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3

I can honestly say I've done this on many occasions. Especially for pizza dough, I defrost in the fridge for 24 hours in a cling filmed bowl which allows it to prove slowly through the day. Never once had an issue with it.


1

You can also speed-chill the stock by putting it in a pan in an ice-water bath, or set it on one or more of those blue-ice bricks. This will reduce the overall time in the danger zone. Reducing the broth further speeds the process by increasing the ratio of ice mass to broth.


2

It not huge, it's just the difference from freezer to room temperature you are worrying about E.g. -20°C to 20°C, is A 40°C shift. The shift was going to be 20°C to 100+°C anyway. There is no physical reasons why this would be anymore stressful From room temperature you are raising it 80°C, from frozen you are raising it 120°C. ...


1

Busy time of year for us chefs so not really got time to do any research. Personally I don't think quality will be noticeable between big or small. Best way for freezing is always to vacuum to avoid freezer burn. If you wrap it up tight with a good few layers of cling film you should get a near vacuum result (as close as you will get without it) The best ...


2

If the stock has safely been held (under refrigeration for less than 3 days, less than 2 hours cumulative in the "danger zone" [40F - 140F, 4.5C - 60C]), then it would be considered safe before freezing or refreezing. It is always safe to freeze food that was safe to begin with. Freezing, and especially refreezing, can sometime negatively affect quality, ...


0

Isn't simply possible that the meat inside the turkey has less fat resulting in a higher freezing temperature point than the meat outside? Whatever the reason is would seem reasonable to think that a hot blooded animal typically exposed to cold temperature would evolve in such a way.


2

First principals of thermodynamics, heat will flow from a high-temperature region into a low temperature region. Given that meat is essentially a solid, the only heat transfer will be via conduction, i.e., you must cool (or heat) from the outside in. You could inject liquid nitrogen, etc. as has been suggested, but another solution is to alter the freezing ...


2

Depending on what you mean by "the inside", no, it's not possible for something to freeze from the inside out. The physics of the situation come from the second law of thermodynamics heat cannot spontaneously move from a cold place to a hot place. So, when you put an object in the freezer, the surface starts to give up its heat to the surroundings, then ...


0

We talk about freezing but, really, the benefits come from the low temperature, not from the change from liquid to solid. When you put things in the freezer, it doesn't matter whether they become solid or not: it just matters that they get cold.


13

Water freezes at 32F, but turkey contains more than just water. Alton Brown answers this question in his original turkey episode of Good eats. The meat freezes at 26F, so they can call it "fresh" if it's kept at say, 30F (below the freezing temp for water). The USDA recognizes "frozen" for a turkey as having been brought down to 0F. Apparently the middle ...


-1

I say both; it's possible, but it defies all logic. Yes the above discussion about freezing and thawing is probably right, but since the question is about if it's possible... Cut it and pour liquid nitrogen in it. It'll freeze from the inside out, maybe all the way through, and the nitrogen will evaporate so there's no trace. Still, probably not what ...


5

I don't know anything about the laws regarding what can be labeled as "fresh", but to answer your actual question, no, meat (or anything else) won't freeze from the inside, out. The meat would freeze or thaw from the outside, in. I suppose one could put some sort of hot or cold probe that was above/below freezing into the center of the meat. Then it would ...


12

Welcome to Seasoned Advice. The real truth is that most "fresh" turkeys are not fresh at all. Especially in the case of branded birds that are shipped en masse. The turkeys are most often shipped to markets frozen and they are thawed when placed for sale. (I have been inside of back room freezers and have seen them stocked there.) I have actually seen them ...


28

That's not how it happens. Turkey can be labeled "fresh" as in -never frozen- even if the turkey is held at temperatures below freezing. By law, 26F (-3.33C) is the cutoff in the US. If the turkey spends weeks at 27F, it can still be labeled fresh even though it would be considered frozen to any of us mere mortals. So, if a turkey has spent 2 weeks at 27F, ...


1

I found this useful: http://www.wessexmill.co.uk/recipe/freezeyeast.html As soon as I get it home I crumble 12g [of the fresh yeast] into approx 30g (2 dessert spoons) of a ordinary bread flour and mix it up so that I have a dry crumbly mix, and put into a small plastic bag. I do this to approx 70% of the yeast so I have about 50 small bags i.e 1.5kg ...


1

Hello Nicole and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Per the information found here , 4.5 months should not be a problem. It should be noted that freezing chocolate is not generally recommended. However, if you must do so you should be very detailed in your effort and you need to be sure and plan for enough time to do so properly. As @ElendilTheTall notes, the ...


3

Freezing chocolate is not ideal, because when it defrosts it can 'bloom' - you may have seen this happen with chocolate that has been stored unwrapped in the fridge. It gets an unsightly white coating. If you absolutely must freeze it, wrap it very well, and bring the temperature down slowly. First let it cool out of the fridge, then in the fridge for ...


3

No, there's no risk. Cheese has too much salt and acidity to harbor botulism even at room temperature; there's practically no chance of it growing in the refrigerator even with low-acid food, and literally zero chance of it growing in the freezer on any food. I don't think data is publicly available on individual botulism cases in the U.S. or worldwide, but ...



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