double-dipping" is common (even in commercial kitchens). It's the kind of thing a lot of people do, but no one wants to get caught doing it. This question is related: Food safety when tasting from dish, and you might find the ...


0

Yes it is :) When I was a kid , we used to have fresh tender coconut from our tress and after drinking the water , we used to cut open the coconut and have the coconut. Like wise its even the same with the coconut in store. But since they are packaged and handle my many, just rinse it before eating .


2

There is no need for such a table, so I doubt that you'll find it. There are two types of food, food which is spoiled by disease-causing organisms, and food which is spoiled by other mechanisms or not at all. Food which is spoiled by disease-causing organisms has the same safe shelf life outside of the fridge: 2 hours. Anything above it is considered ...


2

IMO, stated again, IMO... It is an old research paper (1967) about mostly transformed (grated and dried) coconut. A quick googling does not really give more warnings for whole coconuts (FDA or other sources). Like all things "exotic", wash the exterior under clean water before opening and use properly clean knives and other kitchen tools. Enjoy the ...


1

Don't forget about fats and oils going rancid in the freezer! This is due to oxygen being in the package with the food. To extend the life of frozen items, the air (with its oxygen) has to be removed from the package and the packaging must be well sealed. Remove all air by squeezing, vacuuming, or displacing it with extra liquid broth or water so there's ...


2

What kind of meat is it, maybe pork? There are many kinds of pathogens in meat. One type are bacteria. They don't die from cold temperatures (not even freezing), but die from high heat. Unfortunately, heating the meat throughout so it's hot enough to kill all bacteria will turn it into a shoesole. So, meat is cooked to slightly lower temperatures which are ...



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