New answers tagged

1

There is no expiration date. At most, it would be a 'best buy' or 'sell by date'. See http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/food-labeling/food-product-dating/food-product-dating


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One consideration that hasn't been mentioned in your selection of a pan. If you use something like cast iron, you require some time to heat it up, but it will continue to cook the meat even after you've turned off the burner. A thinner pan will require leaving the burner on the whole cooking time. Personally, I'd look into slicing the meat thinly so that ...


1

Answering more as a chemical engineer - we study heat transfer. A lid clearly reduces heat loss. A lid also turns the pan into an oven - you hold the heat and use it on the non burner side. A little bit of water will put more molecules in the vapor phase for more heat transfer but dilutes flavor. More than little bit is waste. Steam is 1000 x the ...


1

As @Jefromi says, there is no simple answer. Also depends on your definition of "cooked". For water vs oil, most likely oil is more energy efficient. Frying a 16 oz steak takes only ~5/10 minutes, whereas boiling 16 oz of meat in water will take at least double that time, even if you use exact same pan and exact same stove. If you cut the meat more ...


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I doubt there's a simple perfect answer. You'd want to cook it hot, but not too hot, and with a little bit of water water, but not too much. If you cook too hot you're wasting energy, since it takes time for the heat to propagate to the center of the meat. If you don't cook hot enough to at least keep everything at 100C, you'll be wasting more energy over ...


6

Basically everything at all normal is safe. There is a mushroom that gets toxic if combined with alcohol, but alcohol itself isn't 100% safe and if you're gathering wild mushrooms you need to be safety conscious, so it's not really something you could run into by accident or with storebought ingredients. Relevant paragraph from Wikipedia Consuming ...


1

Vinegar is acidic thanks to its concentration of acetic acid. It thus has a low pH, somewhere between 2.5 and 5 depending on the type of vinegar. Acidic substances can affect the delicate amino acids which form the proteins that make up the majority of your meat (along with other fats and connective tissues). The end result is not entirely unlike what ...


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Yes... very safe to eat. All meats and many of the wonderful condiments we cook with contain acids that help not only with the flavoring but also helps in breaking down the meats to tenderize them. Occasionally, you will get a "burn through"or small acid bubbles forming on the aluminum foil due to its thinness. The heat from the oven also acts as a catalyst. ...


1

"Denaturing" is when something makes a protein unwind from it's normally stable, coiled state. The unzipped proteins are then able to tangle up with each other. In milk this action makes them precipitate out as the curd. http://www.thekitchn.com/the-science-behind-why-acid-curdles-milk-222962 There are a few things that make milk proteins denature: Heat, ...


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Protein doesn't get denatured by adding citric acid during cheese making, however it makes them "clump" together, hence forming what is known generaly as lactic curd (or in this case it would be "citric" curd I guess). For example in a Crottin style cheese (lactic goat cheese), that's what makes the texture all crumbly by letting the bacteria produce a good ...


0

Actually, it's a matter of physics. More heat = more energy = all actions and reactions happen more quickly. Freezing slows down but does not stop chemical processes. Those would not stop unless your freezer could chill things to absolute zero. If your food is in the refrigerator, processes take place in a matter of days, because the food is relatively ...


3

Most freezers are frost-free, which means that they occasionally cycle above freezing to prevent formation of frost on the walls of the freezer. This makes them easier to maintain but it shortens the storage longevity of the food. This makes products stored in them vulnerable to freezer burn, which is a loss of moisture. It can also cause ice and IQF ...


2

It's really easier to do with icing, but if you make a really pale dough such as a sugar cookie dough, you can color it. I once made pie-chart shaped cookies by doing this, then making wedges in various colors & sizes, then squishing them all back together into a log, and slicing it into rounds. I don't know if it was the colors that I was using, but I ...


1

I was wondering if this should be closed as too broad or unclear, or answered. I'll attempt an answer. The information you are looking for doesn't exist. First, there are no common factors which make all and any food tasty. Second, the factors which make most foods tasty have nothing to do with absorption, and in fact most foods do not absorb anything at ...



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