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1

What happens if you brine something for a long time depends on the concentration of your brine, much like temperature affects what happens when you cook something for long. Thus, you can apply equilibrium brining and brine your meat for a longer time in a less concentrated solution. I haven't tried it, but according to linked source you'll get desired ...


1

I don't have a scientific backing to what I am going to say, but still I will try to make my point clear! Cooking eggs is more of an intuitive thing. The fast vs. slow thing comes more from your own rendezvous with it. Like in my house, when we say omelet, only my husband is allowed to put hands on it because he gets that perfect round thing without ...


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The matter of time efficiency could be seen as that which determines the answer: The first thing that caught my attention about your description of the two camps is the language that you use (or quote?) for their outcomes. Both camps "keep the eggs tender". And then, of the eggs, the one camp manages to "puff them up" while the other suffices to "increase ...


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I agree with Sourd'oh, your best option is to use a blender. A mixer will do too. A high RPM number is good, but not essential. What works well is to blow the powder gently onto the surface of the juice. I do this with a handheld mixer: I hold a teaspoon with the colloid builder (guar gum or other clumpy substance) above the surface, and either tip the ...


3

Basically your issue will be clumping. Guar gum powder and most other fine powders are so fine (micro fine ) they insist on clumping together. The way round this is either, as previously mentioned, blend it which will likely cause a massive amount of air bubbles OR the preferred method (for chef's ) is by using equal amounts of maltodextrin, which is ...


3

The lumps of gum in products are known as "fish-eyes". Unless you get pre-hydrated gum, the best way to avoid them is to mix it in a blender (and a pretty powerful one at that). Sometimes pre-hydrated gum will mix in more smoothly and with fewer lumps, but you'd still need to blend it. Another option that may not be practical in your case is to disperse the ...


0

Do you have soy yogurt in the same fridge? Soymilk based yogurt with live cultures, if somehow able to cross contaminate your milk, could cause fermentation to occur. I've never used soy milk, but I know the same process for making regular yogurt is the same as the process for making soy yogurt, just with a different set of cultures. Short answer - it sounds ...


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Spoken to generally here, (the wiki on Tofu), and stated more specifically here Tofu is manufactured by coagulating proteins in soymilk with magnesium sulfate. As bonding occurs between the positively charged magnesium ions and negatively charged anionic groups of the protein molecules, the proteins coagulate. Since magnesium sulfate, also known ...


4

Soy milk can spoil, just like ordinary cow's milk. That seems to be what happened. While spoilage in cow's milk is usually souring, and the smell is unmistakable at fifty paces, soy milk spoils by turning gooey. I'm not sure about the details, but it's something in how the proteins react to oxygen. In soy milk, if I'm not mistaken, they turn into longer, ...


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I have always brined my turkeys for anywhere from 5 to 7 days.


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One new product has came in market , but its useful to alert you when milk, soup , tea is about to boil http://www.abaxoenterprises.com. Product is milkalert, hope it will be useful to many of us


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Instant pudding contains a significant amount of cornstarch. It also contains less significant amounts of disodium phosphate and tetrasodium phosphate. All three of these ingredients will have an effect on cake. Starch absorbs water and gels during baking. This interferes with gluten formation to some degree. If you break down the starch in flour, which ...


1

Compared to just the cake batter (molecularly), the pudding (molecularly) traps water in a way that requires greater heat to release ...meaning greater than the amount of heat required to bake the cake. All of these trapped water molecules add up to equal a generally moister cake, but also a cake that requires refrigeration sooner and/or longer, or requires ...



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