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i think it is that you are letting the bread touch the sides of the freezer. same thing happens if i let the bread touch the sides of the refrigerator. the whole loaf will be fresh except whatever side was touching the side of the refrigerator. so just store the bread in the middle, with other things on either side, and i bet it fixes the issues. i know this ...


-1

Put the ice cubes in your hand or towel (whichever you prefer) and bash it with the back of a big or medium spoon.


1

Welcome pam! According to this article about rice noodles on everything2.com , you should be able to store them frozen for up to 2 months. Excerpt below: If you really need to store them for a longer period, keep them in the fridge for up to a week, or in the freezer for up to 2 months.


7

I don't think there's a chemical process here. It just takes a really long time for it to freeze solid. After 5-6 hours it was probably firmer around the outside than in the middle, and after a day it was probably fully frozen. (I've made a lot of ice cream, and have reliably seen this.) It takes so long because the heat transfer is so inefficient. It's ...


4

I'd recommend freezing them unbaked. The crumb is a lot more delicate once they're baked and more susceptible to moisture migration, leading to them being soggy or stale (or both! at the same time!) when thawed. Scones, being relatively low moisture and not containing yeast, actually freeze quite well and can usually go straight from the freezer to the oven. ...


0

I think you're most definitely better off baking them and then freezing them. Breads and pastries freeze beautifully. I worked at a Starbucks and we received all of our pastries frozen because of our location being outside of the main distribution area. It didn't make a difference from the ones we received unfrozen at another store. Just don't defrost ...


0

Usually plastic wrapping doesn't burst from freezing, since its somewhat stretchable (unlike, say, glass). Even if it does burst, it's going to tear a seam or some weak spot—there shouldn't be an explosion. There is an easy safeguard to take though—just put a gallon freezer bag around it (squeeze out as much air as you can). Or sit it in a container to ...


2

I've frozen bottles of vermouth many times. There is no issue with just letting it thaw out in the normal way. In fact you can wait until it's partly thawed, give it a good shake, and hey presto, vermouth slushy, which goes in some cocktails rather well. Fortified wines do slowly oxidise on exposure to the atmosphere, but this is greatly slowed by the ...



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