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3

I think there are two important factors contributing to the different layers from a single batter. The first one is the oven temperature. This magic cake is baked at a lower 300-320F than normal 350-375F oven temperature. This lower temperature allows the starch in the batter to settle before coagulation takes place. This contributes to the bottom dense ...


4

At least in theory what you're proposing should work, however I wouldn't mix sodium hydroxide, calcium chloride, water and corn all in one pot as you seem to be suggesting. I'm not chemistry expert, but as I understand it sodium hydroxide and calcium chloride react easily when dissolved in water to form calcium hydroxide and sodium chloride. Having corn in ...


0

I don't know how old this food science is but I reckon the white vinegar (which is distilled vinegar, btw.) was used for pickling onions. Many chips shop use up their old stock as best as they can so once the onions have finished instead of throwing the vinegar away they used it to go on your chips. I must admit it is very tasty on fish too.


1

Physician opinion: Foods that use fermentation, chemicals (vinegar, salt, sugar), bacteria, fungi, yeast, etc., in their production are not "spoiled", they are "processed", and include many regional specialties found less palatable by many in the U.S., except alcohols. Spoilage refers more to when foods become inedible due to either excessive growth of ...


1

There's a lot of good answers here, so let me focus on the part that's mostly omitted. A huge chunk of the food we eat is spoiled. Intentionally. The reasoning for each is very wide, from preventing harmful spoilage (food preservation), to improving taste, texture etc. The most obvious of those foods are of course cheeses and yoghurts. Even the simplest ...


0

As an addition to rumtscho's answer: You can mitigate the risk of bacterial infection by cooking it (except for the exceptional bacteria that can survive cooking, but those are rather rare and rarely dangerous). You cannot mitigate the toxins by cooking (in general, they might break down due to the heat, but most don't). Other factors to take into account ...


0

Food rarely spoils on its own. The spoilage is usually a result of many different bacteria and fungi living on the foodstuff, consuming it, and depositing waste or metabolic by products. These by products may be toxic to you. The organisms themselves may be poisonous, or may simply invoke a strong immune reaction (which can also be uncomfortable). However, ...


10

I like rumtscho's answer, but feel the need to add to it. Amount ingested is a main factor in if you get sick, so to answer your main question - a TINY bit of bad Ranch Dressing is unlikely to make you sick. A lot of foods are intentionally spoiled - yogurt, buttermilk, cottage cheese, cheese (especially Blue Cheese and the other moldy ones), meat is aged ...


3

There are also things which can happen to your food which won't cause any immediate symptoms, but which are quite bad for you in the long run. For instance, some molds produce mycotoxins (the most famous being aflatoxins) which can increase the risk of cancer. Apart from this, I believe rumtscho covered the reasons you shouldn't eat spoiled food pretty well ...


54

What most people don't get when it comes to food safety: Spoiled food has a chance of making you sick. When food is visibly spoiled, it has large bacterial colonies growing in it. This means that it has been exposed to conditions which were promoting bacterial growth. Anything which was present on your food will have grown, unless outcompeted by something ...


3

It depends what's in there; in most cases it's the toxins that make you sick, rather than the organisms themselves, but that's a generalization. Moldy cheese is bad - unless, of course, it's supposed to be moldy, in which case it's good (well, not to me, but to folks that like blue cheese it is...) Bacteria are bad - unless, of course, they happen to be ...


0

Pickling lime (calcium hydroxide) makes a great alternative to sodium bicarb when tomato sauces, or whatever, are too acid. Unlike bicarb, it doesn't add any flavor that I can tell, and serves as a good source of dietary calcium.


0

Chocolate does go bad, when it does it's called blooming, the cocoa butter starts to run out of the chocolate and leaves what looks like white flowers or webbing on the surface of the chocolate. Chocolate lasts longest when kept in the cold.


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You'd have to define what "go bad" means exactly. If it gets toxic or whether the taste, looks or something else changes. I found an answer from someone from lindt&spr√ľngli: "Although cooling could probably prevent the chocolate to expire fast, room temperature is actually the best for the chocolate's quality. I still don't get why so many people like ...



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