Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The boiling water is actually an integral part of the recipe - the heat insures that the cocoa powder fully dissolves and contributes to a richer, more chocolate-y cake - and adding the baking soda to the water first will probably have more to do with enriching the color of the final baked cake than it has to do with leavening. It is NOT tied to sanitation ...


3

How it's supposed to be done The lump problem is straightforward: your mixing technique is failing. When you are using a well, you have to sift the flour first. Then you add a little bit of the homogenous liquid. So, you don't pour oil, eggs, etc. into the well, but first get them all into another bowl (including the water), and mix them well, preferably ...


4

Melt hard cheese with a little sodium citrate to make "processed cheese", which is pourable and moldable while hot You can make sodium citrate by heating the juice of a small lemon (2 to 3 tsp) in the microwave, and then adding one tsp of baking soda, and heating until it stops reacting (bubbling). Then add 1 cup (~100 g) of grated/shaved/powdered cheese ...


1

Yes, you can mix gluten and other starch sources to replace bread. The amount of gluten added depends on what type of flour you are trying to approximate. All numbers below give the final ratio of gluten. So, "cake flour: 5-6% gluten" means you should mix 5-6 g gluten with 95-54 g of your other flour to get an approximation of cake flour. The gluten ...


1

As was said before, it's not easily possible to extract the nitrate from produce. However, there are vegetables that contain more nitrate that others. You can look these up and use them for your baby's food. Be sure not to cook too one-sided, though; so your kid doesn't go without important nutrients that happen to come with nitrate-rich veggies. If you ...


4

Your question has two main parts, what's elastic about gluten, and why don't other plants have this unicorn we call a gluten protein. I'll provide some background info first, but feel free to skip ahead to the spoilers if you like. Quick and dirty background on proteins... All proteins (like gluten) are made of differing sequences, and number of about 20 ...


5

What is food grade lye Pure lye is by itself always food grade. There is nothing toxic about lye (although it's corrosive even at low-ish concentrations). When a manufacturer sells you food grade lye, they are guaranteeing you that it is not contaminated with anything unpleasant. After all, a chemistry plant will make a lot of different chemicals using ...



Top 50 recent answers are included