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35

The lower (first) temperature actually cooks the potato so that it is tender, the hotter temperature (second) is what gives the crispy golden coating. If you just did the lower temperature, your fries might be too soft. If you just did the hotter temperature they would be too too tough.


21

Well, that is part of what is going on. Frying at the lower temperature does get it cooked through without over-browning. However, if you kept cooking, you could get it brown without crisping. So, actually it has a lot to do with the changes to the starch molecules in the potatoes. The lower temperature frying brings the starch and water to the exterior of ...


21

In a traditional British chip shop, you would have got your chips (fries for Americans) in yesterday's newspaper, wrapped into a cone shape. These days of course, it's food grade greaseproof paper, but it's still in the same shape. I suspect the reason for serving chips in a cone is that simple tradition. Also, there may be thermal reasons, that it allows ...


12

The potato is probably not as important as the method. Simply frying them will not get you the fry you want. Basically you boil them, then double fry them. Here are the steps for The Perfect French Fry: Ingredients 2 pounds russet potatoes (about 4 large), peeled and cut into 1/4-inch by 1/4-inch fries (keep potatoes stored in a bowl of water) ...


11

There's too many factors to have a set percentage of oil that will stay, but lets cover a few common things that determine the oil in your final product. Heat of the oil: Your oil needs to be plenty hot enough to actually fry in. For fries, you'll typically want to shoot for between 350-375 F. If you don't have a thermometer, then get one! If you ...


10

You can try a few things: dredge the fries in cornstarch (whack them in a plastic bag, give it a good shake), shake off the excess, then season. ensure the fries are in a single layer in the pan - crowding and stacking will mean they steam, not roast when they're nearly done, turn the oven off and leave them in there for 20 minutes or so before serving. ...


10

Here, check this out. This is an article explaining at length how to make perfect French fries. How to make perfect McDonald's style French Fries So basically, you have to cut your fries so that they are 1/4 inch thick an then blanch them in boiling vinegared water (1 tablespoon per quart of water) for about 10 minutes. This has to be done to keep the ...


9

I can think of two approaches. In either case, you are going to want to use dehydrated tomato powder (or ketchup powder), as you certainly don't want to add the water content of the tomato to your fry. Option one would be to mix the tomato powder into a mashed potato, structure that with some hydrocolloid, and fry. The other, much simpler and probably better ...


8

Yes it IS possible to create a "pringles" like product using just a few simple items that you probably already have in your home. I will post the ingredients after I list the few items you need. First you will need a mixing bowl, a measuring cup, measuring spoons, and a pasta maker (to help flatten the dough). If you do not have a pasta making machine, do ...


8

Short answer is no. If you were a cook/food scientist we could cover a lot of the ways you could combine potatoes and starches and then layer on forms, but really, most people would rather just make homemade potato chips with a potato, a mandolin slicer and some hot oil. If you want Pringles, they are generally cheap and available. No need to duplicate in ...


8

French fried potatoes (or as the British say, chips) are a deep fried food. In fact, the US term "to french fry" orignally simply meant to deep fry, although simply "french fry" has now come to mean the dish of french fried potatoes. As such, they inherently are not a low fat or small-oil-volume food. If you are asking how you can create these with less ...


8

Both. Is it soggy with moisture? Or is it soggy with oil? In both cases, the problem isn't excess oil, after all, French Fries are usually deep fried. The problem is that the moisture isn't adequately driven out of the fry and/or that the fries sit in cold oil. The crispiest French fries (read that non-soggy) are first soaked in cold water to remove excess ...


7

In the UK Maris Piper potatos are good for making chips. A lot of 'chippies' in the UK use them.


7

I don't know how exactly you fried them, but normally, the second time you deep-fry them is to get them crisp. Make sure you deep-fry them at a hot temperature (180-190°C or 355-375°F). If they aren't crisp enough for you after two minutes, leave them in for another minute and check again. Another thing I've heard a lot (but without actual proof) is that ...


7

Not to take anything away from the answers already existing for this question, but I want to add one more reference: Kenji Alt's in depth opus on creating the McDonald's style fry at home. In summary, his method is to: Blanche the cut potatoes in water lightly acidified with vinegar, to allow them to cook through while the acid keeps the pectin from ...


7

There are a few questions on this site about French fries, I'd suggest you take a look. But I think the best answer is: baked sticks of potato do not French fries make. French fries are deep fried. You can never get the same results in air, although air fryers do come close. A normal oven bakes, not fries. Here are some sites that experiment with fries and ...


6

The most detailed French fry investigation I have ever seen comes from the French Culinary Institute's Tech 'N Stuff Blog. You can read The Quest for French Fry Supremacy Part 1 and The Quest for French Fry Supremacy Part 2 for a complete overview not only of their technique but also of the hows and whys behind the decisions they made.


6

Apparently Pringles aren't very potatoey. According to Wikipedia: Pringles have only about 42% potato content, with the remainder being wheat starch and flours (potato, corn, and rice) mixed with vegetable oils and an emulsifier. So most likely, you'll be looking at mixing those dried potato flakes with flour and water, forming them into chips and deep ...


6

I take a piece of aluminum foil, crumple it up then smooth it out somewhat still leaving slight concave and convex angles for the fries to crisp evenly without the need of flipping halfway through baking.


6

If you want to make fries the way your favorite restaurant does, you need only a few things. Stuff you need A sauce pan or a fancy fryer, whatever Cold Idaho Russet Burbank No. 1 potatoes Peanut oil Kosher salt Optional Thermometer for measuring oil temperature Cooking instructions Fry at a low temperature until the potatoes are cooked, about 250°...


6

French fries are often double-fried: They are par-fried at a low temperature, to cook all the way through, after which they are often frozen They are finish-fried at a higher temperature to crisp up and be hot for presentation The type of potato matters--high starch like Idahos are ideal. Here is a link to a Serious Eats article by Kenji Alt describing ...


6

The paper cone is a traditional single serve package shape for street vendors, so you can walk away with your chips (fries), and eat while walking. Many street vendors set up shop near parks and beaches (dunes) It is used in other countries too for a single serve, though many use a punnet (cone with point cut off), so it can sit on a park bench etc. For ...


5

Here is an excellent recipe by the guys over at Cooking Issues (and also a follow up report) with almost everything you'd ever want to know about chips. That first recipe is supposedly good even after they've cooled off: Our standard fries are good even when cold. Another option is to cook a lot of chips but stop after their first frying and freeze ...


5

I know I'm a bit late here, but I do have an alternative to frying twice. If you don't want to fry twice, you can also boil the french fries in water that has one or two tablespoons of vinegar or lemon juice for about 15 minutes. You have to allow the fries to cool down after the boiling, at least until the steam is no longer present, before frying. This ...


5

There are a couple tricks I've learned from Cook's Illustrated about making oven fries: Soak your cut potatoes in warm water to rinse off excess surface starch. Drain them and dry them very well (I use a salad spinner and paper towels). Use a heavy duty sheet pan on the bottom rack of a hot oven to focus the heat on crisping the bottoms of the potatoes. ...


5

They won't be as good as when fresh (of course) but generally: You want the oven pretty hot. How hot depends on the oven, size of fry, etc., but a good first guess would be 425°F–450°F. On most toaster ovens I've seen, that'd be as hot as it goes. Let the oven preheat. Unfortunately, heating the oven is going to take longer than your five minutes, probably ...


5

All of the sources I read say the same thing... what makes them different is that they're fried twice. From Saveur: Frites are the supercharged cousin to paltry American-style fries: made from soft Belgian potatoes called bintjes, they're thick-cut and—this is key—double-fried (in the olden days, in molten horse or ox fat, though modern options range ...


4

For maximum crispiness, you will want to fry, not bake. I've never tried this with pumpkin but I think it will be an interesting experiment. As far as spices go, I would highly recommend smoked paprika (pimenton de la vera or pimenton dulce). Another option would be some of the flavors from Thai curries, such ground coriander seed, black pepper, and red ...


4

Kestrel, if you can find some. King Edward, although people don't grow them much nowadays because they are susceptible to disease. Golden Wonder, the classic chipping potato.



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