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Sorry, but can someone explain how botulinum can grow in meat when it's an anaerobic bacteria and only grows when no oxygen is present? Not being a smartass... I really would like to know. Thanks


2

Given the vinegar, these sound like pickled peppers. Pickled items are usually made to last, even when not refrigerated -- preservation was the original purpose of pickling. As it says on the Wikipedia article about pickling: "Another distinguishing characteristic is a pH 4.6 or lower,[2] which is sufficient to kill most bacteria. Pickling can preserve ...


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According to the picture on this site and the description, it seems as if certain potatoes have a natural streaked coloring inside: http://antiquityoaks.blogspot.com/2010_05_01_archive.html (scroll down a lot or press Ctrl+F or Cmd+F and search for "potato" and it should move the focus to the relevant part of the page. Here's the picture alone: http://1.bp....


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@JasonTrue's reply is the answer. Below emphasis is mine: However, if you reach 145F within the first hour at the highest setting, then keep it at "warm", and test the temperature after about 30 minutes with an instant-read thermometer and it stays around 140-160F, you'll probably be fine. That first hour is key. You want to get food temp raised out ...


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I have the Crock-Pot brand 7 quart manual crock pot. Looking on their website (crock-pot.com) I was able to find the following... Both the low and high settings will reach a maximum temperature of approximately 215 degrees Fahrenheit, but they cycle differently in that the low setting cycles off of that temperature more frequently. Therefore, the high ...


0

The instructions should read to throw away half the starter if you haven't used it to make bread (i.e. the starter needs to be refreshed in order to continue living). If it doesn't get new flour and water, it has nothing to keep it alive. So it tells you to get rid of half (by baking or, at worst, chucking it out). You could keep it, but you would end up ...


1

Typically if you suspect that a jar is actually contaminated with botulism the procedure is to leave it sealed and throw it away. This is due to the ability of botulism to become airborne. (see: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/identify_handle_spoiled_canned_food.html ) The washing of old gross jars is usually aimed at high-acid foods that may have popped ...


4

You're asking about a few different attributes here: safe/unsafe - food is safe when it's essentially guaranteed not to cause foodborne illness. Nothing is perfect, of course, but if a food safety agency says something's safe, it means there's a sufficiently small chance of illness that they're fine with telling everyone that it's okay to eat. So if ...


5

In principle, I don't see why you couldn't take the flour to safe temperatures just like any other food. You'd have to reach temperatures which break down proteins, something like 165 F or 75 C should be sufficient (it's good enough for meat). This will break down the proteins in the flour too, so I would expect it to behave like standard browned flour (...


1

I just dehydrated things for the first time yesterday, mainly russets. I saw something in the instructions about preparing potatoes but neglected to follow through. They were reeeeaaally black. I mean, they brought to mind black mold. But I knew it couldn't be that. They taste fine, but aren't attractive. I'm going to use them as snacks over the coming week. ...


3

By the time escargot1 are heated to serve (I presume you had the standard garlic / herb butter gratin version served in the shell?), they have already been cooked for two to three hours in total. Escargot are killed by dumping them in their shells in boiling water, not unlike some cooks prepare lobster.2 The soft body is removed from the shell, inedible ...


-1

Use a plastic bag... It's good for thawing and slow freezing. Just keep your bottles in the bag.


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I hate wasting, so I get why you are asking this, lol! I agree with "osp"... SMELL it. Sour or fishy or not like banana, well, then your banana bread might taste like something sour or fishy or not like banana. Easiest solution is to just scoop off the top layer of the mashed banana that was exposed to the air!


2

Does eating raw flour or doughs containing raw flour pose a significant food safety risk (i.e., greater than other dry goods or ingredients in your kitchen)? Yes, as the level of bacteria has not been reduced/killed especially if the dough has been sitting/fermenting and/or contains harmful bacteria. Nb: Most flour isn't washed or treated (irradiated) ...


0

Yes it is okay, you have a greater risk of cross contamination, but if you're careful you can negate those risks. As to how long foods can stay, it depends on the food item and the temperature of the food being placed into the fridge, also the temperature of the fridge. Most people give a rough 2-3 days, with the onus of checking the food appears safe when ...


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Yes, if I comprehend correctly, it was part of the brine solution you heated, but it was not actually used in pickling. There is (arguably) some concern with reuse pickled liquids, on the basis of potential levels of bacteria. Personally, I have reused pickling solutions - though these have mainly been vinegar solutions based and not brine solutions. Have ...


3

Ideally you should get airtight containers, but failing that, plastic wrap is indeed a lot better than just covering with a plate. As you say, you'll tend to get more smells mixing around in the fridge if things aren't airtight, and it's something that can kind of build up over time, with the interior of the fridge just taking on a mix of all the smells. (...


2

I usually go to CDC for stuff like this: Multistate Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O121 Infections Linked to Flour Case Count: 42 States: 21 Deaths: 0 Hospitalizations: 11 Recall: Yes Recall & Advice to Consumers & Retailers The recall page gives use by dates and UPC of the affected batches.


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Simply No. You could explore (hot or cold) smoking, even curing (eg gravadlax). The cooking challenge sounds more of a food safety challenge!


0

Use sterilised glass jar/s similar to jam making and pickling, you can place some plastic wrap (cling film) over the top of the jar before sealing as an additional air/moisture barrier. Also think of possibly dividing into smaller portions.


1

I am not aware of any official guideline on storing drinking water, probably because people just don't do it usually. But for other purposes of water storage (humidifiers etc.) the rule of thumb is that water which will sit around for more than a week has to be treated. If anything, the rules for drinking water should be shorter (because you can have ...


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Actually it dependence from various others factors. For example water the chlorination of water. How much chorion are in. Then from the area that is bottled. What kind of microorganism are in the air and or the bottle. From the time of the year. Winter or summer. Summer is hotter so more and faster growing microorganism. From the type of the bottle. If it ...


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There are equal concerns with fresh and now apparently even frozen vegies in the US. I have not seen food packaged this way although each food has an equal concern. I will address only the vegetables, but note that given current concerns, just tossing out the pretty greens that have touched the meat would not address the issue, if the meat is not going to ...



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