New answers tagged

1

I'd recommend just cooking them sooner rather than later. If you had to do anything, I'd consider cracking & brushing off the surface ice without thawing them, then vacuum sealing them ... but still try to use them quickly. If the texture is a little off, or the flavor a little lacking, you can always use the rest in either soup or a casserole, where ...


1

Answering from personal experience: Mine are in the freezer now for 5+ months, and don't show any sign of degradation. Not in smell, not in texture, not in color, not in taste. I expect them to be like that for some time to come.


2

Yes, you can use it. As renesis wrote, the texture will change; so it will much better cooked than raw. Chop it up and use it in a pasta sauce or a soup, sauce or stew. I'd do a sofrito with it as a base for a lot of things.


9

It is certainly still safe to use. Freezing vegetables will cause the the texture to soften, so it wouldn't provide a very enjoyable crunch, depending on how you plan on using it. It would be well suited for use in something like a pasta sauce, stew or chili.


3

Yes, it's completely safe. The main reason you don't repeatedly freeze and thaw food are that it makes things less pleasant to eat by messing with the texture. (If you thaw by heating, and you heat all the way into the danger zone, I suppose there could be safety concerns too.) None of that really applies to water. It's just water. You can keep a pitcher ...


0

I submerge can or bottle in cold water to minimze rapid temp increase as this changes the drink, I froze it already so try to minimize my error, and I cringe and drink my beer, its a bit different tasting but does the trick


4

There are a few more problems with frozen ingredients that might not be obvious at first: The cut of the ingredients is usually already defined by how the factory did it, and might or might not be as desired, be it for textural, cooking behaviour, or presentation reasons. There is always more free water in what you pour out of a freezer bag versus what ...


12

I like chef Ramsay, he can be snobbish and course at times but he knows food and he's a straight shooter and tells it like it is. Sometimes he's just saying the food isn't hot or even warm in the middle, but some times he is referring to frozen vs fresh ingredients. Most food is better when it's fresh, because freezing destroys cell walls and breaks down ...


0

You certainly can freeze raw meat - but only if it has not already been frozen and thawed. That is dangerous because it will have developed more bacteria.


1

I tried this recently. Washed & dried them and put them in a plastic bag in freezer for 30 mins only. It worked well for me - they were much tastier and a better texture.


0

White electrician's tape. Double a bit of the end over to act as a removal handle, and please, for good freezer storage, vacuum seal. It's cheap if you buy it in rolls.


0

Package the soup portions into watertight containers, eg lock-n-locks, then cool these by submerging them in (optionally running and/or iced) water as you suggested... BTW, fridges can take some sh...enanigans from hot contents since they actively regulate their own temperature ... to a limit. You might want to experiment with defined amounts of hot water ...


2

Chalk Pen! Chalk pens like the ones that bars use to write on blackboards work perfectly for writing on Tupperware. You can read them legibly indefinitely, you don't need to mess around with sticking labels onto things and, when you're done, you can just wipe it off with a damp cloth.


0

I'll add on to the above suggestion of painter's tape with a bit more specificity. Chef Thomas Keller uses green FrogTape painter's tape for storage at the French Laundry, and I'd pretty much take anything he does as gospel. It is easily removable, doesn't slide off the container if it gets wet, and is relatively cheap. Anything you do as far as food ...


2

Adhesive (office) tape, paper, scissors and a pen. I've always used the most inexpensive solution: simply cut the cheapest paper you can find (I use printer paper) into long strips or rectangles (that you then cut down into strips). You can write as much or as little info on it as you want and vary the size of the paper accordingly. Simply stick a piece ...


0

Similar to Joe M's answer, you can also get dry erase tape. It is a roll of tape you can stick on and write on with standard dry erase markers. From a quick google search, you can find some here, but it is readily available elsewhere.


4

I'd actually recommend painter's tape, despite the "not worth the money" comment in another answer. I find that it doesn't dry out as much as masking tape does, so it sticks longer and is less affected by wet (because it's designed to get wet). It releases well. We also use it to label our lidded canisters with the contents and "best by" date of the current ...


1

In addition to masking tape, which I do like for some purposes, we use erasable labels, like these. They are permanently stuck on (but don't seem to hard to remove, though I use glass not plastic containers), you write on them, and then use the included eraser to erase them so you can write on them again. They seem to survive the dishwasher fine, which is ...


3

Use a "permanent" marker meant for writing on CDs on the containers directly. When storage is over, clean the writing with isopropyl alcohol. The idea is similar to moscafj's, but unlike a nonpermanent marker, it won't smudge when you hold the boxes and move them around. Update If you are uncomfortable using isopropyl alcohol, Pete Kirkham suggests in ...


29

As mentioned in comments, masking tape is an excellent solution. It's cheap, it holds well yet comes off easily, it can be torn off at whatever length you need, and you can write on it with just about anything. Both at home and working at restaurants, I've used masking tape and permanent marker for labeling items for storage in the pantry, fridge, and ...


5

For food storage, I use quart containers (and pints) that I order in bulk from Amazon (like the ones you get at a deli) and zip lock bags...no brand name or funny shaped containers. The quart and pint containers all take the same lid, so no need to search. Then I just use a sharpie to write on these before placing them in the freezer or fridge. I also ...



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