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This is the microstructure of SAE 304, a steel type commonly used in pans: At this magnification, its "pores" look like cracks. Now see it at other magnifications (still a SAE 304, other types of steel look completely different, especially if you look at martenistic steels): It gets even more complicated than that, because steel structure differs ...


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Taste the uncooked pretzels. That's the key. The baking soda won't affect how they bake; if the uncooked pretzels taste OK, they'll be fine. That's my opinion, there is disagreement, see the comments. If you do end up baking them, we'd love to hear the results. As Didgeridrew mentions in comments, skip the soda in the boiling step. If the pretzels taste bad ...


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tldr The point of oiling a stainless steel pan is to lubricate the (already mostly smooth) surface, and the point of seasoning cast iron is to fill the irregularities with a layer of non-stick polymer that results from burning off the oil. Are the pores real? This depends on the material the pan is made of. Cast iron is not porous in the way sponges and ...


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What happens if you brine something for a long time depends on the concentration of your brine, much like temperature affects what happens when you cook something for long. Thus, you can apply equilibrium brining and brine your meat for a longer time in a less concentrated solution. I haven't tried it, but according to linked source you'll get desired ...


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I don't have a scientific backing to what I am going to say, but still I will try to make my point clear! Cooking eggs is more of an intuitive thing. The fast vs. slow thing comes more from your own rendezvous with it. Like in my house, when we say omelet, only my husband is allowed to put hands on it because he gets that perfect round thing without ...


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The matter of time efficiency could be seen as that which determines the answer: The first thing that caught my attention about your description of the two camps is the language that you use (or quote?) for their outcomes. Both camps "keep the eggs tender". And then, of the eggs, the one camp manages to "puff them up" while the other suffices to "increase ...


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I agree with Sourd'oh, your best option is to use a blender. A mixer will do too. A high RPM number is good, but not essential. What works well is to blow the powder gently onto the surface of the juice. I do this with a handheld mixer: I hold a teaspoon with the colloid builder (guar gum or other clumpy substance) above the surface, and either tip the ...


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Basically your issue will be clumping. Guar gum powder and most other fine powders are so fine (micro fine ) they insist on clumping together. The way round this is either, as previously mentioned, blend it which will likely cause a massive amount of air bubbles OR the preferred method (for chef's ) is by using equal amounts of maltodextrin, which is ...


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The lumps of gum in products are known as "fish-eyes". Unless you get pre-hydrated gum, the best way to avoid them is to mix it in a blender (and a pretty powerful one at that). Sometimes pre-hydrated gum will mix in more smoothly and with fewer lumps, but you'd still need to blend it. Another option that may not be practical in your case is to disperse the ...



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