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1

For a small fillet of frozen fish in a ziplock bag, this method will be fine because any single serving fish fillet will only take 10 minutes or even less to defrost in warm water, and will take even less time to cook. However, as described in other answers, you cannot extend this method to larger cuts of meat like a massive t-bone steak or a giant chicken ...


0

The official answer is it's unsafe, and if you forget you food it can be. However, I defrost like this all the time. The trick is to be quick about it. Chicken can be put right in the water directly, and you can massage the frozen parts apart as the heat melts the cracks. The difference between frozen and safe zone thawed is only a few degrees. Once the ...


3

This in general can be unsafe, because the temperature of the warm water will be in the danger zone. That means that you'll be holding the surface of the food in the danger zone for the duration of the defrosting. Since you don't want to hold food in the danger zone for more than a couple hours, and that's cumulative over the whole process from fridge to ...


4

The way fish (shelfish included) is dispatched impacts both its flavor and texture. The Japanese have a long history of this knowledge. This type of fish killing is called ike jime. Dave Arnold did some interesting research on this. You'll find it here: http://www.cookingissues.com/index.html%3Fp=5731.html Bottom line: How you kill a lobster does ...


2

Assuming you can get fresh lobster, you definitely should keep it as fresh as possible prior to cooking. Generally, that will mean keeping the bug alive until it's cooked. I haven't heard of this effect myself, and if it's true, I very much doubt that it's due to the lobster "suffering". If anything, it's probably just that a vigorous boil applies too much ...


0

IME, IMHO, IM Tales of Whatever...ayuh. I think this is made up. For a cooking method, it's better to steam than to boil. Small amount of water in a tightly covered pot - far less dilution of the juices/flavor. If you boil them you're making "lobster tea" all around them, and then eating the teabag. You don't see much in the way of places offering "boiled ...


0

Cabbage stored in a freezer tends to be watery and limp when thawed. We would never store cabbage in our freezers.


-2

Yes you can, you just have to take out all the air out by using a vacuum sealer to reduce freezer burn. In this way you can freeze them for a long time and you should freeze them in batches.


0

1 calorie is the energy needs to heat or cool 1 ccm of water 1 degree C in one second. Let's simplify this question by just saying meat is water...no it's not correct, but I don't know how to handle meat as far as how much meat can a calorie warm or cool by 1 degree, and I think it's close enough to at least get a practical even if not mathematically ...


2

For water it's 1 Kg = 1 litre. Meat is around 75% water. So for most foods you can roughly say 1 Kg = 1 litre. Give or take some, plus packaging materials and voids in packing So 1500 Kg meat is going to be up to 2000 to 3000 litres! Freezers compressors are rated by their ability to cool quickly only at much smaller capacity than the total capacity of the ...


3

I do this every week but with breakfast buns. I mix up my dough, do the kneading and first rise, then shape and freeze immediately. Then, every evening, I take the frozen shaped bun dough out of the freezer, put it in the baking pan, and let it rise overnight. The next morning (6:30am), I bake it. I've been doing this for several years. It works great, but ...


5

Yeast can definitely survive in the freezer, yet timing for the final rising will be altered by unfreezing. After several attempts, I found it best to freeze viennoiseries such as croissants, pains au chocolat (croissants leavened puff pastry), pains aux raisins (danish leavened puff pastry) and brioches suisses (small brioches filled with chocolate chips ...


4

My experience dictates that dough should be frozen once it is developed but not proofed (after kneading, stretching or stand-mixing) so that it is ready to rise and be shaped after thawing. The recipe that I first followed recommended that the dough be smooshed flat to ensure it freezes quickly. As to whether you can shape a loaf prior to freezing, I am not ...


1

The best way is to par bake the bread (until it's solid but not browned - about 50% of the cooking time) then freeze. If you let the par baked bread cool to room temperature and then freeze it unwrapped until it is hard. Once it's frozen wrap it in cling film (plastic wrap) and aluminium foil



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