Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Bleach (1-10% depending how bad the fridge is) water, rag or sponge, wipe clean, wipe off/dry, rinse with plain water, wipe clean/dry. Ideally park all the food in a cooler so you can air the fridge out throughly after cleaning.


1

The StillTasty link you give for the sausages is for all types of fresh, raw sausages, not just pork. That's why it's labeled "SAUSAGES (INCLUDING PORK, BEEF, CHICKEN OR TURKEY) — FRESH, RAW". Most likely, they're getting the 1–2-day limit from the chicken sausages (which are likely to have a higher initial bacteria load than pork or beef). Note that they ...


0

I try to clean shelves regularly so the sludge doesn't get too thick, but if it did get thick, I would probably break out the steam cleaner. It's great for cutting through thick dried-on sludge. I would be careful of any glass, however, because the temperature shock might break it (most glass shelves are removable, though).


1

There are specialized "fridge cleaners" in the drugstore, but if you take a look at the ingredients list, you'll find out that you are paying lots of money for a small amount of alcohol and tensides. You can follow GdD's advice and use soap, then wash it off, then wipe it dry Other cleaners such as window cleaner can also be used, they are safe enough - ...


3

You have to wash cleaners off, there's no other way to remove the dirt. The gunk is not going to magically evaporate, you will have to wipe. If your fridge is really dirty then I suggest a tub of soapy (dish soap) water, a sponge to clean and wipe, and a towel to dry. If it's not that bad then a kitchen safe spray cleaner and a sponge or paper towels will do ...


2

Yes, you can freeze cooked chicken, no problem. As long as you follow safe food handling techniques, it is perfectly safe to defrost it for eating later. Since it has already been cooked, you do not need to bring it back up to 165 deg F. Just get it to the temperature at which you want to eat it, and enjoy! Do keep in mind that when you defrost your ...


4

The whole point of canning is to produce food that won't spoil. The only reason to boil canned food is if you think it was improperly canned, and if that's true, it may not be safe to eat even if boiled. Botulism bacteria, for example, will grow in many improperly canned foods, and it will not be completely destroyed by boiling, though most of the botulism ...


1

Assuming food-safe seeds (are there basil seeds that aren't?), yes it is safe, both to drink the water and to eat the seeds. That's the point. Just now I have been experimenting with different ways to drink soaked Sacred Basil seeds. Other types of basil seeds seem to work just the same way, as evidenced by the results of an Amazon search for "basil seeds ...


1

If the basil seeds are safe, the water should be also safe. If you have food-grade basil seeds (i.e. non-teated seeds) and didn't soak them for too long (so pathogens had enough time to grow), this should be safe. I think soaked basil seed last as long as soaked chia seeds, 2 weeks. There are even desserts / drinks with basil seeds and the water in which ...


2

I've cooked lots of meat in my President's Choice rice maker, which comes equipped with a steaming tray. The rice cooks for about 50 minutes, and if it senses there's extra water or moisture in there, it will keep extending the time by 1 minute. I have literally thrown entire 1.5" thick pork chops in there, chicken leg quarters, a small sirloin roast, all ...


3

This shouldn't be a safety concern. Bacteria could certainly be introduced (if you use your hands to add the pepper or a cross-contaminated utensil), however, the acidic environment of the pickling liquid should keep any possible bacterial growth in check. The other contaminant to consider would be botulism, but again, in a pickling environment (high ...


3

The reason to not reuse marinade is not because "it has been sitting around", it's because it would be cross-contamination, as Chef_Code said. It doesn't matter how long you have used it. The moment the chicken touched it, the bacteria on the chicken surface - and there are lots of them - were also in the marinade. If you now dump fish pieces in it, you'll ...


0

Salt your food well. See for example this article (paywall, but the abstract is sufficient). You are unlikely to have calcium chloride in your kitchen, so you probably can't use the divalent cations route. But "monovalent cations, such as Na+, almost halved the acrylamide formed in the model system". Now, a model system is not a pan, but they at least ...


-1

First off here is my source www.cancer.org Acrylamide does not appear to be in raw foods themselves. It is formed when certain starchy foods are cooked at temperatures above about 250° F. Cooking methods such as frying, baking, broiling, or roasting are more likely to produce acrylamide, while boiling, steaming, and microwaving appear less likely to do so. ...


-1

And a year later, the definitive answer: There is a difference, but not one you need to care about. CO2 is used when packaging red meat and other foodstuff to prevent the color to turn gray. Oxygen caused this change. Food grade CO2 therefore is specified with very little oxygen. Industrial CO2 is not guaranteed to have very little oxygen. Oxygen is of no ...


1

Don't use any food containing: alcohol acids (lemon juice, vinegar, ...) oils (butter, mayonnaise, cream, ...) So a salad without oil&vinegar should be safe for daily use, but ice cream, punch, pie (contains butter) etc are to be avoided. The health effects should be minimal, but you'll definitely ruin granny's beautiful set in the long run... ;-)


0

Whole salmon simply isn't a great candidate for low temp cooking in a water bath. While you can achieve excellent results with portioned salmon, cooked at 50C for well under an hour, this timing is impossible for a whole fish. It would be necessary to cook much longer. The problem is you would probably have to cook the whole fish for a couple of hours. ...


0

If you want to keep the texture of slow-cooked food at 50°C, then depending on your religion and AA status, you might add 1 glass of white wine per Kg of salmon. Disadvantage: the alcohol will not evaporate at all! Advantage: The alcohol will not evaporate at all and give additional flavour to the salmon! Personally, I use 25% fresh dill (leaves only) and ...


7

Food grade salt (Sodium Chloride) in most parts of the world is evaporated from sea water. It generally does not have any detectable mercury, though it does have many other trace elements, some of which are normal dietary minerals Mined salt (rock salt) is generally used for industrial purposes and de-icing, it contains "dirt", but generally not mercury. In ...


0

Pure polyamide is foodsafe at these temperatures, they make pan spatulas out of them, which are safe to about 200 Celsius. The problem is that we cannot know if your bag is 100% pure polyamide. It could be that the coloring is not food safe, or that it was contaminated with something inedible during production. So nobody can promise you that a nylon bag ...


0

Here is a link to the U.S. Food and Drug Administrations website regarding POLYMERS. They have done a lot of testing according to the documentation provided on this page, but you will need to match specs against the table they provide, to know for sure. Another suggestion, Submerge the bag in a very deep vessel with some purified water overnight, then ...


0

All this mumbo-jumbo about them being poisonous is completely true, I just wanted state that weirdly. My suggestion, throw it back into the ground and grow 25 more potatoes.


4

Mercury builds up in tuna to significant levels thanks to them eating thousands of critters that in turn eat thousands of critters with tiny little bits of mercury, and it all adding up. It's not about mercury levels in the ocean, per se. It's also a heavy metal so it's not likely to be simply floating around in the water that is evaporated to retrieve the ...


5

It's probably just limescale stuck to the bottom of your pot that blackened. I don't think burnt limescale is harmful, but it shouldn't be too hard to remove. You can try cleaning it using standard means to remove scale from kettles, like using vinegar.


0

I've eaten potatoes that were fairly soft and nothing happened to me an I'm sure everyone whose grandparents grew up in the depression ate them a lot softer than I have But that's just my opinion I could be wrong


3

Ingredients: liqueur, acidity regulator (E331), emulsifier (E471), flavours (caffeine), colouring (caramel (E150b). Source: a food product inventory database The alcohol keeps the product from microbiological spoilage, the E331 (sodium Citrate) buffers the product form getting damaged by acids produced by any spoilage, and E471 (mono and diglycerides of ...


1

My husband, myself and my son all developed terrible sickness within 4 hours of eating lightly cooked fiddleheads. We now have been diagnosed with blood parasites which will take a good month to clear. We will never eat fiddleheads again.These were served in one of Canada's top restaurants and after contacting the restaurant were telephoned by government ...


2

TLDR; Yes. Sugar does inhibit growth of mold. How does this work? Several reasons: Sugar prohibits growth through osmosis / dehydration. "The most notable is simple osmosis, or dehydration. Salt or sugar, whether in solid or aqueous form, attempts to reach equilibrium with the salt or sugar content of the food product with which it is in ...


1

Heavy Sugar syrups (including maple) are dessicants. They inhibit bacterial growth and many molds, there are however molds that grow on sugar syrups. Those sugar syrup molds however take weeks or months to develop and they'll float right on top.


5

Water activity is the big issue in preventing microorganism growth in sugary solutions. Water Activity of Foods Table     Includes limit points for various types of bugs. A few molds will grow down to 0.60Aw. Another foods Aw table Water Activity of Sucrose and NaCl Solutions     From which: 180 g sucrose + 100 g water will give you a 64% sucrose ...


1

I can try to answer that question in terms of jam (I have a glass of strawberry jam in fornt of me right now). The sugar content is about 50% in weight. So 50g sugar in 100g of strawberry jam. The label claims there are no other preservating agents in the product and that you may store it for a long time (about a year or more) in the refridgerator. The ...


5

Unless you left it open to the air it should be perfectly safe. Maple sap is thickened into syrup via boiling so any bacteria/etc. originating in it will be killed off. Thick sugary syrups also make it very hard for bacteria and mold to grow. Despite the plentiful food source, the concentrated sugar is dessicative: OK, maple syrup is wet, but it’s ...


1

Will be perfectly fine. Maple syrup does not have enough sugar to prevent mold and no preservatives, so like bread or wine, it can develop mold after 7 days or so, pending the environment. 1 or 2 days, not an issue. Typically it's what you add to syrup that causes the mold after opening. Plastic containers shorten shelf life Conisderably to about 1 ...


0

i have read in this artile that coconut oil medium chain ftty acids kill certain bacteria including botulism, although i would like more sources to confirm this so that i could make my garlic oil without worries page 72 ...


0

The discoloring isn't a problem: it's just the meat reacting with oxygen in the air. The same thing would happen, only more slowly, if you'd frozen the sausages. The problem is possible bacterial growth. By the time the bacteria levels become high enough to be visible, it's far past the point where the bacteria are dangerous. Further, many bacterial ...


1

The one on top was probably exposed to air and its surface dried out which darkened it. It's always better to be safe than sorry. I am a little more edgy and eat things others don't, but I have my limits of acceptable also. I wouldn't eat something a week old unless I was sure it was packed and stored properly.


0

If you have the carton take them back to the store when you bought them from and exchange them for a new carton or get your money back. My grandfather had a chicken ranch and if there was a problem he had no problem returning money or exchanging with eggs or both so, when in doubt, return. Most supermarkets are great at returning groceries and especially ...


0

You can serve almost any protein medium rare. I wouldn't want to eat poultry at that temperature, mind you. Cooking the protein to high temperature is not the only way to cook it safely. The high temperature kills almost all of the bacteria in seconds. But a lower temperature for a longer period of time does just as well. For instance, this chart lists ...


7

Sprouted onions are perfectly safe to eat. If far advanced the texture may not be ideal; yours does not sound very far advanced at all (not even green.) Considering you can eat green onions, there's nothing to fear from onion sprouts.


1

I don't recall seeing them unrefrigerated as far back as the 1970's, so either your big cities were slower to take up the practice than the smaller towns and cities I've frequented stores in, or your memory is fudging some numbers. The mystical magical "bloom" only works if the egg is free of fecal matter. Given a choice of bloom and fecal matter or washed ...


3

Planting will get you a better return. Cut the potatoes up into sections with a sprout each, let the cuts callus at 70 F/21C for a few days, and plant. If you remove the sprouts and the potatoes are not green, or any green parts are removed, they should be safe, if not of particularly good quality. Planting the sprouted ones and buying others to eat would ...


4

I'd be very wary of this, if only because it seems to have fermented remarkably quickly. The fizz is likely the result of carbon dioxide being produced by yeast eating the sugars in the grape juice; this is the same process that carbonates beer or sparkling wines. The thing is, most of these yeasts are introduced deliberately, and they take a while to do ...


0

It's probably safe to drink. If it's fizzy, but doesn't smell bad it's likely a natural grape yeast from the white bloom on the skin of the grapes. Wine makers test their brew by smell and taste and only use chemistry to find out how much a shift of chemistry is predicted to get it to taste the way you want.


2

If it's within it's use by date and hasn't been out of the fridge for more than 2 hours since you bought it, then yes, it should be fine. Cover it well.


1

For a small fillet of frozen fish in a ziplock bag, this method will be fine because any single serving fish fillet will only take 10 minutes or even less to defrost in warm water, and will take even less time to cook. However, as described in other answers, you cannot extend this method to larger cuts of meat like a massive t-bone steak or a giant chicken ...


0

The official answer is it's unsafe, and if you forget you food it can be. However, I defrost like this all the time. The trick is to be quick about it. Chicken can be put right in the water directly, and you can massage the frozen parts apart as the heat melts the cracks. The difference between frozen and safe zone thawed is only a few degrees. Once the ...


3

This in general can be unsafe, because the temperature of the warm water will be in the danger zone. That means that you'll be holding the surface of the food in the danger zone for the duration of the defrosting. Since you don't want to hold food in the danger zone for more than a couple hours, and that's cumulative over the whole process from fridge to ...


1

When Kombucha gets old it turns to vinegar, then one can make salad dressing out of it. I have been brewing booch for while now and that has been the ultimate out come. I double ferment with ginger and home grown berries so when mine get old, i all ready have a vinegarette waiting for me. Hope that helped


0

I had eaten a blue rare 6oz steak, cooked very briefly on the grill, both sides, and was having sever diahrreah, abdominal pain, and vomiting for 2 days before it went away. This was also in North Dakota and was cut very fresh and of the highest grade! Let's keep in mind that everyone digests food differently, some better than others (this has a lot to do ...



Top 50 recent answers are included