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2

Your freezer causes this, as your experiment has shown. Freezers don't magically cool down their contents, like ovens have a heat source, freezers have a "cold source", so in your case the back cools / freezes first, encouraging condensation and subsequently the formation of ice crystals on the colder parts. If your freezer has an auto-defrost cycle, this ...


4

Red bell peppers freeze really well after being roasted. This is the method I would recommend for you. The problem with freezing first is that it can degrade the peppers (breaks the firm cell walls) and would likely make them more difficult to roast afterwards. If you roast them first, the cooking starts the cell collapse itself and the peppers don't tend ...


2

The only best option is complete thaw to get them in good shape and in one piece, but that is not an option for you. Next one up is the quick and sloppy method. But it will distroy the shape of the fish, hence the name. My tip: Wrap the pieces of fish in a cling film/kitchen foil individually next time before freezing. That will most certainly allow you to ...


2

If you make them the night before and freeze them, make sure that they are separated by a liner so they will not stick together. Freezing them will dry the wrapper and will assist in making the wrapper crispier a little longer than if you were to do item 2. I am not sure how long your commute will be, but do not let your lumpia thaw. It will take the ...


2

The way to store a small quantity of dry ice for a week without spending a lot of money on a freezer that will actually keep it below sublimation temperature, or having a cylinder of the pressurized liquid and a "dry ice maker attachment" for the cylinder to make some when you need some, is to buy a larger quantity of dry ice and store it in a well-insulated ...


1

Freezing from hot isn't a good idea for the neighbouring items in your freezer but shouldn't make much difference to the soup (it will start cooling down faster, but then more slowly as the freezer will be warmer than it should be). Freezing the soup before blending it should help, then reheat before blending. If you are making it specifically to freeze, ...


2

Don't freeze ice then. There's a couple of solutions where something with a good amount of heat capasity is popped into a freezer and used to cool things - the generic names for these seem to be drink chillers. They are made of materials like metal or granite which you throw into a fridge. It'll cool, and when added to a drink will absorb heat from it, and ...


6

Most of the cooling from ice comes from the melting anyway. That's why ice makers, which don't freeze as cold as freezers, are still useful. It takes 334J/g to turn ice at 0C into water at 0C, but only 2.03J/g to warm ice by 1C. So to halve the amount of ice you use to get the same cooling you'd need to freeze it to around -150C. If you're going to do that ...


3

I've done this a few times now. It works, straight from the freezer, no defrosting required. Here are some observations, based on cooking the kernels in a stove-top metal saucepan with a little medium-hot oil over a moderate heat: More steam than usual comes off the frozen popcorn during cooking. Without a pretty big gap between pan and lid (bigger than ...


1

Baked, covered, at low heat : ovens self-regulate, so you're going to get a more consistent result each time than doing it on the stovetop. covering will minimize evaporation, which will cool the top more. low heat will minimize problems with the edges cooking before the middle ... but eggs also have this strange thing where it's more difficult to over ...


2

The larger issue is the storage time that the sandwich has already been subjected to. 5 hours at room temperature is enough time for at least some of the tuna to spend significant time in the "danger zone" (the temperature range from 40 to 140 degrees F where bacteria grow most quickly). At this point I would not consider the sandwich safe, regardless ...


1

When you freeze anything that contains moisture, freezing produces ice crystals that rupture cell walls; this damage speeds up any spoilage that might begin. The more often you freeze a food, the more damage is done. I would advise against re-freezing anything you plan to eat without cooking, simply out of concern over not knowing how quickly any spoilage ...



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