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1

That's ridiculous. Throwing out everything the chicken touches is just plain wasteful. Just don't cross contaminate. You can wash away bacteria, and its dies without a host. Also consider the fact that foodborne illness cannot go through your skin. Exposure to bacteria actually increases your immunity. Poultry might be prone to bacteria, but proper cooking ...


0

The USDA provides online Food Safety Information describing the risks. You can also call them with questions. Generally, two hours in the "danger zone" is OK, but keep in mind that's two hours total including time at the meat packing company, in shipping, at the store, on your way home from the store, during your preparation, and any reheating.


1

Grease makes an anaerobic environment —that is, that it lacks oxygen— and while that may prevent many types of bacteria from growing in it (Staph.,E. coli,etc.), Clostridia species (including the kind that causes botulism) are obligate anaerobes— they need to have an oxygen poor environment in which to live. Now, will all that scalding ...


5

In catering, you do not use your home fridge because your family opens and closes it so many times that the temperature drops and the food in it that is cooked does not stay at a steady temperature. For example, you said she may prepare seafood. That is a Big NO NO. The seafood should be prepared and served within hours. Think about it like this: ...


7

The question actually brings up two separate issues: (1) When did the U.S. "start refrigerating eggs on a regular basis," i.e., when did the process of refrigeration become a common practice with eggs? Answer: late 1800s (2) When did refrigerated eggs "become the norm," i.e., when did American consumers expect eggs to be always (or almost always) ...


0

Today's fryers spend their entire short lives on antibiotics, increasing the likelihood that whatever germs their little corpses carry may be antibiotic resistant. Today's fryers are raised in environments harsh and dirty enough that feeding them antibiotics all their lives is a good business investment. Food paranoia is becoming the norm. Many adults have ...


6

I don't see how anything intrinsic about chickens has changed with respect to safety. We know that chickens can carry the salmonella bacteria and that means there's always a risk of a very serious illness when handling/eating raw chicken. Having said that, being too obsessed with these risks is what seems to be happening to the younger generations. The ...


7

I don't think much has happened to washing a chicken in itself, rather much more has happened to our knowledge about bacteria, hygiene, and cross contamination. Most likely, with or without washing, nothing bad is going to happen. But then again: It might. Properly cooking the poultry is going to get rid of the bacteria on the chicken, no washing needed. ...


1

Most milk is pasteurised by bringing it to between 71 and 74C for 15 to 30 seconds. This is called High Temperature Short Time pasteurisation. Boiling milk means just that: bringing the milk to its boiling point, which is 100C. That should naturally should make it as safe as the HTST pasteurised variety as it will spend plenty of time at well over the ...


0

It depends entirely on what the actual temperature for "warm" is. If it is above 140F (i.e. outside of the "danger zone") you should be fine. The limited research I've done on the "warm" temperatures of various crock pots seem to range from 145F to 200F, so it largely depends on the model. You might want to read the manual or go to the manufacturer's web ...


3

The easiest and best solution for the problem is to not dissolve it into water in the first place. Powdered sweetener keeps indefinitely. Dissolved sweetener falls smack in the middle of FAT TOM, so you have converted a shelf stable food into an unstable one. Assuming that you want to keep it at room temperature, there is not that much you can do. You can ...


1

I have no personal experience, so I can only say what I've found on the web: There's a guide to pickling fish on the University of Minnesota website: Pickling is an easy method of preserving fish. Pickled fish must be stored in the refrigerator at no higher than 40° F (refrigerator temperature), and for best flavor must be used within four to six weeks. ...


0

It's not going to hurt anything. The apples they use for cider are usually pretty rough, so a little wrinkling isn't going cause a health issue. You very well may not get as much juice, but the juice you will get will be more concentrated. The same principle applies to grapes used for wine...Ideally they will get very little water in the weeks leading up ...


2

Summary: If the loaf is kept at an elevated temperature in a plastic bag for a period of 6-12 hours I believe you will see little to no difference compared to storing at room temperature. Stored at an elevated temperature in a paper bag the loaf will start to dry out to a noticeable extent. Note that the answer below does not address possible food safety ...


1

Flavored oils are a low-acid anaerobic (no air) environment. Herbs add a moisture source and can allow botulism bacteria to grow. Even if herbs are removed from the oil after infusing for a brief period, they may have already contaminated the remaining oil with botulism toxin and/or allow small pieces of herbs to remain where the bacteria can grow. ...


2

Basic answer: it's generally recommended to sterilize jars before storing low-acid foods at room temperature. (Many canning procedures effectively sterilize the jars during processing.) In your case, you should be certain the jars are clean and thoroughly dry as well. Regarding your overall proposal: I'd only give away food gifts like this if I had ...


6

According to research conducted at the University of Idaho and published in 2014 in the journal Food Protection Trends, there are now consumer guidelines to process garlic (and certain herbs) safely through acidification before adding to oil. I would read the first link thoroughly to understand the necessary process. To ensure safety, follow the steps ...


4

What you're describing sounds normal to me. It's the result of overcooking them. The eggs themselves were fine. At a guess, you unknowingly messed up the timing for the particular batch described here (alternatively, the eggs may have been smaller than usual). Over cooking hard boiled eggs will result in the smell you identified (and also cause the ...


0

I recommend pasteurizing the sauce first. Read about it online. You need to get the temperature right for a moment and then put the sauce in glass jars to cool. (Like good old jam containers) Pasteurized sauces would have a shelf life of about three months if refrigerated. Also it depends on how sterile the jars are. Also you need to treat the jars with ...


2

I would assume that it's for safety reasons. Not yours only, but the manufacturers' as well. At the plant the manufacturer can control the environment and make sure that the product leaves in a condition that should last for a certain time under specific conditions ( e.g. when refrigerated). Subtract a bit for safety and you have the manufacturers ...


4

It is safe to eat? Almost certainly, especially if you bake it. Your dough doesn't contain anything that will "go bad" in 15 hours at room temperature. Many bread dough recipes containing only flour, water, salt, and yeast are left to proof at room temperature for 12-24 hours, though they generally start with a much smaller amount of yeast. Could it "go ...


2

Poke the dough with a floured finger. If the indentation stays behind with no spring back, it's over proofed. With that much yeast, probably about 4 or 5 hours. Contrary to popular belief, a long, slow, cold prove is actually better in terms of flavour and texture than a fast one. You control the speed of the prove with the amount of yeast and the ...


1

Some people don't want to put the part of the glass your mouth touches on the possibly dirty cupboard bottom. Let's assume that the insides of your cupboards are clean enough (you have no mice, rodents etc) that this is not an issue. Further, let's assume that you have cupboard doors and the aforementioned lack of vermin, so worrying about dust and pests ...


0

I use frozen trimmings and bones for stock on a regular basis and haven't ever had any issues (and I can't see why you would). However, parts from food eaten by someone may have contamination issues unless they only removed the bones and/or skin with clean hands (which you could have done yourself before serving them). I don't follow many rules for my ...


4

Where did this urban myth start? Storing a cup upside down has few real advantages. The usual story is that it prevents cockroaches from crawling all over the cups. If this is the problem, then why don't people store their plates and bowls upside down, which roaches etc would definitely crawl over. I might be wrong, but, my experience is that roaches that ...


-1

I have had a bottle of Rose's Grenadine syrup in my cabinet opened for probably 3 and a half or better years now just used it last night to make sunsets and sunrises, tasted great and I nor any of my guest got sick, well except the one's that drank a few to many. I can't claim for any others but I'm gonna finish the bottle tonight with my girl. Have a great ...


0

I don't know about the safety standpoint, but from a texture standpoint -- don't refrigerate them. The problem is that they turn into an brick when cold -- rather than being a nice dessert, it's something that you have to gnaw at and fear that you're going to chip a tooth. You might be able to get around this by warming them back up before serving, but ...


2

I can't advise on any of these, so I'd normally put this in a comment, but it's a bit long. Searching on 'how to cook avocado seeds' found a few articles on the topic: http://www.livestrong.com/article/31737-eat-avocado-seeds-nutrition/ : calls for grinding it in a 'powerful food processor' and warns that it might damage lesser ones. ...


3

This article indicates that the elevated temperature would retard staling, It has been shown that changes in the starch contributes about 93, 50 and 20 percent of the total crumb firmness at 20°C, 30°C and 36°C, respectively, during five days of storage. The results imply that changes in the starch in the crumb are about one-half and one-fourth ...


6

In most countries string beans and green beans are exactly the same thing (see wikipedia's entry for green bean). They are both words used to refer to various unripe cultivars of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris. The phrase string bean is older and dates back to when beans had a fibrous string down the pod that you could peal off. The first stringless bean ...


-2

The moisture in the fridge allows rust to start forming


6

This is generally referred to as "lacto-fermented" mayonnaise. The whey is assumed to have active bacteria, and most recipes insist on a room temperature rest for at least several hours. During this time, I suppose the assumption is that the bacteria from the whey will ferment and produce sufficient acidity to act as a preservative (as in sauerkraut or ...


3

I haven't seen proof but this isn't plausible to me. The way to make mayo last longer is to make it more acidic- per this question. Notice that many recipes call for mayo to rest at room temp for an hour or two to let the high acid kill salmonella before it is refrigerated. Vinegar or lemon juice are usually used in Mayo and they have pH levels of around ...


1

This is wrong. There is no food safety rule saying that mixing yogurt into mayonnaise will make it magically shelf stable. Even though there might be some factual reduction in bacterial growth, it is not enough to assume any change to the usual holding time. I can imagine two sources for the confusion. First, if you add acid to mayonnaise, you can prevent ...


-1

2 days is usually the max for chicken in the fridge that is officially recommend, 5 days is definitely on the long side. Pending the sell by date that the chicken had originally. Color is just the marinade, it's the bacteria you need to be concerned about. Hard to tell if chicken has gone bad in a marinade. Good acidic or high salt marinade, you are ...


2

You know I attended the BBQ Camp at Texas A&M, which was sponsored by Foodways Texas and conducted by the faculty of the Meat Science Department, and the first module of the workshop was food safety. One of the faculty discussed an experience he had when he was invited to a friends house for dinner. His host made steaks on the grill and carried the ...


1

Most things probably just fine. Some have a fairly strong odor that could be transferred to some foods. Would probably throw out bread. Would also throw out moths. Even a few hours exposure might damage them to the point where they won't have that fresh moth flavor.


6

Mothballs work by sublimating (evaporating) a toxic substance into the air. That substance, be it para-dichlorobenzene or napthalene, recondenses on whatever else is in the area around them, and makes those objects toxic to moths etc. However, the sublimation takes a long time. You can leave mothballs in a closet for months, and still not see very little ...


0

Bleach (1-10% depending how bad the fridge is) water, rag or sponge, wipe clean, wipe off/dry, rinse with plain water, wipe clean/dry. Ideally park all the food in a cooler so you can air the fridge out throughly after cleaning.


3

The StillTasty link you give for the sausages is for all types of fresh, raw sausages, not just pork. That's why it's labeled "SAUSAGES (INCLUDING PORK, BEEF, CHICKEN OR TURKEY) — FRESH, RAW". Most likely, they're getting the 1–2-day limit from the chicken sausages (which are likely to have a higher initial bacteria load than pork or beef). Note that they ...


0

I try to clean shelves regularly so the sludge doesn't get too thick, but if it did get thick, I would probably break out the steam cleaner. It's great for cutting through thick dried-on sludge. I would be careful of any glass, however, because the temperature shock might break it (most glass shelves are removable, though).



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