Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

I'm going to try to take a crack at this answer, from my perspective as a materials scientist, which is kind of a combination of solid state physics and solid state chemistry. How popcorn pops is from superheating the water in the kernels until there's enough pressure to break through the outer hull. Then, the starch inside the kernel is able to rapidly ...


5

I think most of your confusion comes from the paradigm of water. Water (under kitchen conditions) will not get any hotter than its boiling point. Oil has no such limitation. You microwave will heat oil well past water's boiling point and all the way up past the smoke point to the flash point of the oil. At the flash point, the oil will actually catch ...


3

This previous question (and the accepted answer) are related to the food science raised in the final part of the question. Some of these chemical processes are much easier and/or quicker to accomplish when the egg is beaten by itself than after it may be mixed in and diluted with other ingredients. These changes in the egg protein structure can affect the ...


0

They're all good for about a week past the date on the carton, according to this link for milk substitutes and this link for milk. Of course, shelf life for milk depends almost completely on the method of pasteurization. It's worth noting that "spoiled" milk is almost always related to natural milk bacteria, rather than a food borne pathogen: they out ...


-1

Not sure about why, but in my experience cow's milk spoils much faster than soy milk.


0

Because the molecules inside the marshmallow moves faster and faster as the heat rises and the little bubbles of air inside the marshmallows grow bigger and bigger and then it expands. only 14 years of age


0

Just add ginger paste along with garlic. NO color change of blue or green. I successfully tried this. The ginger will not allow the garlic to change color.


0

Simple answer: "There is nothing hotter than boiling" as it was neatly explained to me once. The boiling point of any liquid is simply the point at which it turns into vapor. It's not going to get any hotter under normal kitchen conditions. Higher heat will just make it evaporate faster. Jon Hanna's answer to this question is a good explanation of the ...


10

No, you should not need to boil your canned food. Most canned foods have already been heated to boiling — or higher — temperatures to kill all microbes as part of the canning process. Seafood is heated to temperatures even higher than boiling and canned under pressure. Canned food is, by definition, sterilized and hermetically sealed so unless you believe ...


7

Commercially canned food (at least in reasonably wealthy countries, which I think would include at least all of the EU) is safe to eat straight out of the can. Provided the can is undamaged, of course. Damaged, bulging, etc. cans should be discarded. You didn't say what country in specific you're in, but your country's health, food safety, etc. department ...


0

As a child my mother would soak liver in a bowl of milk for a day and a half regularly replacing the milk and washing the liver before cooking it. What I noticed is that the blood from the liver would seep out into the milk and the liver would have absorbed some of the milk. I can't remember what she said about the milk treatment but it had something to do ...



Top 50 recent answers are included