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Salt your food well. See for example this article (paywall, but the abstract is sufficient). You are unlikely to have calcium chloride in your kitchen, so you probably can't use the divalent cations route. But "monovalent cations, such as Na+, almost halved the acrylamide formed in the model system". Now, a model system is not a pan, but they at least ...


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First off here is my source www.cancer.org Acrylamide does not appear to be in raw foods themselves. It is formed when certain starchy foods are cooked at temperatures above about 250° F. Cooking methods such as frying, baking, broiling, or roasting are more likely to produce acrylamide, while boiling, steaming, and microwaving appear less likely to do so. ...


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Soaking loosens embedded dirt and meldew. I soak beans for 6 hours then thoroughly rinse. I'm picky when in comes to food and I don't want any black stuff on my white beans.


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I think there are two important factors contributing to the different layers from a single batter. The first one is the oven temperature. This magic cake is baked at a lower 300-320F than normal 350-375F oven temperature. This lower temperature allows the starch in the batter to settle before coagulation takes place. This contributes to the bottom dense ...


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At least in theory what you're proposing should work, however I wouldn't mix sodium hydroxide, calcium chloride, water and corn all in one pot as you seem to be suggesting. I'm not chemistry expert, but as I understand it sodium hydroxide and calcium chloride react easily when dissolved in water to form calcium hydroxide and sodium chloride. Having corn in ...


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I don't know how old this food science is but I reckon the white vinegar (which is distilled vinegar, btw.) was used for pickling onions. Many chips shop use up their old stock as best as they can so once the onions have finished instead of throwing the vinegar away they used it to go on your chips. I must admit it is very tasty on fish too.


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Physician opinion: Foods that use fermentation, chemicals (vinegar, salt, sugar), bacteria, fungi, yeast, etc., in their production are not "spoiled", they are "processed", and include many regional specialties found less palatable by many in the U.S., except alcohols. Spoilage refers more to when foods become inedible due to either excessive growth of ...


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There's a lot of good answers here, so let me focus on the part that's mostly omitted. A huge chunk of the food we eat is spoiled. Intentionally. The reasoning for each is very wide, from preventing harmful spoilage (food preservation), to improving taste, texture etc. The most obvious of those foods are of course cheeses and yoghurts. Even the simplest ...


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As an addition to rumtscho's answer: You can mitigate the risk of bacterial infection by cooking it (except for the exceptional bacteria that can survive cooking, but those are rather rare and rarely dangerous). You cannot mitigate the toxins by cooking (in general, they might break down due to the heat, but most don't). Other factors to take into account ...



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